Academy of Islamic Research and Publications


Download 40.47 Kb.

bet1/32
Sana04.06.2018
Hajmi40.47 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   32

Academy of 
Islamic Research  and  Publications
nmusba.wordpress.com

SAVIOURS  OF 
I S L A MI C   SPI RI T
VOLUME  m
b y
S. ABUL HASAN All NADWI
Translation : 
M O H IU D D IN   A H M A D
A CAD EM Y  OF 
ISLAM IC  RESEARCH  &  PUBLICATIONS
P.O. 
Bax 
119,  NADWA,  LUCKNOW-226 
007 
U.  P.  (INDIA)
nmusba.wordpress.com

A ll rights reserved in favour of: 
Academy of
Islamic Research and Publications 
Post  Box  No.  119,  NadWatuI  Ulama, 
LUCKNOW-23I0O7 U.P?  (INDIA)
at  awtuo' 
Series  No.  170
EDITtONS:
URDU— FIRST  EDITION
EN GLISH-FIRST  EDITION 
SECOND EDITION
1982
1983 
1994
Printed at:
LUCKNOW  PUBLISHING  HOUSE 
LUCKNOW

CONTENTS
Page
FORBWARD 
. . .  
. . .  
••• 
1
I .  
ISLAMIC  WORLD  IN  THB  TENTH  GENTURY 
. . .  
11
Need  for  the  Study  of  the  Tenth  Century 
Condition* 
... 
... 
... 
ib.
Political Conditions 
... 
... 
... 
12
Religious Conditions 
... 
... 
... 
16
Intellectual  Milieu 
... 
... 
... 
2 5
Intellectual  and  Religious  Disquietude 
... 
2 9
Mahdawls 
... 
... 
... 
... 
37
Causes  o f Unrest 
... 
... 
... 
4 2
I I .  
THE  GREATEST  TUMULT  OF  THB  TENTH  CENTURY  . . .  
4 5
Advent  of  a  New  Order 
... 
... 
ib.
I I I .  
AKBAR^S  RULE— THE  CONTRASTING  CuM A XES 
. . .  
53
The  Religious  Period 
... 
... 
... 
ib.
The  Second  Phase  of  Akbar’s  Rule 
... 
6 0
Effect  of  Religious  Discussions 
... 
... 
61
Role  o f  Religious  Scholars 
... 
... 
6 6
Religious  Scholars  of  Akbar’s  Court 
... 
6 8
Courtiers  and  Counsellors 
... 
... 
72
nmusba.wordpress.com

ii
•AVIOURI  OP  ISLAMIC  SPIKIT
IV.
Mulls  Mubarak  and  his  sons
73
Influence  of  Rajput  Spouses
83
Infallibility  Decree
84
Significance  of  the  Decree
86
Fall  of  Makhdum-ul-Mulk  and  Sadr-us-Sudnr  ...
87
The  New  Millennium  and  Divine  Faith
88
Akbar's  Religious  ideas  and  Practices
90
Fire  Worship 
...  :
ib.
Sun  Worship
91
On  Painting
92
Timings  of  Prayer 
...
ib.
Prostration  before  His  Majesty
ib.
Salutation  of  Divine  Faith
93
Aversion  to  Hijrl  Calendar
ib.
Un-Islamic  Feasts  and  Festivals
ib.
Vegetarianism 
... 
... 
...
94
Swine
ib.
Drinking  Bout
95
Adoption  of  un-Islamic  Customs
ib.
Rejection  of  Miracles 
... 
...
ib.
Dislike  for  Circumcission 
... 
...
ib.
Marriage. Regulations 
... 
~.
ib.
Divine  Worship  of  Kings
96
Introduction  of  Ilah I  Calendar
ib.
Remission  of  Zakat 
...
97
Disapproval  of  Islamic  Learning
ib.
Mockery  of  Prophet’s  Ascension 
...
ib.
Disparging  Remarks  about  the  Prophet 
>, 
...
98
Antipathy  and  Irritation  at  the  Propnet’s Names
ib.
Prohibition  of  Prayer
ib.
Mockery  of  Islamic  Values 
... 
...
99
A  Dangerous  turning  point  for  Muslim  India  ...
ib.
MUJADDID  ALF  THANI 
. . .
103
Family 
... 
... 
... 
...
ib.

CONTENTS
Makhdum  Shaikh  ‘Abdul  Ahad
107
Birth  and  Childhood  of  Mujaddid  ...
111
Spiritual  Allegiance  to  Khwaja  Baqi  Billah
113
Shaikh  ‘Abdul  Baqi  (Khwaja  Baqi  Billah)
114
Mujaddid’s  initiation  in  the  Khwaja’s  order 
...
119
MUJADDID  AS  A  SPIRITUAL  GUIDE 
. . .  
. . .
122
Stay  at  Sirhind
ib.
Journey  to  Lahore 
... 
...
123
Arrangement  for  Moral  Regeneration
124
Attitude  of  Jehangir 
... 
...
126
Reasons  for  Detention  at  Gwalior  Fort
129
Internment  in  the  Gwalior  Fort
132
In  the  Gaol  ... 
...
133
Religious  Ecstasy  during  Internment 
...
134
Stay  at  the  Royal  Court 
... 
...
136
The  End  of  Journey
139
Character  and  Daily  Routine 
...  '
143
Features
151
Sons  of  Shaikh  Ahmad  ...
ib.
THE  CORE  OP  THE  MUJADDID’S  MOVEMENT 
,  . . .
154
Trust  in  Muhammad’s  Prophethood
158
Limitations  of  Spiritual  and  Intellectual
Faculties 
... 
... 
... 
...
160
Some  Basic  Questions 
... 
... 
...
162
Critique  o f Pure  Reason  and  Esoteric
Inspiration  ... 
... 
...
163
Limitation  of  Intellect  a ad  the  Knowledge  of
Omnipotent  Creator 
... 
...
169
Stupidity  of  Greek  Philosophers
170
Inadequacy  of  Intellect  to  Perceive  Spiritual
Realities 
...
175
Prophethood  transcends  Intellect  and  Discrusive
Reasoning  ...
176

iv
SAVIOURS  OF  ISLAMIC  SPOUT
Pure  Intellect  in  a  Myth
177
Neo-Platonists  and  Illuminists
180
Shaikhul  IshrSq  Shihab-ud-din  Suhrawardi
182
Similarity  of  Intellect  and  Spiritual
Illumination 
...
184
Impurities  of  Ecstatic  Experiences  ...
186
Conflict  Between  the  Teachings  of Philosophers
and  Prophets
ib.
Purification  unattainable  without  Prophethood  ...
189
Indispensability of the Prophets
ib.
Divine Knowledge and Prophecy
190
Gliosis of G o d :  A Gift of Prohpethood
191
Stages  of  Faith
192
Acceptance of Prophethood based on Sound
Reasoning  ... 
... 
...
ib.
Prophetic Teachings not Verifiable by Intellect  ...
*193
Beyond Intellect and Irrationality
ib.
Method of Worship taught by Prophets alone
ib.
Prophethood Superior to Intellect
194
Station of Prophethood  ...
ib.
Prophets are the Best of Creations
196
Openheartedness of the Prophets
197
Dual Attention  o f Prophets
ib.
Comparison between Saints  and  Prophets
198
Prophetic Appeal meant  for  Heart  ...
199.
Emulation of the Prophets  rewarded  by  Proximity
to God
ib.
Excellence  of  prophethood  surpasses  Saint­
hood
200
Scholars  are  on  the  Right  Path
ib.
Dignity  of  the  Prophets  ...
201
Faith  in  the  Unseen
202
Perfect  Experience  of  the  Ultimate  Reality
203
Islamic  Concept  of  Sufism
ib.
Rejection  of  Bid'at  Hasanah
218

CONTENTS
V
VII. 
UNITY  OF  BEING  VERSUS,  UNITY  OF  MANIFESTATION 
226
Shaikh  Akbar  Muhyl-ud-din  Ibn  ‘Arab! 
... 
ib.
Ibn  Taimiyah’s  criticism  of  Wahdat-ul-WujGd 
... 
230
Corroding  Influence  o f Wahdat-ul-Wujud 
... 
231
Indian  Followers  o f Ibn  ‘Arab! 
... 
... 
234
Shaikh  ‘Ala-ud-daulS  Samn&ni’s  opposition  to 
Unity  o f Being 
... 
... 
235
Wahdat-us-Shuhiid or  Unity  of Manifestation 
... 
236
The  Nefcd  of a  New  Master 
... 
... 
237,
Mujaddid’s  Fresh  Approach 
... 
238
Personal  Experiences  of  the  Mujaddid 
... 
239
Unity o f Existence 
... 
'  ... 
... 
243
Moderate  views  about  Ibn  ‘Arabi 
... 
245
Opposition  to  Existential  Unity 
... 
... 
247
Greatness  of  Shaikh  Ahmad 
... 
... 
250
Compromising  Attitude  o f the  later  Scholars  ... 
ib.
Saiyid  Ahmad  Shahld 
... 
... 
251
t
VIII.  FROM  AKBAJt  TO  JAHANO® 
... 
... 
252
Some  worthy  Scholars  and  Mystics 
... 
ib.
Beginning  of  Mujaddid’s  Reformatory  Effort 
... 
256
Proper  y n e   o f Action 
... 
... 
... 
257
Thoughts  that  breathe  and  Words that burn 
... 
261
Letters  to  the  Nobles  and  Grandees 
... 
262
Avoiding  Recurrence  of  Mistakes 
... 
... 
270
Mujaddid’s  personal  contribution 
... 
... 
273
Influence  of  the  Mujaddid  on  Jahangir 
... 
274
Reign  of  Shahjahan 
... 
... 
... 
275
Prince  Dara  Shikoh 
... 
... 
... 
278
Muhyl-ud-din  Aurangzeb  ‘Alamgir  ... 
... 
281
IX.  NOTABLE  ADVERSARIES  OF  SHAIKH  AHMAD 
... 
292
X. 
GROWTH  AND  DEVELOPMENT  OF  MUJADDIDYAH  ORDER 
309
The  Eminent  Deputies  ... 
... 
ib.

vi
SAVIOUR*  OF  ULA.UIC  SPIRIT
Khwaja  Muhammad  M'asum 
... 
... 
310
Saiyid  Adam  Binnauri 
... 
... 
... 
312
Other  Eminent  Mystics  ... 
... 
... 
313
Khwaja  Saif-ud-din  Sirhindi 
... 
... 
ib.
From  Khwaja  Muhammad  Zubair  to  Maulana 
Fazlur Rahman  Ganj-MoradababI 
... 
316
Mirza  Mazhar  Jan  janan  and  Shan  Ghulam
‘Ali 
..4 
... 
...................... 
318
Maulana  Khalid  RQmi 
... 
... 
... 
320
Shah  Ahmad  Sa‘eed  and  his  Spiritual 
Descendants 
.. 
... 
... 
323
Shah  ‘Abdul  Ghanl 
... 
... 
... 
325
Ihsaniyah  Order 
... 
... 
... 
328
Saiyid  Shah  ‘Alam  Ullah  and  his  family 
... 
329
Shaikh  Sultan  o f Ballia 
... 
... 
... 
330
Hafiz  Saiyid  ‘Abdullah  Akbar aba  i  
... 
ib.
Saiyid  Ahmad  Shahid  and  his  followers 
... 
332
XI. 
1 THE  WORKS  OF  SHAIKH  AHMAD  MUJADDID SIRHINDI  . . .  
335
Bibliography  ... 
... 
... 
... 
339
Index 
... 
... 
... 
... 
347

FOREWORD
It  was  perhaps  1935  or  1936  when my respected  brother 
Hakim  Dr.  Syed  ‘Abdul  ‘Ali,  late Nazim of Nadwatul  ‘UlamS, 
directed  me  to  go  through  the  Maktubat  Imam  Rabbsni 
Mujaddid  A lf  ThSni.  I  was  then  not  more  than  23  or  24 
years  of  age  and  had  joined,  a  short  while  ago,  as  a  teacher 
in  the  Darul  ‘Uloom,  Nadwatul  ‘Ulama.  I  had  never  delved 
in  the  sufl  literature  nor  was  conversant with  the  terminology 
of  mystic  discipline.  I  had  assiduously  pursued  history  and 
literature  of the Arabs,  particularly history of Arabic literature, 
and  was  used  to  reading  books  with  a  fine  get  up  and 
printing  produced  in  Beirut  and  Egypt.  My  brother  was fully 
aware  of  my  tastes  and  likings  for  it  was  he  who  had  been 
the  chief  guide  during  my  educational  attainments,  but  he 
intended perhaps  to let me  know what Iqbal  has so trenchantly 
versified in this couplet:
You  are  but  the  lamp  of  a  hearth,
Which  has  ever  had  things  spiritual  at  heart.
Our  family  has  been  intimately  connected,  at  least  for 
the  last  three  hundred  years,  intellectually  and  spiritually,  with 
the  school  of  thought  that  goes  by  the  name  of  Mujaddid  Alf 
Than!  and  Shah  Waliullah.  The  private  library  of my  father 
had  a  three  volume  collection  of  Mujaddid’s  letters  which  had 
been  printed  at  AhmadI  Press  of  Delhi.  I  started  reading  the 
book  in  compliance  with  the  wish  expressed  by  my  brother.

2
SAVIOURS  OF  ISLAMIC  SPIRIT
but  was  so  discouraged  that  I  had  to  put  it  off  more  than 
once.  The  letters  written  by  the  Mujaddid  to  bis  spiritual 
mentor  Khawaja  Baqi  Billah describing his spiritual experiences 
and  ecstatic  moods  were  specially  disconcerting  to  me,  but  my 
brother  kept  on  prodding  me  to  go  through  the  letters  along 
with  the  Izdlatul  Khifa  of  Shah  Wallullah,  Sirat-i-Mustaqim 
of  Saiyid  Ahmad  Shahld  and  Shah  Isma'il  Shahld’s  Man&ab-i- 
Jmsmat.  At  last  I made  up  my mind  to  go  through  all  these 
books once  for all.  I felt ashamed  for not being able to do what 
my brother had bidden.  And  what was  this collection  of letters; 
had  it  not  been  cherished  by  the  most  purehearted  souls? 
Providence  came  to  my  rescue  and  the  more  I  read  the  book, 
the  more  I  found  it  fascinating.  Now  I  began  to  understand 
its  contents  and  then  a  time  came  when  I  became  enamoured 
by  it.  It  so  attracted  my  interest  that  I  found  it  more  fasci- 
nating  than  the  best  literary  creations.  I  was  then  passing 
through a  most  critical  stage of my  life:  certain  mental  tensions 
and  intellectual  stresses  and  strains  had  put  me  in  a  turmoil. 
The  book  then  came  as  a  spiritual  guide  to  me.  I  could 
clearly  perceive  the  placid  calm  and  equanimity  overtaking my 
heart.  The  journey  I  had  begun  in  obedience  to  the  wishes 
of  my  brother  got  me  through  an  enchanting  delight.
I  again  started  reading  the  Mujaddid’s  letters,  after  a 
short  time,  with  the  intention of  classifying  the  ideas  expressed 
in  it  under  different  headings.  I  -started  preparing  an  index 
of  the  subjects  dealt  with  in  it,  for  example,  listing  the  pass­
ages  dealing  with  the  Oneness  of  God  and  repudiation  of 
polytheistic  ideas,  prophethood,  teachings  of  the  Prophet  and 
aberrations from it, non-existence of pious  innovations,  Unity  of 
Being  and  Unity  of  Manifestation,  reaches  of  intellect  and  in­
tuition,  and  so  on.  The  index  thus  prepared  after  several 
weeks’  labour  was  kept  by  me  in  the  book  I  had  used  for 
preparing  it,  so  as  to  utilise  it  later  on  for  collecting  the 
passages  according  to their  headings.  But,  somebody borrowed 
the  book  from  me  and  it was  never  returned.  I  was  saddened

f o r e w o r d
3
more  by  loss  of  the  index  prepared  so  laboriously  than  of  the 
book  which  could  have  been  procured  again.
Several  years  after  this  incident,  perhaps  in  1945  or 
1946,  I again  thought  of rearranging  the different topics touched 
upon  in  these  letters  and  presenting  them  with  an  exposition 
that  may  catch  the  interest  of  modern  educated  youth  and ac­
quaint him with the achievements of the Mujaddid in  the  field of 
reform  and  revivalism.  Accordingly  I  undertook  the  task  with 
an  introductory  note  designed  to  give  the  substance  of  propo­
sitions  and  statements  on  a  particular  subject  followed  by  the 
passages  on  that  topic,  which  were  scattered  throughout  the 
letters. 
These  extracts  were  also  to  be  arranged  meaning­
fully  in a systematic order, giving both the Persian text and Urdu 
translation  with  explanatory  notes  of  difficult  terms  along  with 
the ah&dith  and supportive  views  of  the well-known scholars and 
doctors  of  religion.  The  comprehensive  study  I  had  designed 
to  undertake  required  a  close  inquiry  of  various  issues  and 
was  surely  a  difficult  task  for  a  young  student  like  me  who 
had already been overburdened with teaching, writing and Tabligh 
activities.  The  result  was  obvious:  by  the  time  I  completed 
the  topics  of  Divine  Unity,  prophethood  and  apostleship  it  be­
came difficult for me  to  continue  it  owing  to other engagements. 
But,  whatever  of it had  been  written  was  sufficiently  useful  and 
my  friend  Maulana  Mohammad  Manzoor  Nomani  published 
them in his  monthly journal  Al-Furq&n in four instalments  during 
the year  1947-48.
After  a  few  years  when  I  started  writing  the  history  of 
revivalist movements, which' has  since  appeared  under  the  series 
entitled  'Saviours o f Islamic Spirit'  the  urge  to  write a biographi­
cal account of  the Mujaddid  engrossed  my  thoughts  once again- 
In the  last  volume  of  the  book  I  had  given  an  account  of  two 
great  Indian  mystics,  Khwaja  Nizam-ud-dln  Auliyi  and  Sheikh 
Sharaf-ud-din  Yahya  Manerl,  belonging  to  the  eighth  century 
of  Islamic  era.  I  wanted  to  portray  the  life  and  character  of 
the  Mujaddid  in  the  subsequent  volume  since  it  needed  to 
be

4
SAVIOUR!  OF  ISLAMIC  SPIRIT
brought  into  focus,  for  reasons  more  than  one,  in  the  present 
times  of  catastrophic  change.  I  felt  it  necessary  to  restate,  in 
clear  terms,  the  strategy  adopted  by  the  Mujaddid  for  it  has  a 
greater  relevance  today  (when  the  revivalist  movements  invaria­
bly pit themselves against the governments of their  countries, from 
the  very  beginning,  and  plunge  into  difficulties).  What  was, 
after  all,  the  method  by  which an  ascetic had changed the entire 
trend  and  complexion  of  the  government  of  his  day  without 
any  means  and  resources?  My  attention  had  been  drawn  to­
wards  this  fact  first  in  the  soirees of my  elder brother  and  then 
by the  scholarly  article  of  Syed  Manazir  Ahsan  Gilani  appear­
ing  in  the  special  issue  o f  the  AI-FurqSn  devoted  to  the 
Mujaddid.  The  more  I  thought  about  the  matter,  the  more  I 
was  convinced  of the  correctness  of Mujaddid’s approach  which 
has  been  expressed by  me in several  of my articles and speeches1 
in Arabic.
There  were  still  two  stumbling  blocks  in  attempting  a 
biography  of  the  Mujaddid.  The  first  was that no biographical 
(ketch  of  the  Mujaddid  could  be  considered  complete  or  satis­
factory  without  a critical assessment of the doctrines  of Unity of 
Being  and Unity of Manifestation and outlining the latter precept 
in some  detail  to  demonstrate its  validity.  The  writings  on  the 
subject  have  by  now  so  copiously  accumulated  that  it  is  diffi­
cult  to  abridge  all  of  them  or  present  even selected  passages. 
Moreover, both these precepts relate to doctrinal and philosophical 
aspects of Islamic mysticism  which cannot be understood  without 
adequate  comprehension  of  their  terminologies  and  techniques 
depending,  finally,  on  spiritual  exercises  to  be  experienced  and 
mastered rather than explained in words.  The author is himself a 
stranger to this field while most of the readers would , I suppose, be 
unfamiliar or rather estranged to these disciplines.  How  to acquit
1.  I   may  refer,  for  instance,  to  my  two  speeches,  one  in  the  Azhar 
University, Cairo, and the other in the Islamic University, Medina, both 
of which have  since  been  published.

FOREWORD
5
myself of this onerous  responsibility  was a problem  for  me.  On 
the other hand, to leave the matter untouched altogether, which is 
considered by some as the focal point of the  Mujaddid’s reformat­
ory endeavour and the secret of his marvellous achievement, would 
have  rendered  the venture  deficient  and  incomplete.  The other 
difficulty was the abundant literature already  existing on the  sub­
ject which left no new  ground  to  be  broken  nor  allowed  addi­
tion  of one more work to  it.
In  regard  to  my  first  problem  I  decided  after  fully  weigh­
ing  the  pros  and  cons  of  the  matter  that  the  Mujaddid’s  con­
cepts  could best be  presented  with  the  help  of  his  own  writings 
and  the  exposition  of  his  ideas  by  recognised  authorities  and 
scholars  belonging  to his  school  o f thought  so  that  the  readers 
may  be  led  to  understand  the basic features of  the  Mujaddid’s 
thoughts and concepts.  Those who desire to pursue their  studies 
in  greater  detail  can  then  turn  to  the  original  sources  or  take 
the  assistance  of  well-known  authorities.
The  way  out  to  my  second  difficulty  was  shown  by  a 
couplet of  the  Poet  of  the East which  has  also  found  confirma­
tion from my  own  experience as  a writer.  These verses by Iqbal 
could  be  so  rendered  :
Never think the cup bearer’s task has finished,
The grape still has a thousand wines untouched.
Much  has  been  written  on  the  Mujaddid  and  his  accom­
plishments,  but  there  is  room  to  write  more,  and  so  will  it 
remain in future also.
Idioms  and  expressions,  situations and  circumstances  and 
norms  and  values  change  with  the  times  and it is  not  unoften 
that 
we 
find earlier writings  as  if  penned  in a different  language 
requiring  a  new  rendering  to  be  fully  comprehended  by  the 
later  generations.  Apart  from  it,  every  writer  has  his  owa 
w a y  
of  interpreting  things,  relating  causes  to  the  effects  and 
drawing  conclusions  for  making  them  applicable  to  the  shape 


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   32


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling