Case studies on implementation in kenya, morocco, philippines


Download 0.81 Mb.

bet11/13
Sana26.11.2017
Hajmi0.81 Mb.
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13

Crop
Seed production 
Rate of use of  
(metric tonnes)
certified seed (%)
Rice
6,396
22.77
Hard yellow corn
771
10.06
Grains and legumes 
(beans, Lima beans, 
broad beans and peas)
75
0.57
Cereals (wheat and barley)
117
0.47
Potato
2,677
0.46
Table 4 
Seed Production and Rate of Use of Certified Seed per Crop 
(July 2006–August 2007)
Source: SENASA (2009).
Year
Paddy rice
Potato
Hard yellow 
Cereals 
Grain legumes 
corn
(wheat and barley)
(beans, Lima bean, 
broad beans and peas)
2001
301,230
248,238
304,578
302,974
231,153
2002
320,210
272,266
278,000
294,153
227,122
2003
315,938
262,912
292,982
290,794
225,361
2004
286,564
261,062
270,502
270,530
216,953
2005
353,056
267,896
286,881
286,976
232,575
2006
346,292
260,196
287,477
295,329
260,415
2007
351,155
292,736
306,460
309,078
264,022
Table 5 
Hectares planted with certified seed (2001-2007)
Source: SENASA (2009).

113
The multilateral system of access and benefit sharing
Case studies on implementation in Kenya, Morocco, Philippines and Peru
// PERU
Another reason for farmers’ limited participation in the formal seed system is a lack of confidence in the seed
that is sold as an alternative to the traditional sources. Farmers rely heavily on the information provided by
the supplier in terms of variety traits and seed quality. Small farmers are risk averse and rely mainly on their
traditional  seed  supply  systems:  ancient  selection  and  seed-handling  practices;  seed  exchange  in  the
community and with neighbouring farmers; seed fairs; local markets and ‘the route of seed’ or seed roads,
27
among others. These mechanisms are linked to relations of trust, interdependence and reciprocity that are
part of the cultural heritage and identity of rural communities. According to the studies by M. Hermann et
al. (2009), farmers primordially use their own seed storage in 80 percent of the cultivated areas. S. De Haan
(2009) also indicates in a study related to the exchange of native potato seeds in the central Andes region
that about 40 percent of the interviewed farmers use seed from their own sources.
A study conducted in 2008 on the implementation of farmers' rights in Peru highlights the slow disappearance
of  traditional  exchange  systems,  the  difficulty  for  farmers  to  access  high  quality  planting  material  of
traditional varieties and, most importantly, the gradual disappearance of the conservationist farmer (Scurrah,
Anderson and Winge, 2009). In order to change this situation, the study presents a series of measures: the
establishment of local or community seed banks, the initiation of seed fairs, the development of catalogues
documenting traditional local varieties and related knowledge, the development of exchange mechanisms,
the identification of high quality seed production farmers, the rehabilitation of old seed sources known for
their high quality, the guarantee of the quality of propagation material sources, the training of farmers for
breeding efforts and the promotion of participatory breeding. 
The INIA has taken some important steps towards the commercialization of quality seed of native crops and
varieties. In November 2008, the INIA adopted the necessary measures to register 61 native varieties of
potatoes in the National Register of Commercial Cultivars, allowing for the formal commercialization of their
seeds by farmers and other seed producers. The INIA’s action was a response to several failed attempts to
register some native potato varieties by farmers. In order to make the registration of traditional and farmers’
varieties affordable, the INIA and SENASA adopted specialized procedures and standards for the official
requirement of adaptability and efficiency of the varieties. In addition, the INIA and SENASA agreed that
native varieties would be exempted from paying the registration fee. For the same purpose, the Ministry of
Agriculture has created a National Register of Peruvian Native Potatoes, which is overseen by the INIA.
28
4. Peru’s participation in international germplasm exchange and conservation
initiatives
29
Since 1993, Peru has participated in two international plant genetic resources networks: the Andean Plant
Genetic Resources Network (REDARFIT),
30
a cooperative program for research and technology transfer, and
the Amazon Network for Genetic Resources (TROPIGEN),
31
which is primarily aimed at capacity building.
Peru’s annual contribution to the networks amounts to US $10,000 through the Inter-American Institute for
Cooperation on Agriculture’s (IICA) cooperative programs for agricultural research and technology transfer. 
In general, the importance of these networks is remarkable (and they should be further empowered): skills
are being developed, regional initiatives are gaining knowledge, regional projects for germplasm conservation
are being developed and proposals to increase added value are incoming. It is especially important for Peru
because of its participation in various collaborative projects that include international organizations and
counterparts in the Andean countries.
Participation in these networks result in benefits such as the strengthening of germplasm conservation, which
has led to the development of new collections and training on issues related to management and conservation
of germplasm (Rios, 2009).
32
In addition, participation in these networks has been useful to identify and
prioritize regional issues and crops for conservation, which was the case during the development of the
Hemispheric Strategy for Conservation of Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (Norgen Biotek
Corporation et al., 2008). The countries that participated in this strategy undertook an analysis of the status
of the ex situ collections for major crops in each country (indicating the conservation status of the accessions)

114
The multilateral system of access and benefit sharing
Case studies on implementation in Kenya, Morocco, Philippines and Peru
// PERU
and outlined a strategy for the conservation of PGRFA (collections of interest to developing countries were
prioritized  and  those  referring  to  crops  listed  in  Annex  I).  Subsequently,  the  Global  Trust  invited  the
individuals responsible for these collections to submit project proposals for regenerating and refreshing these
collections. In the case of Peru, collections of maize, cassava and beans were prioritized. Likewise, the broad
bean multiplication project was selected as a regional project, and this project was also implemented in
Ecuador. 
The projects following projects have been developed with the support of the Global Crop Diversity Trust: 
• the regeneration of the corn collection (Program for Corn Research and Social Impact by the UNALM);
• the regeneration of the national cassava collection (INIA); 
• the regeneration of the national bean collection (INIA) and
• the regeneration of the national broad bean collection (INIA).
33
These  projects  seek  to  help  institutions  reduce  the  number  of  accessions  that  require  regeneration,
characterization and duplication. The projects will in turn regenerate a duplicate of the collections for long-
term conservation in a germplasm bank that is internationally recognized (the CIP, the CIAT and so on and
optionally a deposit in a black box in Svalbard). 
Peru has also participated in networks sponsored by the International Fund for Agricultural Development;
the Andean Consortium (including Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru); the Inventive Systems
of World Heritage network (under the Global Environmental Facility and coordinated by the Food and
Agriculture Organization (FAO)); the Strengthening of Indigenous Organizations and Support for Knowledge
Rescue in High Andean Areas network (under the New Zealand government and the FAO), the Monitoring
System for In Situ Conservation and the Project of Agro-Biodiversity Conservation in the Farmers Fields
networks (the latter based on outputs of the former in situ project). Additionally, with the support of other
institutions such as Bioversity International, the Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, the European
Community  Commission,  the  Spanish  government,  the  Deutsche  Gesellschaft  fur  Internationale
Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) and the IICA, projects were developed for agricultural technology transfer, valuation
and sustainable use of PGRFA for both in situ and ex situ conservation. 
In general, although networks promote various collaborative activities, there has been to date no exchange
of materials or material transfer agreements being developed in this area. Usually, there are difficulties in
germplasm exchange among countries of the Andean region, especially for the development of new crops,
as a result of mistrust and fear of competing in the same markets and restrictions associated with national
access policies (Ramirez, 2008).
5. Information systems 
The agricultural sector in general is lacking a reliable information system that allows better management of
access and use of PGRFA. This gap is evident in the case of research centres: the documentation systems are
generally  inadequate,  and  there  is  little  coordination  at  the  regional  and  national  levels.  In  the  ex  situ
conservation centres, there is no standardized information system that interested parties can easily access in
order  to  identify  duplicated  samples,  potential  gaps  in  the  collections  and  collaborative  conservation
strategies. This situation has led to the isolation of researchers and has hindered communication with decision
makers  and  farmers  in  the  country.  The  result  is  a  poor  understanding  of  the  importance  of  PGRFA
conservation for the development of the country (that is, its benefits for nutrition and food security) – in
particular, the fragmentation and duplication of various research projects. 
Despite this discouraging situation, some efforts have been made to process information on genetic resources
and make it available to the public. The Catalogue of the National Collections of the Germplasm Bank, which
is published by the INIA’s Subdirección de Recursos Genéticos y Biotecnología, includes passport data from
22 of the 30 national collections. The digitalization of the data was done with support from the US Department

115
The multilateral system of access and benefit sharing
Case studies on implementation in Kenya, Morocco, Philippines and Peru
// PERU
of Agriculture, which has allowed it to adopt the Grin system. The National Registers of Native Potato and
Native  Corn  were  developed  with  free  access  to  the  Internet.
34
The  first  register  had  28  native  potato
descriptors and the second had 11 corn descriptors, both were developed with a participatory approach with
farmers and the academic community. These registers include an important innovation that allows for the
identification of the source of genetic material, such as the name and location of the farmer or the community
that provides the genetic material. 
It should be noted, however, that the vast amount of information on PGRFA and traditional knowledge as
well as on the practices obtained as a result of the Project on the In-situ Conservation of Native Crops and
Wild Relatives (2001-5) is still not available although the project was finalized in 2005. The main reasons for
this  delay  include  an  inability  to  get  the  system  operational;  a  lack  of  prior  informed  consent  by  the
communities and fears from participating institutions that misappropriation could occur.
In addition to these public information systems, there are other systems that are promoted jointly with civil
society aimed at collecting, processing and disseminating the agricultural information that is available in the
country (for researchers and producers). Examples include Infoandina and AgroRed Peru.
35
Specifically,
AgroRed Peru is a meta-information system that aims to promote, exchange and make effective use of
relevant  information  for  the  development  of  agriculture  in  the  country,  and  it  is  aimed  at  researchers,
academics,  technology  transfer  agents,  agricultural  and  rural  development  agents,  entrepreneurs  and
producers. 
6. Public awareness about PGRFA 
In increasing the public’s awareness about he use of PGRFA, communication networks developed from civil
society play a very important role. Of particular importance are the massive broadcasting efforts by the
Centro Peruano de Estudios Sociales (CEPES) through radio communication networks (Tierra Fecunda) and
the  publication  of  mass  distribution  magazines  (La  Revista  Agraria).  Also  of  great  importance  are  the
community networks that use radio as a tool for linking small-scale farmers and remote communities with
fewer resources. Among the latter, we can mention the network of rural communities of Cusco and Apurimac
(with 71 journalists and 210 radio stations and one regional information centre)
36
as well as the initiative of
the Pullasunchis Association – radio broadcasting in the Andean schools – which is also in the Cusco region.
37
At the national level, the information networks that use the Internet are important, including Servindi
(Intercultural Communication Services, 

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling