C e n t r a L p a m a g a z I n e


Download 57.91 Kb.

Sana02.04.2018
Hajmi57.91 Kb.

C E N T R A L   P A   M A G A Z I N E   |   M A R C H   2 0 1 1

 

23

22

 

M A R C H  

2 0 1 1   |   C E N T R A L   P A   M A G A Z I N E

T

HAT



 M

T

.  G



RETNA

 M

AGIC



M

t.  Gretna?  It’s  small-town 

America with a twist. A town 

without  Starbucks,  shopping 

centers  or  even  a  supermarket. 

A town where many of one’s closest friends 

are also close neighbors. A place where peo-

ple get their local news mainly through daily 

treks to pick up their mail at the post office.

“Spending  a  day  in  Mt.  Gretna  makes 

you feel that life is a whole lot simpler,” says 

the  writer  of  “Outta  the  Way!,”  an  online 

blog devoted to small towns and byways.

Linda Bell — who not only lives in Mt. 

Gretna but also runs the town’s 37-year-old 

Outdoor Art Show and serves as secretary 

to  the  water  department,  borough  office 

and  historic  Chautauqua  district  —  says 

that  when  she  drives  over  the  mountain 

and heads home, it’s like “sliding back into 

1943.”

“Mt.  Gretna?  You  either  get  it  or  you 



don’t,” Donna Sturgis said several years ago 

when she opened her 1905-era cottage for 

Mt.  Gretna’s  annual  tour  of  homes.  With 

its  narrow  streets,  almost  perpetual  shade 

and homes nestled so closely together they 

nearly touch, Mt. Gretna isn’t for everyone. 

But Donna and her husband, Bill, love it. 

Even though she’s lived at her hillside home in Mt. Gretna for the past 12 years, 

when Sally Bomberger returns at the end of a business day from her office in Harrisburg, 

she says it “feels like I’m going on vacation.” She pauses for a moment, then asks, 

“How many people do you suppose can say that?”

It’s a feeling, she adds, “that never goes away.”

“When people ask me what you do here all 

year long, I know that they probably weren’t 

meant to live here,” she says.

For most of the 1,500 or so year-round 

residents, rhapsodizing comes easily. It is a 

place  where  generations  have  spun  family 

memories,  where  temperatures  are  always 

10 degrees cooler than in Lancaster or even 

Lebanon,  where  people  known  by  first 

names like “Emi,” “Dale” and “Joe” figure, 

respectively, as the town’s real estate doyenne, 

perambulating  raconteur  and  mayor,  who 

also drops everything at his computer repair 

shop to answer the fire company’s siren as 

a volunteer.

“There’s  something  magical  about  this 

place,”  said  a  visitor  strolling  on  a  mid-

summer night along Pennsylvania Avenue, 

one of many streets where strings of colorful 

lanterns  illuminate  porches  lined  with 

rocking  chairs.  Even  for  many  long-term 

residents, a walk through town on summer 

evenings becomes a nightly ritual.

“When  you  walk  the  streets,  you  hear 

echoes of voices,” says Becky Lenington, who 

lives in Mt. Gretna and commutes daily to 

her office in Camp Hill. “Sometimes they’re 

little  voices;  other  times  big,  burly  voices. 

And there’s something that makes you want 

to see inside these happy places where those 

voices come from. For some reason, there’s 

something that makes you think there’s this 

incredible secret inside,” she says.

Whatever the secret, it remains hidden 

even from those who live here. “Maybe it’s 

better that we don’t dig too deeply to find 

what  makes  Mt.  Gretna  special,”  the  late 

Barry  Miller  once  observed.  Miller  was  a 

leader of the Chautauqua, one of Mt. Gret-

na’s seven neighborhoods spread over three 

townships and a borough. It is a municipal 

patchwork reminiscent of Dorothy Parker’s 

description of Los Angeles — “72 suburbs 

in search of a city.”

During  the  summer,  Mt.  Gretna’s 

population swells to roughly 2,500. And on 

big occasions, such as the annual Outdoor 

Art Show, as many as 20,000 visitors pour 

into town on a single weekend. The show is 

a kaleidoscopic display of juried paintings, 

sculpture  and  jewelry  that  takes  place 

under the trees during the third weekend of 

August. 

Mt.  Gretna’s  mostly  wooden  cottages, 

small by modern standards, average maybe 

800 to 1,400 square feet, not including their 



P

H O T O G R A P H Y

 

B Y

  C

A R L

  E

L L E N B E R G E R

 

U N L E S S

 

O T H E R W I S E

 

I N D I C A T E D

Above:

 Five charming examples of 

Mt. Gretna cottages

Below:

 Old postcards show 

Lake Conewago, a popular summer 

attraction, and Hotel Conewago, 

which was torn down in the 1940s.

B

Y

  R

O G E R

  G

R O C E


24

 

M A R C H  

2 0 1 1   |   C E N T R A L   P A   M A G A Z I N E

sweeping  porches.  Despite  generally 

cramped  kitchens  and  closets  built  for 

the  sparse  wardrobes  of  the  1890s, 

today’s owners often devise ways to make 

the  most  of  small  spaces.  “Do  people 

actually  live  in  these  cottages?” 

incredulous visitors sometimes ask.

Indeed, they do. Most enjoy the swirl 

of  cultural  programs,  plays,  concerts, 

lectures  and  crafts  that  make  choosing 

what to do on a typical summer night a 

delightful  dilemma.  Whether  full-  or 

part-time  residents,  Mt.  Gretnans  come 

from  places  such  as  New  York  City, 

Philadelphia,  Washington,  D.C.,  or 

nearby  cities  such  as  Harrisburg,  York, 

Lancaster and Reading.

They  carve  out  their  own  traditions. 

At  The  Vireo,  a  cottage  on  Muhlenberg 

Avenue, three families now hold dinners 

around  “an  old  table  we  picked  up 

from  somewhere,”  says  Judy  Johnson, 

one  of  the  original  owner’s  three 

granddaughters.  Everyone  who  stays 

overnight  must  etch  something  into  the 

tabletop.  “Maybe  100  different  people 

have  carved  their  imprints,”  she  says. 

“Occasionally,  something  they  might 

have carved 10 years ago now has changed 

— like a divorce. So they will have to add 

something else. It’s sort of a history book of 

friends and family.”

Mt.  Gretna’s  history  traces  to  the  late 

1800s,  when  Robert  H.  Coleman,  one  of 

the wealthiest men in America at the time, 

sought  to  create  a  picnic  ground  for  his 

nearly  completed  narrow-gauge  railway. 

He  settled  on  this  spot  and  added  a  park 

with  “pavilions,  rustic  bridges,  flirtation 

walks,  lovers’  retreats  and  shady  nooks,” 

wrote a turn-of-the-century reporter. About 

the  same  time,  the  Pennsylvania  National 

Guard quartered up to 10,000 troops there 

for  summer  training.  Mt.  Gretna,  in  fact, 

was a major military encampment until the 

mid-1930s, when the Guard moved to Fort 

Indiantown Gap. The military’s departure, 

plus the Great Depression, left Mt. Gretna 

desolate but not devastated.

The  town  remained  alive  thanks  to  a 

cultural spark Coleman had lit six decades 

earlier. He offered land to the Chautauqua 

movement, which originated in New York 

State  “to  bring  scientific  and  cultural 

enlightenment”  to  America’s  small  towns. 

Coleman also encouraged establishment of 

a religious “Campmeeting” across the street. 

Summer  worshipers  pitched  their  tents 

outside a pavilion. Later, the 20-by-24-foot 

plots  originally  laid  out  for  tents  became 

footprints  of  building  lots  for  permanent, 

but unheated, cottages.

Those  summer  dwellings,  many  now 

winterized, promote a sense of neighborli-

ness.  Because  the  cottages  are  so  close  to 

each other, summer breakfasts on the porch 

sometimes become potluck affairs as people 

exchange  scrambled  eggs  and  bacon  over 

porch railings for their neighbors’ pancakes 

or blueberry muffins. 

Although  all  this  might  strike  some 

as  too  much  togetherness,  the  appeal  for 

others  is  magnetic.  All  in  the  Family  star 

Sally Struthers, finishing up an appearance 

at Mt. Gretna’s Playhouse, told her closing 

night audience, “When I get back to L.A., 

I’m gonna build me a porch.”

Mt.  Gretna’s  84-year-old  theater 

company  enjoys  a  venerable  reputation  on 

the  straw-hat  circuit.  Charlton  Heston 

appeared  there  in  the  1940s.  Bernadette 

Peters, Lionel Hampton, Dave Brubeck and 

others have also made their way to the Mt. 

Gretna stage. 

In fact, about 168,000 visitors come every 

summer — to spend a day, a week or longer 

at the Playhouse, Mt. Gretna Lake, Timbers 

Dinner Theater or the Jigger Shop ice cream 

emporium.  They  also  come  for  lectures, 

crafts, play readings and book reviews at the 

Hall of Philosophy. “How many towns can 

say they have a Hall of Philosophy?” the late 

playwright Eton Churchill once asked. 

It is a point of distinction, little known, 

perhaps, but one that Mt. Gretnans cherish. 

Others  include  a  pizzeria  that  also  serves 

American-style  breakfasts,  a  frog  pond 

that’s  a  favorite  retreat  of  authors  such  as 

children’s  fantasy  writer  Elizabeth  Wein, 

and a mystical belief that Mt. Gretna is a 

spot  where  Lei  Lines  intersect  (affirming 

its reputation among New Agers as a place 

where  peace,  harmony  and  love  reign). 

“Have you ever noticed how many couples 

walk around holding hands?” asks Michael 

Russell,  a  former  resident  who’s  not  sure 

about the Lei Lines theory but thinks it may 

have some merit.

Yet if not mystical allure, what is it that 

draws  people  to  Mt.  Gretna?  Perhaps  it’s 

best not to delve too deeply. “Mystery must 

be respected,” said the French artist Georges 

Braque. It is a point the late Marlin Seiders, 

a former Navy chaplain, might have liked. 

For Mt. Gretna, he once said, “is not a place, 

but a spirit.” 

i

S



UMMERTIME

 

IN



 

M

T



. G

RETNA


Got the Nerve? Triathlon

 

GTN is a sprint triathlon with a 500-yard swim in Mt. Gretna Lake, a 



16-mile bike ride through Lebanon and Lancaster Counties and a 5K 

run on a nearby flat Rails-to-Trails path. Race day is 

May 21. The triathlon benefits IM ABLE Foundation 

(getupandmove.org/gotthenerve).

Mt. Gretna Lake & Beach

 

Open daily from 11:30am-6:30pm, May 28-September 5 for swim-



ming, canoe and kayak rentals and picnic areas. See mtgretnalake.

com or call 717-964-3130 for more information.

Mt. Gretna Cicada Festival

 

A series of films, play readings and concerts will be held at the 



Mt. Gretna Playhouse and Chautauqua Hall of Philosophy during the 

17th annual festival. Go to cicadafestival.com or 

call 717-964-2046 for information.

Gretna Theatre Summer Season

 

Opens with Nunset Boulevard, which runs from June 2-5. The season 



closes with Funny Girl, which runs from July 21-31. 

Go to gretnatheatre.com or call 717-964-3627 for more details.

Heritage Festival

 

Series of free shows at the Tabernacle opening with Pastime on 



June 19 at 7pm. Shows continue every Sunday in July at 7pm, 

ending with the Lebanon Swing Band on July 24. Go to 

mtgretna.com/heritage or call 717-964-3040 for more information.

Timbers Restaurant & Dinner Theatre

 

Hosts a contemporary two-act revue with comedy skits and musical 



numbers. Starting July 13, the show is on Tuesday-Friday at 5:30pm, 

Wednesday at 11:30am with matinees available on some Saturdays. 

See gretnatimbers.com or call 717-964-3054 for details.

Music at Gretna Summer Season

 

Concerts begin with Cherish the Ladies on August 4, and continue until 



September 4, when the Audubon Quartet appears. The New Black 

Eagle Jazz Band is scheduled to perform, but the date is to be 

determined. Go to gretnamusic.org

 

or call 717-361-1508 for 



times and ticket information.

Mt. Gretna Tour of Homes & Gardens

 

The 27th annual tour will be held on Saturday, August 6 from 



10am-5pm. Proceeds go to Music at Gretna. See gretnamusic.org/

tourofhomes or call 717-361-1508 for information 

or to purchase tickets.

Sneak Some Zucchini Onto Your 

Neighbor’s Porch Night

 

Takes place on August 8. The observance was created by actor 



Tom Roy and his wife, Ruth, of Mt. Gretna, whose website (wellcat.com) 

advises, “Due to the overzealous planting of zucchini, citizens are 

asked to drop off baskets of the squash on neighbors’ doorsteps.”

Mt. Gretna Outdoor Art Show

 

A community fundraiser promoted by the Pennsylvania Chautauqua 



featuring food, live music and works by hundreds of artists. The show 

takes place August 20 from 9am-6pm and August 21 from 9am-5pm. 

Visit mtgretnaarts.com or call 717-964-3054 for details. 

Summer Craft Market

 

Conveniently held at the same time as the Mt. Gretna Outdoor 



Art Show. Exhibitors display and sell handcrafts and original 

art pieces. Go to mtgretnashows.com or call 717- 964-2273 

for additional information.

Dancing Under the Stars

Live music and wine tastings from 7:30-10:30pm on Saturday, August 

27. Proceeds benefit local Mt. Gretna nonprofit organizations. See 

mtgretna.com/dancing or call 717-866-4274 for more details.

Above:

 Colorful rooms, porches and 

kitchens reflect their owners’ tastes 

and create a festive atmosphere. 

The Jigger Shop is a popular 

gathering place surrounded 

by narrow shady avenues.

The Mt. Gretna 

Outdoor Art 

Show welcomes 

hundreds of 

juried exhibitors 

and thousands 

of visitors.



A

B O V E

 

P H O T O S

 

B Y

  M

A D E L A I N E

  G

R A Y


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling