C o r p o r a t I o n


Download 3.5 Mb.

bet1/52
Sana24.05.2018
Hajmi3.5 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   52

C O R P O R A T I O N

PRECISION  

and  

PURPOSE

Airpower in the  

Libyan Civil War

Edited by

 Karl P. Mueller


Limited Print and Electronic Distribution Rights

This document and trademark(s) contained herein are protected by law. This representation of RAND 

intellectual property is provided for noncommercial use only. Unauthorized posting of this publication 

online is prohibited. Permission is given to duplicate this document for personal use only, as long as it is 

unaltered and complete. Permission is required from RAND to reproduce, or reuse in another form, any of 

its research documents for commercial use. For information on reprint and linking permissions, please visit  

www.rand.org/pubs/permissions.html.

The RAND Corporation is a research organization that develops solutions to public policy challenges to help 

make communities throughout the world safer and more secure, healthier and more prosperous. RAND is 

nonprofit, nonpartisan, and committed to the public interest. 

RAND’s publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.

Support RAND

Make a tax-deductible charitable contribution at  

www.rand.org/giving/contribute

www.rand.org

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Mueller, Karl P.

  Precision and purpose : airpower in the Libyan Civil War / Karl P. Mueller [and thirteen 

others].

       pages cm

  Includes bibliographical references and index.

  ISBN 978-0-8330-8793-5 (pbk. : alk. paper)

1. Libya—History—Civil War, 2011---Aerial operations. 2.  Libya—History--Civil War, 

2011---Campaigns. 3.  Air power—History—21st century.  I. Title.

 DT236.M74 2015

  961.205—dc23

2015012120

For more information on this publication, visit 

www.rand.org/t/RR676

Published by the RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, Calif.

© Copyright 2015 RAND Corporation

R

® is a registered trademark.



Cover image: Belgian Air Force F-16 over Ghardabiya Air Base, Libya, on  

April 29, 2011; courtesy of the Belgian Air Force, photo by Vador. 

iii

Preface

From March 19 to October 31, 2011, the United States and a coalition of fellow North 

Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) allies and partner states waged a remarkable 

air war in Libya. Operation Odyssey Dawn and Operation Unified Protector were 

designed to protect Libya’s civilian populace under a United Nations mandate, and in 

conjunction with the country’s new opposition movement, they led to the defeat and 

removal of the dictatorial regime of Colonel Muammar Qaddafi. The campaign, in 

which the coalition suffered no casualties and which cost a relatively inexpensive few 

billion dollars, is now being proffered as a model for future U.S. and NATO expedi-

tionary operations. 

This report, written by a team of U.S. and international experts, examines the 

origins, planning, execution, and results of the air campaign, with the goal of drawing 

lessons from it that will help prepare the U.S. Air Force and its allies and partners for 

future operations in which such a strategy of aerial intervention could be a promising 

policy option.

The research reported here was sponsored by General Philip M. Breedlove, Vice 

Chief of Staff of the Air Force, and conducted within the Strategy and Doctrine Pro-

gram of RAND Project AIR FORCE.



RAND Project AIR FORCE

RAND Project AIR FORCE (PAF), a division of the RAND Corporation, is the U.S. 

Air Force’s federally funded research and development center for studies and analyses. 

PAF provides the Air Force with independent analyses of policy alternatives affecting 

the development, employment, combat readiness, and support of current and future 

air, space, and cyber forces. Research is conducted in four programs: Force Moderniza-

tion and Employment; Manpower, Personnel, and Training; Resource Management; 

and Strategy and Doctrine. The research reported here was prepared under contract 

TA7014-06-C-0001.

Additional information about PAF is available on our website: 

http://www.rand.org/paf/


v

Contents

Preface

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

iii

Figures and Tables

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ix

Acknowledgments

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

xi

Abbreviations

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

xiii

CHAPTER ONE

Examining the Air Campaign in Libya  

Karl P. Mueller

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1

Introduction



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1

Considering the Libyan Air Campaign in Context



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2

Why the Libyan Air Campaign Is Important



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6

What This Book Is (and Is Not) About 



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

7

Study Approach and Overview



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8

CHAPTER TWO



Strategic and Political Overview of the Intervention  

Christopher S. Chivvis

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

11

Introduction



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

11

Libya and the Arab Uprisings



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

11

The Debate over Intervention



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

14

U.N. Security Council Resolution 1973



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

17

Operation Odyssey Dawn



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

21

Transition to NATO Command



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

24

Operation Unified Protector



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

26

The Relief of Misrata



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

31

Naval Operations



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

32

Operations Grind On



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

32

Increasing the Diplomatic Pressure



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

34

Emergence of the Western Front



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

35

The Fall of Tripoli



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

38

The Impact on NATO



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

40


vi    Precision and Purpose: Airpower in the Libyan Civil War

CHAPTER THREE

The Libyan Experience  

Frederic Wehrey

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

43

Introduction



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

43

Libyan Airpower and Air Defenses: A Hollow and Marginalized Force



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

45

Between Awe and Exasperation: Perceptions of NATO Airpower



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

50

Targeting and Coordination with NATO



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

61

Conclusion



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

66

CHAPTER FOUR



The U.S. Experience: National Strategy and Campaign Support  

Robert C. Owen

  . . . . . .

69

Introduction



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

69

Intervention



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

70

Deployment and Operations



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

77

Allies



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

100


Conclusions and Lessons

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

102

CHAPTER FIVE

The U.S. Experience: Operational  

Deborah C. Kidwell

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

107

Introduction



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

107


U.S. Military Planning and Considerations

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

108

Evolving Strategic Guidance 



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

115


The Coalition Coalesces

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

118

Concept of Operations



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

119


U.S. Forces Assigned 

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

121

Operation Unified Protector



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

136


Conclusions

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

146

CHAPTER SIX

The British Experience: Operation Ellamy  

Christina Goulter

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

153

Introduction



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

153


Intervention and Initial UK Air Operations

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

154

The Transition to NATO Command



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

164


Lessons and Conclusions

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

175

CHAPTER SEVEN

The French Experience: Sarkozy’s War?  

Camille Grand

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

183

Introduction



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

183


Why and How Did France Decide to Act?

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

184

The French Military Engagement



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

190


Learning from Libya

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

199

Libya and the Future of Warfare: A Model for Future Conflicts?



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

202


Contents    vii

CHAPTER EIGHT

The Italian Experience: Pivotal and Underestimated  

Gregory Alegi

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

205

Introduction



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

205


The Political Scenario 

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

207

ITAF Situation and Doctrine



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

209


Operational Summary

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

212

Discussion and Conclusions



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

231


CHAPTER NINE

The Canadian Experience: Operation Mobile  

Richard O. Mayne

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

239

Introduction



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

239


Beyond Rhetoric, Taking Action

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

240

Ready to Act, but Awaiting Consensus



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

244


An Opportunity to Lead

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

247

Adaptability and Impact



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

249


Air Refueling and Long-Range Patrol

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

257

Assessing Operation Mobile 



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

261


RCAF and NATO: Lessons Observed

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

264

CHAPTER TEN

The Belgian, Danish, Dutch, and Norwegian Experiences  

Christian F. Anrig

  . . . . . . . . . .

267

Introduction



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

267


Background 

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

268

The Royal Danish Air Force



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

271


The Royal Norwegian Air Force

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

279

The Belgian Air Force



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

286


The Royal Netherlands Air Force

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

294

Lessons and Conclusions



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

300


CHAPTER ELEVEN

The Swedish Experience: Overcoming the Non–NATO-Member  

Conundrum  

Robert Egnell

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

309

Introduction



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

309


The Swedish Decision to Participate in the Intervention

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

311

The Swedish Contribution: “Operation Karakal”



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

315


Challenges to the Swedish Contribution

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

327

Conclusions and Recommendations



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

336


viii    Precision and Purpose: Airpower in the Libyan Civil War

CHAPTER TWELVE

The Arab States’ Experiences  

Bruce R. Nardulli

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

339

Introduction



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

339


The Road to Arab State Intervention 

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

340

Qatar, the UAE, and Jordan Join the Coalition



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

344


Air Combat Operations 

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

348

Arab Diplomatic and Political Pressure Continues



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

358


Direct Support to Opposition Ground Forces

  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

361

Stepping Up the Training and Air-Ground Integration 



  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

365


Observations, Lessons, and Remaining Questions

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

367



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   52


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling