A joint Conference of icom-demhist and three icom-cc working Groups


Download 77.94 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
Sana03.09.2018
Hajmi77.94 Kb.

 

 

                        



                      

 

 



 

A Joint Conference of ICOM-DEMHIST and three ICOM-CC Working Groups:  

Sculpture, Polychromy, & Architectural Decoration; Wood, Furniture, & Lacquer; and 

Textiles 

The Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, November 6-9, 2012 

María Alejandra García FernandezConservation Problems of Some 

Objects in Francisco de Paula Santander (Colombia), a House Museum 

 

 



Fig. 1. Portraits of Francisco de Paula Santander. Plaster medallion and 

bronze statue. 

 

 

 

Cons ervation   Probl ems of  S ome Ob jects in 

Fran ci sco d e Paula Santand er (Colomb i a), a  H ous e 

Mus eu m  

María Alejandra García Fernandez  

Conservation and Restoration of Cultural Resources, Faculty of Studies 

of Cultural Heritage, Universidad Externado Colombia, Bogata, 

Colombia  

*e-mail: 

Musaarte13@gmail.com

  

Int roducti on   

Francisco de Paula Santander (1792-1840) is one of the key figures in 

the history of Colombia (Figure 1). He fought side by side with Simon 

Bolivar during the war for independence. After Bolivar’s death, 

Santander became the first elected president of La Gran Colombia. He 

is known as “The man of the laws” because, after Colombia gained 

independence, he consolidated the territories of the new republic, 

reformed the financial and educational system and established 

diplomatic relations with other countries [Bushnell, 2007].  

  

 



Abst ract  

This paper focuses on the 

development of a conservation 

strategy for the historic house 

museum, Francisco de Paula 

Santander. This house, located in 

northeast Bogota, Colombia, 

honours the memory of one of the 

key figures of Colombia's 

independence war. Francisco de 

Paula Santander was also 

Colombia’s first elected president. 

After an exhaustive analysis of the 

current conditions of the house 

and the collection, several 

problems were detected: three 

rooms have leaks in the roof; 

other rooms present elevated 

levels of relative humidity and 

particulate material; further 

rooms are affected by excessive 

direct exposure to sunlight in the 

afternoon. All these conditions 

damage the collection in different 

ways. The impact of each of these 

factors is shown in several 

examples. Finally, an appropriate 

conservation strategy, aimed at 

solving the different problems of 

this collection, is presented.  



Keywords    

Preventive conservation; Francisco 

de Paula Santander; Historic 

museums; Museum policies in 

Colombia; Environmental agents; 

Dissociation; Plagues; Preventive 

Conservation model for museums  

 


2

 

 



                        

 

 



T H E  

ARTIFACT

,   I T S 

CONTEXT

  AN D   T H E I R  

NARRA TIVE

:  

M U L T I D I SC I P L I NA R Y   C O N S E R V AT I O N    

I N   H I S T O R I C   H O U SE   M U SE U M S   

 

María Alejandra García Fernandez, Conservation Problems of Some Objects in Francisco de Paula Santander (Colombia), 



a House Museum

 

Fig. 2a and 2b.

 

Facade of the house. 

 

The house museum is located in the northeast of Bogota. Built in 1620, it was originally a country house 

(Figure 2). Currently, the house preserves its spatial conception and its architectural style with four facades, 

open balconies, stone pillars on the first floor, wood pillars on the second floor and thick walls in masonry 

built with a mixture of lime, sand bricks and stone. The roof is clad with terracotta tiles.  

 

 



3

 

 



                        

 

 



T H E  

ARTIFACT

,   I T S 

CONTEXT

  AN D   T H E I R  

NARRA TIVE

:  

M U L T I D I SC I P L I NA R Y   C O N S E R V AT I O N    

I N   H I S T O R I C   H O U SE   M U SE U M S   

 

María Alejandra García Fernandez, Conservation Problems of Some Objects in Francisco de Paula Santander (Colombia), 



a House Museum

 

Fig. 3. Map of the 



house museum 

Francisco de Paula 

Santander 

 

The building was previously known as “Hacienda el Cedro” and was constructed by Spanish conquerors. One 

of them, Antonio Dias Cardoso, received a vast terrain of forest and named it “El Cedro”. Since then, the 

house has had numerous owners and several important events happened there. In 1891, during one of the 

many civil wars, Conservative troops used the building as their headquarters. The troops were attacked by 

Liberal forces, who burned the house. In 1906, Francisco Fernandez Bello bought the house. Bello left the 

house to his son Jose Fernandez on his death. The inheritance continued to the next generation, Cecilia 

Fernandez de Pallini. In 1978, work began on the structure to repair the damages of another later fire. The aim 

was to recover the surroundings of the house and create a museum [Sociedad, 2008]. 

The museum was inaugurated in 1982. The collection is located in the second floor (Figure 3). It consists of 

objects and artifacts relating to Santander. The objective of the museum is to honour and preserve the legacy 

of Santander while educating the public and future generations about him. The museum has sixteen rooms, 

seven of which are external galleries and nine are internal. The objects and the furniture are exhibited to 

resemble an eighteenth century house. At the beginning of a visit, visitors learn about Santander and his 

family by observing some of his personal effects and those belonging to his wife and daughters. Some items 

that can be seen in this part of the museum are clothes, photographs of Santander’s daughters and furniture. 

The second part of the museum shows Santander as a General of the Republic. Here military uniforms, flags, 

paintings of Bolivar, Santander and other generals, and weapons are displayed. The visitor can also view scale 

models of the battles of “Pantano de Vargas” and “Boyaca”. The third section of the museum shows 

Santander as “the man of the laws”, exhibiting his private office with furniture, official letters, books about 

him and images of preliminary versions of the coat of arms of Colombia ordered by Santander. The fourth 

section of the museum pays homage to Santander and his legacy. Artifacts dating from his death to present 

times are presented to the viewer. Here, there are images, commemorations, letters, diplomas, flags and coins. 

The fifth part of the museum consists of  a room dedicated to Santander as President of the Republic and also 

shows pictures of all 

his successors 

including the current 

president. Finally, the 

visit ends with a room 

that explains the 

history of the 

Hacienda and shows 

pictures, historical 

documents, scale 

models and furniture. 

 


4

 

 



                        

 

 



T H E  

ARTIFACT

,   I T S 

CONTEXT

  AN D   T H E I R  

NARRA TIVE

:  

M U L T I D I SC I P L I NA R Y   C O N S E R V AT I O N    

I N   H I S T O R I C   H O U SE   M U SE U M S   

 

María Alejandra García Fernandez, Conservation Problems of Some Objects in Francisco de Paula Santander (Colombia), 



a House Museum

 

Fig. 1 Caption   



 

 

 



The house museum Francisco de Paula Santander has a mixed collection with around 1500 objects, all of them 

exhibited. The collection consists mainly of fabrics, furniture, paper, hair samples, photographs, easel 

paintings and pastel paintings – all organic in nature. The collection also contains some inorganic objects, 

such as ceramics and metals. This paper will summarise the results of a project implemented to investigate the 

current conditions of the house and the 

collection. A selection of 56 high value 

objects was made, including Santander’s 

bed, a wooden cross, an inkwell, 

Santander daughter’s photo album, hair 

samples of Santander’s daughter and 

wife (Figure 4). These artifacts are 

considered important because they were 

everyday objects used by 

Francisco de Paula Santander, his wife 

Doña Sixta Pontón de Santander and 

their daughters. 

 

Table 1: Agenda for the map of the house museum Francisco de Paula Santander 

Fig. 4a. Personal object of Santander. 


5

 

 



                        

 

 



T H E  

ARTIFACT

,   I T S 

CONTEXT

  AN D   T H E I R  

NARRA TIVE

:  

M U L T I D I SC I P L I NA R Y   C O N S E R V AT I O N    

I N   H I S T O R I C   H O U SE   M U SE U M S   

 

María Alejandra García Fernandez, Conservation Problems of Some Objects in Francisco de Paula Santander (Colombia), 



a House Museum

 

 



 

The project lasted for one and a half years (2011-

2012), the objective being to establish a preventive 

conservation plan for the house museum. For this it 

was necessary to know which conservation problems 

the museum and its collection faced. The guideline 

used is the Modelo de análisis de conservación para 

museos developed by the Universidad Externado de 

Colombia [Fernández et al, 2005]. This model divides 

a museum in four components: administrative, 

infrastructure and environment, collection and 

society. Based on this division numerous actions were 

taken. The first one was drawing the floor plans of the 

house and identifying the location of the objects in 

each one of the sixteen rooms. The second was 

establishing a complete photographic registry of the 

place and the collection. After that, luminosity and 

relative humidity were measured in twelve rooms. 

Finally, a registry of the conservation status of the 

collection was written. Also, visitors were asked to take a survey and express their opinions about the 

museum. After analysing these information, a diagnosis revealed the main problems of the collection, among 

which the most prominent are: 

Fig. 4b, 4c, and 4d. Personal objects of Santander. 


6

 

 



                        

 

 



T H E  

ARTIFACT

,   I T S 

CONTEXT

  AN D   T H E I R  

NARRA TIVE

:  

M U L T I D I SC I P L I NA R Y   C O N S E R V AT I O N    

I N   H I S T O R I C   H O U SE   M U SE U M S   

 

María Alejandra García Fernandez, Conservation Problems of Some Objects in Francisco de Paula Santander (Colombia), 



a House Museum

 

Fig. 5. Room 8. The Hall. 



Inf rast ruct ure     

The building edifice requires repair, especially to the roof. Neglect and decay have resulted in leaks that affect 

the collection in three internal rooms, so-called HallHabitacion de descanso del general and Biblioteca. In 

the Hall, water drips directly over a piece of furniture of Imperial style, a table and the carpets. In the 



Habitacion de descanso del general water runs over the rails of Santander’s bed and continues onto the floor. 

In the Biblioteca, water runs over an old light bulb socket and lands over a table.  



Ai r qual i t y    

The museum has sources of 

pollution nearby, such as a main 

highway and the chimneys of 

residential complexes. There are 

not enough sources of ventilation 

due to the fact that air enters 

through two doors with access to 

a closed patio. The lack of a 

periodical cleaning program has 

produced concentrations of 

particulate material affecting the 

collection. The collection in open 

and closed display cases 

presented high levels of 

particulate material. 

The architectural design of the 

house has generated different 

environments in the external and 

internal exhibition rooms. The 

internal rooms have thick walls 

and are cold, with windows near 

the ceiling so natural light does 

not fall directly and affect the 

collection. Relative humidity 

(RH) and temperature (T) were 

measured in twelve rooms. In the 

Habitacion de descanso del 

general records showed a large 

variation of RH between 63.8% 

and 55.3% and a T variation 

between 18.2 and 15.2 degrees Celsius, while the room Batallas presented a variation of RH between 63.1% 

and 59.3% and a T variation between 17.8 and 16 degrees Celsius. As a result, objects consisting of organic 

materials are being affected by a white-coloured fungus. In the first room, the fungus is present in a box 

containing hair samples of Santander’s wife, on fans, in a photo album, in books and on Santander’s bed. In 

the second room, the fungus affects uniforms and hats and the display case where they are located. On top of 

this display case there is a high concentration of particulate material and more fungus. According to analysis 

carried out by the author, the fungus is using the highly concentrated particulate matter as a feeding ground, 



Fig. 5. Room 8. The Hall. 

7

 

 



                        

 

 



T H E  

ARTIFACT

,   I T S 

CONTEXT

  AN D   T H E I R  

NARRA TIVE

:  

M U L T I D I SC I P L I NA R Y   C O N S E R V AT I O N    

I N   H I S T O R I C   H O U SE   M U SE U M S   

 

María Alejandra García Fernandez, Conservation Problems of Some Objects in Francisco de Paula Santander (Colombia), 



a House Museum

 

Fig. 7. Box with hats of military uniforms, suffering from biological infestation by a white fungus.  Room 4: 



Batallas. 

fuelled by the lack of air circulation and the elevated level of relative humidity throughout the house [Calvo, 

1997; Garry, 1998; Michalski, 2009a, 2009b, 2009c]. 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lum i nosi t y    

The external rooms facing west and north receive direct sunlight during the afternoon. In these rooms there 

are windows and also closed balconies with glass. The temperature of these areas in the afternoon varies 

between 21.3 and 17.9 degrees Celsius. The majority of exhibited objects in these rooms are of organic nature, 



Fig. 6. Bed of Francisco de Paula Santander 

from room 2- Habitacion de Descanso del 

General 

8

 

 



                        

 

 



T H E  

ARTIFACT

,   I T S 

CONTEXT

  AN D   T H E I R  

NARRA TIVE

:  

M U L T I D I SC I P L I NA R Y   C O N S E R V AT I O N    

I N   H I S T O R I C   H O U SE   M U SE U M S   

 

María Alejandra García Fernandez, Conservation Problems of Some Objects in Francisco de Paula Santander (Colombia), 



a House Museum

 

Fig. 8. Sunlight directy hiting objects of organic nature. Gallery 3: Villa del Rosario. 

such as fabrics, wood, paper, photographs, posters and easel paintings. According to the measurements taken, 

the luminosity levels are superior to 300 lux, the recommended level for such displays [Michalski, 2009b]. 

The curtains on the windows do not stop sunlight from reaching different areas of the collection and the 

rooms. Sunlight affects these 

objects, such as wood, fabrics 

and paper, negatively. These 

materials are very sensitive to 

high levels of visible light and 

ultraviolet radiation. The result 

of long-term exposure has been 

chromatic degeneration to the 

surfaces causing a yellow-like 

tone, dryness and has increased 

photo oxidation processes. For 

this type of material it is 

recommended that the exposure 

to light never reaches values 

higher that 50 lux [Michalski, 

1998, 09; Calvo, 1997]. 

Examples of deterioration can 

be seen on the clothes of 

Santander’s daughters and wife. 

In order to establish a solution 

strategy, problems were 

labelled according to the 

urgency for a solution. The 

three problems mentioned 

above belong to Level 1 that is, 

urgent. It was recommended 

that solutions be found for these 

problems in less than three 

months. To resolve these issues 

several preventive conservation 

actions were suggested. 

 To resolve the problem of 

water ingress to the edifice, it 

was recommended to secure leaks in the roof thus eliminating further damage due to water running over 

objects. Ceilings and covers were also inspected. It was recommended that biological deterioration caused by 

fungal growth could be prevented by first determining the type of fungus affecting the collection and then 

taking measures to prevent its growth. It is also important to implement a regular cleaning schedule for the 

collection, as well as a continuous observation in order to note further deterioration. Finally, for the third 

problem, actions to mitigate natural illumination are suggested, in particular installing protective layers, such 

as curtains or blinds, in front of the windows that reduce the levels of sunlight entering the building. It has 

been determined that the problems described adversely affect the collection, in particular those artifacts of 

organic nature, which are the most valued because these consist of the everyday objects of Santander, his wife 

and his daughters. It was established that the analyses of relative humidity and temperature were useful and 



9

 

 



                        

 

 



T H E  

ARTIFACT

,   I T S 

CONTEXT

  AN D   T H E I R  

NARRA TIVE

:  

M U L T I D I SC I P L I NA R Y   C O N S E R V AT I O N    

I N   H I S T O R I C   H O U SE   M U SE U M S   

 

María Alejandra García Fernandez, Conservation Problems of Some Objects in Francisco de Paula Santander (Colombia), 



a House Museum

 

necessary since they allowed the determination of environmental factors that affect the collection. The 



accumulated data has provided solutions to the problems encountered during the research project.  

Concl usi on    

The research project has allowed a detailed study of the museum, its building and its collections.  

Reviewing the data collected, it can be concluded that the museum had several problems of different nature, 

all of which required different solutions. Identifying specific problems led to finding individual solutions that 

could be quickly implemented, thus further damage to the artifacts entrusted to the care of the museum could 

be prevented by addressing these issues. Solutions were formulated based on theoretical guidelines and 

subsequently put into practice. These could be implemented using the museum’s own resources.  

Acknow l edgment :  

I would like to thank my thesis advisor Mr Roberto Lleras Pérez for his guidance during the elaboration of this 

work. I would also like to thank Ms Cecilia Fernández de Pallini, the director of the museum Diego Fonnegra 

and the house museum Francisco de Paula Santander for allowing me to conduct my research. 



Ref erences:    

Bushnell, David. 2007. Colombia Una Nación a Pesar De Sí Misma. Bogotá: Editorial Planeta. 

Calvo, A. 1997. Conservación y Restauración. Materiales, Técnicas y Procedimientos. De la A a la Z. Barcelona: 

Ediciones del Serbal. 

Fernández, M., Cohen, D., Ovalle, Á., Gutiérrez, A. And  Garcés, J. 2005. Modelo de Conservación Preventiva para 

Museo, Convenio: No.1871/05. Bogotá: Universidad Externado de Colombia, Facultad de Estudios del Patrimonio 

Cultural. 

Garry, T. 1998. El Museo y su Entorno. Traducción de la 2. Edición inglesa Isabel Balsinde. Madrid España: Ediciones 

Akal, S.A 

Michalski, S. 2009a. Temperatura Incorrecta. Instituto Canadiense de Conservación. ICCROM. PDF. Edición en español.  

Michalski, Stefan. 2009b. Luz visible, Radiación Ultravioleta e infrarroja. Instituto Canadiense de Conservación. 

ICCROM. PDF. Edición en español.  

Michalski, Stefan. 2009c. Humedad Relativa Incorrecta. Canadian Conservation Intitute. ICCROM. PDF. Edición 

español. 

Sociedad Académica Santander. 2008. Casa Museo Francisco de Paula Santander. Guía de Visita. Bogotá: Máster Artes 

Gráficas 

 

 

 



 

 

Disclaimer: 



These papers are published and distributed by the International Council of Museums – Committee for Conservation 

(ICOM-CC) and Committee for Historic House Museums (DEMHIST), with authorization from the copyright holders. The 

views expressed do not necessarily reflect the policies, practices, or opinions of ICOM-CC or DEMHIST. Reference to 

methods, materials, products or companies, does not imply endorsement by ICOM-CC or DEMHIST.

 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling