Cite this article: Immonen e-v, Ignatova I


Download 218.62 Kb.

Sana10.02.2018
Hajmi218.62 Kb.

rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org

Research


Cite this article: Immonen E-V, Ignatova I,

Gislen A, Warrant E, Va¨ha¨so¨yrinki M,

Weckstro¨m M, Frolov R. 2014 Large variation

among photoreceptors as the basis of visual

flexibility in the common backswimmer.

Proc. R. Soc. B 281: 20141177.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2014.1177

Received: 14 May 2014

Accepted: 1 September 2014

Subject Areas:

biophysics, neuroscience

Keywords:

Notonecta glauca, insect vision, photoreceptor

Author for correspondence:

Roman Frolov

e-mail: rvfrolov@gmail.com

These authors contributed equally to this



work.

Electronic supplementary material is available

at http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2014.1177 or

via http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org.

Large variation among photoreceptors

as the basis of visual flexibility in

the common backswimmer

Esa-Ville Immonen

1,†

, Irina Ignatova



1

, Anna Gislen

2

, Eric Warrant



2

,

Mikko Va¨ha¨so¨yrinki



1

, Matti Weckstro¨m

1

and Roman Frolov



1,†

1

Department of Physics, Biophysics and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, PO Box 3000, Oulun yliopisto 90014,



Finland

2

Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden



The common backswimmer, Notonecta glauca, uses vision by day and night

for functions such as underwater prey animal capture and flight in search of

new habitats. Although previous studies have identified some of the physio-

logical mechanisms facilitating such flexibility in the animal’s vision, neither

the biophysics of Notonecta photoreceptors nor possible cellular adaptations

are known. Here, we studied Notonecta photoreceptors using patch-clamp

and intracellular recording methods. Photoreceptor size (approximated by

capacitance) was positively correlated with absolute sensitivity and accep-

tance angles. Information rate measurements indicated that large and

more sensitive photoreceptors performed better than small ones. Our results

suggest that backswimmers are adapted for vision in both dim and well-

illuminated environments by having open-rhabdom eyes with large intrinsic

variation in absolute sensitivity among photoreceptors, exceeding those

found in purely diurnal or nocturnal species. Both electrophysiology and

microscopic analysis of retinal structure suggest two retinal subsystems: the

largest peripheral photoreceptors provide vision in dim light and the smaller

peripheral and central photoreceptors function primarily in sunlight, with

light-dependent pigment screening further contributing to adaptation in this

system by dynamically recruiting photoreceptors with varying sensitivity into

the operational pool.

1. Introduction

The visual system of Notonecta glauca, the common backswimmer, must provide

for numerous challenges arising from the insect’s diverse visual environments

and behavioural demands. Backswimmers prefer to live in freshwater ponds,

preying upon aquatic organisms as well as terrestrial insects of suitable size

that have fallen into the water. They are active around the clock, and use

their vision for underwater hunting as well as during flight in search of new

habitats. Because of its interesting behaviour and ecology [1– 4], the backswim-

mer’s vision has been broadly studied.

The backswimmer compound eye is an acone-type open-rhabdom apposi-

tion eye with corneal structure optimized for creating sharp images in both

air and water [5 –7]. There are two zones of high acuity in each eye, ventral

and dorsal, with 75% of ommatidia viewing a binocular visual field [6]. Each

ommatidium consists of two fused central rhabdomeres surrounded by a ring

of six detached different-sized peripheral rhabdomeres [8], and an adjustable

pigment aperture is present in front of the rhabdom [9]. Rhabdomeres of two

central photoreceptors are situated close to each other, with one of them located

more proximally than the other, as in the fly [8]. Microspectrophotometric

studies found three visual pigments in the rhabdomeres: peripheral

rhabdomeres contain a pigment with an extinction maximum at 560 nm

(coinciding with the intensity maximum of scattered background light in

turbid phytoplankton-rich water [10]) and with sensitivity to red light, whereas

&

2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.



 on February 9, 2018

http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 


central rhabdomeres contain pigments with extinction

maxima at 345 and 445 nm.

Very large differences in environmental light intensities

between day and night require different visual adaptations.

Many distinct adaptations have been described in the com-

pound eyes of nocturnal and diurnal insects, which help to

optimize visual performance to their respective ecological

niches. These include specializations in general eye design

(apposition versus superposition eye), lens and rhabdom

size, structure of the rhabdom (fused versus open rhabdom),

membrane dynamic filtering, transduction gain and neuronal

organization in the lamina [11–15]. Under low light

conditions, vision must be sufficiently sensitive to extract

information from dimly illuminated environments, while also

dealing with relatively high photon noise. Adaptations to noc-

turnal vision generally aim to improve sensitivity to light and

reliability of phototransduction, usually at the expense of

visual speed. In bright light, by contrast, photoreceptors

must be able to accommodate large changes in intensity pro-

duced by shading, highlights and the sun glinting off objects,

for example, without excessive saturation of the phototrans-

duction cascade and voltage responses. They also have to

reliably resolve small contrasts to make best use of the high

SNR afforded by abundant photons.

To deal with diurnal changes in illumination, many ani-

mals that use vision around the clock alter the structure of

their compound eyes, adapting the optics to prevent the

large numbers of microvilli that must be used at night to

trap scarce photons from making excessive metabolic

demands during the day [16 –18]. For instance, locusts and

Limulus rebuild their rhabdoms every day, with profound

modifications in photoreceptor biophysics, position and pig-

ment cell geometry [19– 21]. Indeed, Notonecta’s eye is

remarkably similar to the eye of another aquatic predator

that flies from pond to pond, the giant Asian water bug

Lethocerus [22], and to that of Tipulid flies [17,23]. Like

Notonecta, these species have an open (or partially open) rhab-

dom which moves closer to the lens at night to increase the

rhabdomeres’ angular subtense, and then back to the focal

plane during the day to narrow this angle. Photoreceptor

movements are accompanied by pigment cell movements

that open the entrance aperture at night and close it during

the day, when the pigment also shields the outer rhabdo-

meres. This type of eye is very effective at trading sensitivity

for angular sensitivity [24]. Similar work in Notonecta

prompted the suggestion that the larger outer rhabdomeres

could provide enough sensitivity for a scotopic system,

while the central rhabdomeres could support a higher acuity

photopic system [2–4,25].

However, despite the extensive morphological, physio-

logical and behavioural analyses conducted previously,

very little is known about the biophysical properties

of backswimmer photoreceptors, and adaptations to 24 h

vision at the photoreceptor and ommatidial levels. Here,

we recorded in vitro and in vivo from Notonecta photo-

receptors using patch-clamp and intracellular recording

methods, and used microscopy to assess the rhabdomere

and pigment cell migration associated with different adap-

tation states. Our results indicate that backswimmers can

see in both dark and brightly lit environments due to (i) large

intrinsic variations in the properties of peripheral photo-

receptors and (ii) robust migration of screening pigment

and photoreceptors.

2. Material and methods

(a) Patch-clamp recordings from photoreceptors in

dissociated ommatidia

Adult backswimmers (N. glauca) were collected locally (Oulu,

Lund) or purchased from Blades Biological (UK). Dissociation of

ommatidia (electronic supplementary material, figure S1) and elec-

trophysiological

recordings

were


performed

as

described



previously [26–28]. In brief, an Axopatch 1-D patch-clamp amplifier

and


P

C

LAMP



v. 9.2 software (Axon Instruments/Molecular Devices,

CA, USA) were used for data acquisition and analysis. Patch electro-

des (made from borosilicate glass; World Precision Instruments,

Sarasota, FL, USA) had resistance of 3–8 MV. Bath solution con-

tained (in mM): 120 NaCl, 5 KCl, 4 MgCl

2

, 1.5 CaCl



2

, 10 N-Tris-

(hydroxymethyl)-methyl-2-amino-ethanesulfoncic acid (TES), 25

proline and 5 alanine, pH 7.15. Patch pipette solution contained

(in mM): 140 KCl, 10 TES, 2 MgCl

2

, 4 Mg-ATP, 0.4 Na-GTP and 1



NAD, pH 7.15. All chemicals were purchased from Sigma Aldrich

(St. Louis, MO, USA). The liquid junction potential (LJP) between

the bath and the normal intracellular solution was 24 mV. All vol-

tage values cited in text were corrected for the LJP. Series

resistance was compensated by 80%. All cells had resting potentials

of 244 mV or lower (the average resting potential was 254.9 +

8.6 mV; n ¼ 23); if photoreceptor condition deteriorated during

recordings to give a resting potential of 244 mV or higher, voltage

recordings were discontinued.

(b) In vivo intracellular single-electrode recordings

In vivo intracellular single-electrode recordings were performed

as described previously [29]. In brief, for intracellular recordings,

backswimmers were maintained in reversed 12–12 illumination

conditions with a subjective ‘night’ period matching the actual

day (regimen 2; see below for details). Photoreceptor responses

were recorded using microelectrodes (aluminosilicate glass; Har-

vard Apparatus, UK) manufactured with a laser puller (P-2000;

Sutter Instrument, USA) and filled with 2 M KCL solution to a

final resistance of 80–110 MV). Signals were amplified with an

intracellular amplifier (SEC-05L; NPI, Germany). Before recording

the angular sensitivity, the optical axis of the photoreceptor was

determined by changing the polar and azimuthal angles of the

light source while recording light responses in a Cardan-arm

system. Then the V-log(I) curve was plotted to obtain the stimulus

intensity eliciting the half-maximum response. This light intensity

(and a 10-fold higher intensity) was used to measure the receptive

field of the photoreceptor by changing the polar angle. Voltage

responses, measured at different angles, were converted to angu-

lar sensitivity after the correction for the azimuthal angle. The

angular diameter of the light source was approximately 18.

Recordings were performed mainly but not exclusively from

the central part of the eye; no notable differences in photo-

receptor properties were observed between different parts of

the eye. All cells used for analysis had resting potentials of

2

45 mV or lower, showed single angular sensitivity peaks and



demonstrated transient depolarization with the zero attenuation

filter of at least 22 mV in amplitude (at least 35 mV at the maxi-

mal light intensity); in addition, in current-clamp experiments

involving current injections to determine capacitance, only cells

showing strong rectification without any recording artefacts

were used to ensure that capacitance was not overestimated

due to electrode blockage.

Light stimulation was performed as described previously [28].

In brief, a computer-controlled custom-made voltage-to-current

driver for light-emitting diodes (LEDs) was used to drive 10 (in

patch-clamp experiments) or 13 (in intracellular experiments)

monochromatic LEDs (Roithner Laser Technik, Austria), covering

a range from 355 to 639 nm, which were used in combination

with neutral density filters (Kodak, New York, NY, USA). In

rspb.r

oy

alsocietypublishing.org



Pr

oc.


R.

Soc.


B

281


:

20141177


2

 on February 9, 2018

http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 



patch-clamp experiments, full-field stimuli were delivered to

dissociated ommatidia through the inverted microscope objective.

(c) Pupil sizes and rhabdomere migration

For experiments with pseudopupil adjustment and rhabdomere

migration, half the population was maintained under normal

12–12 illumination conditions (regimen 1), whereas the rest lived

in regimen 2 so that animals in both night and day pupil adap-

tation states [2] could be studied during day-time. To test

adaptation to bright sunlight, the regimen 1 animals were placed

in direct sunlight for 3 h. To obtain fully dark-adapted animals,

another sample of backswimmers maintained under regimen 2

was placed in a dark box for the same period. Animals adapted

to laboratory light were obtained in similar way. Following the

exposure, backswimmers were killed and their heads were fixed

in 4% paraformaldehyde in phosphate-buffered saline sup-

plemented with 3% sucrose. After rinsing, dehydration and

embedding in Spurr’s embedding medium, 4 mm sections were

cut and mounted with Entellan (Merck, Germany).

(d) Data analysis

Information rates were analysed using the Shannon method [30]

as described previously [28,31]. In brief, to measure photo-

receptor performance, a computer-generated 90 s light contrast

series, made of 30 s long steady light pre-pulse followed by a

test pulse consisting of 30 repetitions of a 2 s Gaussian randomly

modulated (white-noise, WN) sequence with a cut-off frequency

of 200 Hz was used to obtain information rates (IRs). Analysis of

responses to WN stimulation was performed by estimating the

2 s signal S(f ) by averaging voltage responses to thirty 2 s long

segments of the stimulus. The noise was then obtained by sub-

tracting the signal estimate from the original (noise-containing)

sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR(f )) was obtained in

the frequency domain as SNR(f ) ¼ jS(f )j

2

/jN(f )j


2

, where jS(f )j

2

is the estimated response signal power spectrum and N(f )j



2

is

the estimated noise power spectrum. The contrast gain of voltage



responses jT(f )j was calculated by dividing the cross-spectrum of

photoreceptor input (WN contrast, C(f )) and output ( photo-

receptor signal) S(f ).C*(f ) (the asterisk denoting complex

conjugate) by the autospectrum of the input C(f ).C*(f ) and

taking the absolute value of the resulting frequency response

function T(f): T(f) ¼ S(f).C*(f)/C(f).C*(f). The Shannon IR for

WN modulated responses was calculated according to the equation

IR ¼


Ð

(log


2

[jS(f)j/jN(f)j þ 1])df within a frequency range from

1 Hz to a frequency where the value of SNR equalled 0.5.

All values are means + s.d. Spearman’s rank correlation coef-

ficient (

r

) was calculated as described previously [32]. Spearman’s



r

was considered significantly different from zero when the

p-value calculated by using the large-sample approximation test

in M


ATLAB

was less than 0.05.

3. Results

(a) General properties of backswimmer photoreceptors

Basic features of photoreceptor function were first investigated

with the patch-clamp method in isolated ommatidia. Figure 1a

shows examples of action spectra obtained in patch-clamp

recordings. Of 34 photoreceptors, two cells demonstrated

responses to UV light only (figure 1a, represented by violet

trace); two cells had a response maximum at 435 nm (blue

trace); one cell had a response maximum at 470 nm (cyan

trace); the remaining cells exhibited strongest responses to

LEDs with maxima between 490 and 591 nm (green and

dark yellow traces), and with an average response maximum

at 535 nm. Figure 1b shows examples of microscopic current

responses, the quantum bumps elicited by 1 ms flashes of

light with enough intensity to evoke responses with approxi-

mately 50% success rate. The average quantum bump

amplitude was 247.2 + 19.2 pA (n ¼ 26). In patch-clamp, vol-

tage bumps were present in all photoreceptors at rest upon

stimulation by steady low-intensity light. Voltage bump

amplitude usually varied from 0.5 to 2 mV.

Figure 1c shows macroscopic voltage and light-induced

current (LIC) responses to a naturalistic stimulus. Figure 1d

quantifies transient and sustained depolarization during

400


0

3

6



0.5 nA

200 ms


10

mV

–0.25 nA



time (s)

9

12



15

0

–10



–20

–30


–40

v

oltage (mV)



current (nA)

–50


–3

–2

–1



0

0

400



800

capacitance (pF)

no. cells

1200


2

4

6



8

10

12



14

16

18



patch-clamp

intracellular

0.2

0.4


0.6

0.8


1.0

500


(a)

(c)

(e)

)

()

(b)

norm. LIC response

wavelength (nm)

600

100 ms


peak, side-on

peak, optics

plateau, side-on

plateau, optics

30

pA

–7 –6 –5 –4



log (I/I

0

)



–3 –2 –1 0

depolarization (mV)

50

40

30



20

10

0



Figure 1. General properties of backswimmer photoreceptors. (a) Action

spectra derived from LIC responses elicited by 20 ms flashes of different-

wavelength LEDs in patch-clamp experiments (here and elsewhere, all exper-

iments involving voltage-clamp were performed in patch-clamp mode). Cells

were held at a holding potential (HP) of

274 mV; the stimulus intensity for

each LED was calculated to yield an equal number of incident photons per

second. Violet, blue, light blue, green and dark yellow traces represent typical

responses of backswimmer green photoreceptors. (b) Examples of current

quantum bumps elicited by 1 ms flashes of light (green arrows) at a HP

of

274 mV. (c) Macroscopic voltage and LIC responses elicited by a natur-



alistic contrast (grey trace) at four light intensities, from 20 (black) to 20

000 (blue) effective photons s

21

; data from the same cell are shown. (d )



Transient (‘peak’) and steady-state (‘plateau’) depolarization of green photo-

receptors at different light intensities elicited by steady pulses of light in

patch-clamp (‘side-on’) and intracellular (‘optics’) experiments ( patch-

clamp: n ¼ 9; intracellular: n ¼ 18). (e) Typical voltage responses to current

injections in intracellular experiments. (f ) Distributions of photoreceptor

capacitance values obtained in patch-clamp and intracellular experiments.

rspb.r

oy

alsocietypublishing.org



Pr

oc.


R.

Soc.


B

281


:

20141177


3

 on February 9, 2018

http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 



light responses of dark-adapted photoreceptors to steady

light of increasing intensity in patch-clamp and intracellular

experiments. The differences in depolarization amplitudes

were apparently caused by dissimilar illumination conditions

(side-on stimulation of dissociated ommatidia in vitro versus

natural illumination through optics with intact pigment

screening in intracellular experiments).

Consistent with previous studies documenting significant

differences in the size of individual rhabdomeres [8], back-

swimmer photoreceptors exhibited large variation in whole-

cell capacitance. Capacitance was measured both in vitro, in

voltage-clamp experiments (patch-clamp) by calculating the

charge under the capacitive transient following a small

voltage step, and in vivo, in intracellular current-clamp exper-

iments involving current injections (figure 1e), from the time

constant. In patch-clamp experiments, whole-cell capacitance

varied from 107 to 907 pF with a median of 247 (190–369) pF

(interquartile range) (n ¼ 38), whereas intracellular recording

capacitance varied from 262 to 1120 pF with a median of 379

(303–507) pF (n ¼ 36) (figure 1f ).

In Notonecta photoreceptors, the depolarizing effects of

LIC were opposed by two K

þ

currents, a rapidly activating



and inactivating (I

A

), and a very slowly inactivating delayed



rectifier current (I

DR

) (electronic supplementary material,



figure S2). I

DR

showed almost no inactivation within the phys-



iological voltage range (approx. between 270 and 220 mV).

I

A



was sensitive to 4-AP and in most cells could be completely

abolished by a 2 s inactivating pre-pulse to 234 mV. Peak con-

ductances and half-activation potentials (V

a

1/2



, determined by

fitting the data points with a Boltzmann function) of these cur-

rents were of similar magnitude (electronic supplementary

material, figure S2d). The values of V

a

1/2


were 225.2 +

3.7 mV for I

A

and 223.8 + 6.3 mV for I



DR

(n ¼ 7).


(b) Absolute sensitivity

We found a large variation in absolute sensitivity among green

photoreceptors. Sensitivity was measured in patch-clamp

experiments by counting voltage bumps evoked by continuous

stimulation at light intensities dim enough to elicit less than

10 bumps s

2

1

(less than 5 bumps s



2

1

on average) in order to



avoid overlapping bumps. For each photoreceptor, sensitivity

to light was defined as a reciprocal of the light intensity that

would induce 1 effective photon s

2

1



(i.e. 1 bump s

2

1



). The rela-

tive light sensitivity was then calculated as a fraction of

sensitivity of the most sensitive cell in the sample. Strong corre-

lation was found between sensitivity and the corresponding

capacitance value (r ¼ 0.76, p ¼ 0.00011; figure 2).

(c) Photoreceptor performance in bright light

To evaluate photoreceptor performance and information pro-

cessing, we used a 90 s WN contrast sequence to stimulate

photoreceptors over a range of light intensities from a sensi-

tivity threshold to a saturating intensity (figure 3). Responses

to WN modulated light are shown in figure 3. Photoreceptor

depolarization increased, bump noise decreased and contrast

resolution improved with increasing light intensity, up to the

level of bright light (around 400 000 effective photons s

2

1

in



figure 3a). Consistent with these changes, contrast gain and

information rate also increased (figure 3b,c). The maximal

gain was 15.0 + 4.4 mV per unit of contrast with an average

50% cut-off frequency of 14.1 + 5.0 Hz (n ¼ 11). The maximal

average IR (IR

max


) was 87 + 42 bits s

2

1



(n ¼ 23). In still brighter

light, photoreceptor performance deteriorated again, reflecting

saturation of transduction units in bright light as a consequence

of stimulating dissociated ommatidia deprived of optical adap-

tation mechanisms [33,34]. This decrease in the IR in very bright

environments is very similar to that observed in photoreceptors

of dissociated stick insect, cricket and water strider ommatidia

[28,31,35], and consistent with the saturation effects observed in

white-eyed blowflies and Drosophila [36,37].

200


10

–3

10



–2

10

–1



1

400


capacitance (pF)

relati


v

e sensiti

vity

600


800

Figure 2. Absolute photoreceptor sensitivity in patch-clamp experiments.

Scatter plot illustrates correlation between sensitivity and membrane

capacitance.

0

1

10



10

10

2



10

4

10



6

frequency (Hz)

effective photons s

–1

100



300

500


capacitance (pF)

IR

max



 (bits

s

–1



)

700


900

IR (bits


s

–1

)



100

–50


15

12

9



6

3

gain (mV)



0

0

10



–2

10

–3



10

–1

1



relative sensitivity

0

30



60

90

120



150

180


20

40

60



80

100


120

IR

max


–40

–30


–20

–10


(a)

(b)

(c)

(e)

0

30

60



90

120


150

180


()

4

eff. phs s



–1

:

40



400

4000


40 000

400 000


4 000 000

20

v



oltage (mV)

40

time (s)



60

80

Figure 3. Responses to WN modulated contrast in patch-clamp experiments.



(a) Voltage responses to a 60 s WN modulated contrast light stimulus with a

preceding 30 s adapting pre-pulse (grey trace); intensity of the stimulus

increased from four effective photons s

21

in 10-fold increments from a



black to a cyan voltage trace. (b) Contrast gain functions are shown for

the corresponding voltage responses. (c) Changes in the maximum Shannon

information rate with increasing light intensity. In (a – c) data from the same

photoreceptor are shown. (d,e) Scatter plots show photoreceptor IR

max

values


as a function of either (d ) membrane capacitance or (e) relative sensitivity to

light.


rspb.r

oy

alsocietypublishing.org



Pr

oc.


R.

Soc.


B

281


:

20141177


4

 on February 9, 2018

http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 



The functional importance of photoreceptor size and its

variation, already demonstrated in the correlation between

sensitivity to light and whole-cell capacitance (figure 2), was

supported by two additional observations: larger and more

sensitive backswimmer photoreceptors had higher IR

max


values than their smaller and less sensitive counterparts (r ¼

0.57, p ¼ 0.0045 for the correlation between capacitance and

IR

max


, n ¼ 23 cells; r ¼ 0.70, p ¼ 0.0024 for the correlation

between the relative sensitivity and IR

max

, n ¼ 16 cells; figure



3d,e), which might be a useful development considering the

relatively small number of photoreceptors capable of seeing

in very dim environments.

(d) In vivo recordings: capacitance, angular sensitivity

and absolute sensitivity

While patch-clamp experiments allow characterization of

biophysical properties of photoreceptors without the bias

introduced by ommatidial optics, functional interpretation of

the discovered variations in the key properties of backswim-

mer photoreceptors (capacitance, absolute sensitivity and

performance) is compromised by the fact that our patch-

clamp preparation required side-on illumination, which is

non-physiological for photoreceptors, and does not take into

account angular sensitivity.

To determine whether larger photoreceptors, characterized

by higher absolute sensitivity in the in vitro experiments, have

higher absolute and angular sensitivities than their smaller

counterparts in vivo, intracellular recordings were performed

from backswimmers maintained under reverse illumination

conditions (to maximize the expected variation in acceptance

angles). The above-cited capacitance values (figure 1f ) calcu-

lated from voltage responses tended to be higher than

capacitance values obtained in voltage-clamp experiments,

possibly due to underestimation of the cellular resistance,

caused by an electrode-induced leak, leading to overestimation

of capacitance. Also, in vitro capacitance can be underestimated

due to the loss of axonal membrane or space-clamp error. How-

ever, as anticipated on the basis of the patch-clamp recordings

and previous hypotheses, there was large variation in accep-

tance angle values among photoreceptors (figure 4a,b), from

2.888 to 12.438 pF with a median of 4.98 (4.0–6.08) (n ¼ 41). A

moderate positive correlation was found between capacitance

and acceptance angle values (r ¼ 0.45, p ¼ 0.038, n ¼ 21;

figure 4c, open circles). A slightly higher correlation was

found in a different sample with a 10-fold higher stimulus

intensity, which produced wider acceptance angles (r ¼ 0.61,

p ¼ 0.01, n ¼ 17; figure 4c, closed circles).

To determine the absolute sensitivity in intracellular

recordings, we first attempted to calculate it directly, by count-

ing voltage bumps, as in patch-clamp experiments. However, it

was not feasible to resolve individual bumps regularly enough

due to the relatively high noise and the small bump amplitude.

Therefore, we used a more indirect measure of steady-state

depolarization in dim light. Figure 4d demonstrates the exper-

imental steady-state depolarization curves with red dashed

lines illustrating the types of thresholds that we used to deter-

mine the correlation between acceptance angles and absolute

sensitivity. Statistically significant positive correlations were

found between acceptance angle and light intensity at which

the photoreceptor depolarized by 0.5 or 1 mV (the values

were obtained from fitted parameters; correspondingly, r ¼

0.63, p ¼ 0.0024 and r ¼ 0.61, p ¼ 0.0034, n ¼ 21; figure 4e).

As in patch-clamp experiments, sensitivity varied more than

100-fold, depending on the threshold used. Also, there were

significant correlations between the acceptance angle and

steady-state depolarization at a specified light intensity

threshold (r ¼ 0.73, p ¼ 0.0002 for the attenuation ‘–3’; and

r ¼


0.49, p ¼ 0.025 for the attenuation ‘–2’, n ¼ 21; figure 4f ).

However, it should be noted that the depolarization level

depends on bump frequency, quantum bump size, membrane

gain (determined by input resistance, affected, for example, by

the voltage-activated conductances), voltage-dependence of

gain (determined by voltage-dependencies of ion channels)

and voltage bump amplitude. Because all these parameters

may vary from cell to cell, these steady-state depolarization

metrics probably underestimated the correlation between

acceptance angles and absolute sensitivity of backswimmer

photoreceptors.

(e) Central rhabdomeres

Two central photoreceptors in each ommatidium contain either

a UV- or a blue-sensitive pigment [38]. Because they seem to

–15

(c)



(e)

()

0

0

2



4

6

8



10

12

14



16

0.2


0.4

0.6


0.8

1.0


–10

rel. light int.:

1

10

steady-state



depolarization

1 mV


0.5 mV

‘–2’


‘–3’

–5

angular sensitivity



acceptance angle

no. cells

0

2

4



6

8

10



12

v

o



ltage (mV)

2

–1



–2

–3

–4



–5

200


1 mV

0.5 mV


400 600

capacitance (pF)

log (

I/

I

0

)



)

depolarization (mV)

log (I/I

0

)



800 1000

–5

–4



–3

–2

–1



0

4

6



8

10

12



14

acceptance angle

(a)

(b)

relati

v

e response



3.1°

6.5°


9.5°

0

5



10

2

4



6

8

10 12 14



acceptance angle

2

4



6

8

10



12

attenuation ‘–3’

attenuation ‘–2’

0

–1



–2

–3

–4



acceptance angle

2

4



6

8

10



12

Figure 4. Cell size, angular sensitivity and absolute sensitivity in vivo. (a)

Examples of normalized angular sensitivity functions of different photoreceptors;

dotted line shows the 50% voltage response level at which the acceptance angle

was determined. (b) Distribution of acceptance angle values. (c) Correlations

between photoreceptor capacitance and acceptance angle for two experimental

samples at different light intensities (see Results). (d ) Variation in steady-state

depolarization responses (n ¼ 21) with definition of thresholds used to infer

absolute sensitivities. (e) Correlations between acceptance angle and the light

intensities at which steady-state depolarization reaches either 0.5 or 1 mV.

(f ) Correlations between acceptance angles and plateau voltage at two light

intensities (attenuations ‘ – 2’ and ‘ – 3’).

rspb.r

oy

alsocietypublishing.org



Pr

oc.


R.

Soc.


B

281


:

20141177


5

 on February 9, 2018

http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 



perform a different function than the green peripheral photo-

receptors, being responsible for colour vision (e.g. [39]), we

compared their electrophysiological properties. Only five

UV-, violet- and blue-sensitive photoreceptors were success-

fully patched, due to their difficult position within the

ommatidium. No differences between green photoreceptors

and the small sample of UV and blue cells were found in

terms of capacitance, ionic currents or information rates.

Three intracellular recordings of blue cells were made from

intact retinas. All were characterized by relatively small

acceptance angles (around 58) and low absolute sensitivities.

(f ) The pupil in light microscopy

To see which photoreceptors receive light in different illumi-

nation conditions, we used light microscopy to examine

backswimmer retinas adapted to different conditions. Anato-

mically, it appears that in bright light (figure 5a,d), screening

pigment acts as a pupil and may restrict light to the small

central rhabdomeres, whereas in dark-adapted eyes (figure

5c,e) the pigment moves away so that light can enter all rhab-

domeres. Specifically, in the light-adapted eye, a light-

guiding tract about 5–8 mm in diameter and 10 mm long is

formed between heavily pigmented pigment cells (figure

5d). In the dark-adapted state, the tract is completely absent

and the rhabdomeres are about 40 mm closer to the cornea

than in the day-adapted eye, and indent into the cone cells

(figure 5a). These movements may have an intrinsic diurnal

rhythm as well, as can be seen in the intermediate position

of the pigments in the dark-adapted state during subjective

day when compared with the dark-adapted pupil during

subjective night (figure 5b,c). Adjustment of the pupil implies

that the central and peripheral rhabdomeres have performance

optima at different light levels.

4. Discussion

In this work, we studied the electrophysiological properties

of backswimmer photoreceptors in an attempt to determine

the mechanisms that allow the animal to use vision under

dramatically different illumination conditions, such as those

experienced during day and night. Our results, documenting

large variations among individual photoreceptors in capaci-

tance, absolute sensitivity to light and angular sensitivity,

with substantial positive correlations between these pro-

perties, are fully consistent with the previously reported

variation in the size of individual rhabdomeres in backswim-

mer ommatidia [5,8]. Although the general anatomical design

of the backswimmer eye is optimized for vision in well-lit

backgrounds (open-rhabdom apposition eye), the presence

in each ommatidium of two large peripheral green-sensitive

rhabdomeres with wide acceptance angle (the angle sub-

tended by the photoreceptor entrance aperture), and hence

a small F-number, and with relatively high absolute sensi-

tivity, can be considered as an adaptation for vision in the

dark. One puzzling issue was the apparent scarcity of very

large photoreceptors in our experiments. A reason for that

could be that large peripheral photoreceptors differ in rhab-

dom length (and therefore capacitance), or that there is

variation in photoreceptor size across the eye resulting in

relatively smooth experimental capacitance distribution.

As the large variation in absolute sensitivity and its corre-

lation with capacitance are central to our argument, these

findings must answer three main questions: (i) whether the

variation in absolute sensitivity and its correlation with

capacitance are real; (ii) whether the variation in absolute sen-

sitivity has any functional importance; and (iii) whether it is

possible to explain variation in absolute sensitivity largely or

fully by variation in other presently determined factors (e.g.

(a)

c

r

r



c

cc

cc



(b)

(c)

()

(e)

Figure 5. Pigment screening in different adaptation states. Micrographs of cross-sections made in the distal-most part of the ommatidium directly under the cone in

three adaptation states of the pupil: (a) sunlight- and (b) laboratory-light-adapted during subjective day, and (c) dark-adapted during subjective night; scale bars,

5

mm. Inset schematic pictures illustrate the estimated position of the pigment diaphragm (circle) in relation to the photoreceptors. (d,e) Pigment screening and



rhabdomere migration with schematic diagrams. Retinal sections are shown for (d ) sunlight- and (e) dark-adapted backswimmers; c, cornea; cc, cellular cone; r,

rhabdom; scale bars, 20

mm; different cornea appearances in (d,e) are imaging artefacts.

rspb.r


oy

alsocietypublishing.org

Pr

oc.


R.

Soc.


B

281


:

20141177


6

 on February 9, 2018

http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 



photoreceptor capacitance). Our results suggest that the

answers to these questions are respectively ‘yes’, ‘yes’ and ‘no’.

Figure 6 shows N. glauca absolute sensitivity–capacitance

correlation alongside identical data obtained by us previously

in three other, not very closely related species in patch-clamp

experiments under the same conditions, which to the best of

our knowledge constitute the only data of this kind on invert-

ebrate photoreceptors available in the literature. Importantly,

all these species have different visual ecologies: the stick

insect Carausius morosus is strictly nocturnal, the water strider

Gerris lacustris is strictly diurnal, and the American cockroach

Periplaneta americana is active during twilight and night-time.

All these species demonstrate strong positive correlations

between absolute sensitivity and capacitance [28,31] (P. ameri-

cana sensitivity and capacitance values were obtained from

the dataset as published by Immonen et al. [40]). In fact, this

was found in all insect species where we addressed this issue,

without exception. These results reinforce the validity of

findings reported in this article.

Regarding the second question, it is apparent from figure 6

that (i) sensitivity of the diurnal G. lacustris is much lower than

that of the nocturnal C. morosus, (ii) sensitivity ranges for both

the water strider and the stick insect are substantially smaller

than those for the backswimmer and cockroach, and (iii) photo-

receptor sensitivity ranges of the backswimmer and cockroach

exceed those of the water strider and stick insect. Therefore, it is

clear from these data that some green-sensitive peripheral

photoreceptors in the backswimmer (and in the cockroach)

function very much like the highly sensitive photoreceptors

of the nocturnal stick insect, whereas others have much lower

sensitivity like those observed in the water strider. This pattern

implies that the variation in absolute sensitivity in N. glauca is

of functional importance.

However, absolute sensitivity varied more than 100-fold,

while capacitance varied approximately 10-fold. Considering

the obviously linear relationship between absolute sensiti-

vity and capacitance, the variation in capacitance alone can

apparently explain only a minor fraction of the variation in

sensitivity. This discrepancy suggests that some other fac-

tors regulating absolute sensitivity (e.g. photosensitive and

screening pigment densities, rhodopsin/metarhodopsin equi-

librium, quantum efficiency, microvillus recovery periods,

etc.) may also positively or negatively correlate with photo-

receptor size, which might explain why we have consistently

observed strong correlations between these two photoreceptor

properties in different insect species. In this regard, it is inter-

esting that in all species presented in figure 6, the variations

in sensitivity are similarly proportional to the variations in

capacitance: if we quantify each correlation by first obtaining

the interquartile ranges for both sensitivity and capacitance,

and then divide the interquartile range for absolute sensitivity

by that for the capacitance variation, the resulting ratios are

similar: 0.0072 for the cockroach, 0.0088 for the backswimmer,

0.0092 for the stick insect and 0.0139 for the water strider

(although in the latter case there were two classes of peripheral

photoreceptors, blue and green, characterized by different

absolute sensitivities and average capacitances) [31].

Our estimates made from micrographs of backswimmer

ommatidia [8] indicate that the cross-sectional area of the lar-

gest pair of rhabdoms is three times greater than that of the

smallest pair. However, in vivo sensitivity depends, among

other factors, on the product of two probabilities: the prob-

ability of a photon entering the rhabdom (which increases

with the cross-sectional area of the rhabdom, especially at the

distal end) and the probability that rhodopsin absorbs a

photon entering the rhabdom (which depends on the length

of the rhabdom). In dark, the latter probability seems to be

more important, while in bright light it is the entrance aperture

size that determines sensitivity. As sensitivity is proportional to

the rhabdom membrane area, the threefold difference between

the largest and smallest rhabdomeres means that either the

wide rhabdomeres should be substantially longer than their

narrow counterparts (to accommodate more microvilli) or that

other factors, such as those listed above, should disproportion-

ally boost the sensitivity of the largest rhabdomeres or reduce

the sensitivity of the smallest ones.

Backswimmers generally prefer to swim or rest on the water

surface, often in direct sunlight. To prevent photoreceptor

saturation in such conditions, their light attenuation mechan-

isms must be sufficiently strong. One such mechanism is the

dynamic screening by pigment cells situated at the distal end

of the ommatidium and forming the pupil [2]. Figure 5 shows

cross-sections of the backswimmer pupil in three adaptation

states: dark-adapted during night, light-adapted to bright

laboratory illumination during the day and light-adapted to

sunlight. The pigment diaphragm is fully open in the dark, par-

tially closed in laboratory light and completely shields the

peripheral rhabdomeres in sunlight. Note that the pigment

cell movement was accompanied by proximal migration of

rhabdomeres (figure 5d,e). These observations on rhabdomere

and pigment cell movement mirror findings made in the

giant water bug Lethocerus [41]. The sensitivity range of the

backswimmer pseudopupil is very large, about 7 log units

during the day and 6 log units during night, with the total

range reaching 8 log units [2]. For comparison, the diurnal

blowfly has a pupil dynamic range of 3 log units [34], and the

strictly nocturnal moth Hydraecia micacea has a range of 4 log

units [42]. Obviously, such a large range reflects the need to

use vision both during the day and at night in the backswim-

mer. Interestingly, shielding of peripheral photoreceptors not

only protects the peripheral photoreceptors from bright light,

but also enables them to function at otherwise saturating back-

grounds, as evidenced by the finding that peripheral

0

10



–2

10

–1



1

10

200



400

capacitance (pF)

sensiti

vity (b


umps

s

–1



)

600


N. glauca

C. morosus

G. lacustris

P. americana

800


Figure 6. In vitro absolute sensitivity in species with different visual ecol-

ogies. Correlations between absolute sensitivity and capacitance are shown

for four insects: N. glauca, the stick insect C. morosus [28], the water strider

G. lacustris [31] and the American cockroach P. americana; data are presented

for adult specimens only; in the case of P. americana, the same dataset was

used to extract sensitivity values as published by Immonen et al. [40]. Data

are presented in terms of bumps s

21

at the light level corresponding to the



level – 7 in figure 1d.

rspb.r


oy

alsocietypublishing.org

Pr

oc.


R.

Soc.


B

281


:

20141177


7

 on February 9, 2018

http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 



photoreceptors can mediate optomotor reactions even in bright

light, when they are shaded by the pigment diaphragm [25].

(Although the attenuation strength of shielding pigment filter-

ing in the backswimmer is not known it might be similar to

that in diurnal flies, i.e. between 2 and 3 decades [33].) The prox-

imal rhabdomere migration should also act as a pupil,

providing additional attenuation, although its strength was

not evaluated in this study.

Overall, combining previous studies with our results

suggests that the backswimmer’s retina can be functionally sep-

arated into at least two photoreceptor subsystems. The first

would consist of the largest and most sensitive peripheral

photoreceptors. These are sensitive to green and allow the back-

swimmer to see in dim light. The second subsystem would

consist of the smaller peripheral and central photoreceptors,

and would be used for vision in bright light and during

flight. Even though the operational ranges of these subsystems

are expected to overlap substantially, such a classification could

be merited by consistent differences in several respects: large

green-sensitive photoreceptors are generally also more sensitive

to light, and have larger acceptance angles, slower membrane

responses and higher IR

max

than the smaller photoreceptors.



Even though little is known about the properties of central

photoreceptors, it appears that they are similar to the properties

of peripheral ones, but because pigment screening cannot

shield them even in the brightest light, they should have

lower sensitivity to light than peripheral photoreceptors

in order to avoid saturation in sunlight. In this context, it is

interesting that the rhabdom of one of the two central photo-

receptors is always situated proximally to the other [8], which

necessarily entails lower sensitivity to light due to a lower

photon flux. This raises the possibility that the functions of

the central rhabdomeres are also optimized to different back-

grounds—the proximal rhabdomere may continue to function

when the distally situated rhabdomere is already saturated.

Data accessibility.

The data supporting the article are available in the

electronic supplementary material.

Acknowledgements.

The authors thank Prof. Andrew French for proof-

reading of the manuscript and valuable suggestions.

Funding statement.

This research was supported by Academy of Finland

grants to R.F. and M.W.

References

1.

Lang HH. 1980 Surface wave discrimination



between prey and nonprey by the back swimmer

Notonecta glauca L. (Hemiptera, Heteroptera).

Behav. Ecol. Sociobiol. 6, 233 – 246. (doi:10.1007/

BF00569205)

2.

Ro AI, Nilsson DE. 1995 Pupil adjustments in the



eye of the common backswimmer. J. Exp. Biol. 198,

71 – 77.


3.

Schwind R. 1984 The plunge reaction of the

backswimmer Notonecta glauca. J. Comp. Physiol.

155, 319 – 321. (doi:10.1007/BF00610585)

4.

Schwind R. 1983 A polarization-sensitive response of



the flying water bug Notonecta glauca to UV-light.

J. Comp. Physiol. 150, 87–91. (doi:10.1007/

BF00605291)

5.

Fischer C, Mahner M, Wachmann E. 2000 The



rhabdom structure in the ommatidia of the

Heteroptera (Insecta), and its phylogenetic

significance. Zoomorphology 120, 1 – 13. (doi:10.

1007/s004359900018)

6.

Schwind R. 1980 Geometrical optics of the



Notonecta eye: adaptations to optical environment

and way of life. J. Comp. Physiol. A 140, 59 – 68.

(doi:10.1007/BF00613748)

7.

Horvath G. 1989 Geometric optical optimization of



the corneal lens of Notonecta glauca. J. Theor. Biol.

139, 389 – 404. (doi:10.1016/S0022-5193(89)

80217-6)

8.

Horridge GA. 1968 A note on the number of



retinula cells of Notonecta. Z. Vergl. Physiol. 61,

259 – 262. (doi:10.1007/BF00341119)

9.

Nilsson D, Ro A. 1994 Did neural pooling for night-



vision lead to the evolution of neural superposition

eyes? J. Comp. Physiol. A 175, 289 – 302. (doi:10.

1007/BF00192988)

10. Lythgoe JN. 1972 The adaptation of visual pigments

to the photic environment. In Photochemistry of

vision (ed. HJA Dartnall), pp. 566 – 603. Heidelberg,

Germany: Springer.

11. Land MF, Gibson G, Horwood J, Zeil J. 1999

Fundamental differences in the optical structure of

the eyes of nocturnal and diurnal mosquitoes.

J. Comp. Physiol. A Sens. Neural Behav. Physiol. 185,

91 – 103. (doi:10.1007/s003590050369)

12. Warrant E, Dacke M. 2011 Vision and visual

navigation in nocturnal insects. Annu. Rev.

Entomol. 56, 239 – 254. (doi:10.1146/annurev-

ento-120709-144852)

13. Frederiksen R, Wcislo WT, Warrant EJ. 2008 Visual

reliability and information rate in the retina of a

nocturnal bee. Curr. Biol. 18, 349 – 353. (doi:10.

1016/j.cub.2008.01.057)

14. Frederiksen R, Warrant EJ. 2008 Visual sensitivity in

the crepuscular owl butterfly Caligo memnon and

the diurnal blue morpho Morpho peleides: a clue

to explain the evolution of nocturnal apposition

eyes? J Exp Biol 211, 844 – 851. (doi:10.1242/

jeb.012179)

15. Klaus A, Warrant EJ. 2009 Optimum spatiotemporal

receptive fields for vision in dim light. J. Vis. 9,

11 – 16. (doi:10.1167/9.4.18)

16. Autrum H. 1981 Comparative physiology and

evolution of vision in invertebrates: C: invertebrate

visual centers and behavior II. In Handbook of

sensory physiology, vol. 7 (ed. H Aulrum), p. 674.

Berlin, Germany: Springer.

17. Walcott B. 1975 Anatomical changes during light

adaptation in insect compound eyes. In The

compound eye and vision of insects (ed. GA Horridge),

p. 595. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press.

18. Fain GL, Hardie R, Laughlin SB. 2010

Phototransduction and the evolution of

photoreceptors. Curr. Biol. 20, R114 – R124. (doi:10.

1016/j.cub.2009.12.006)

19. Williams DS. 1982 Ommatidial structure in relation

to turnover of photoreceptor membrane in the

locust. Cell Tissue Res. 225, 595 – 617. (doi:10.1007/

BF00214807)

20. Chamberlain SC, Barlow Jr RB. 1984 Transient

membrane shedding in Limulus photoreceptors:

control mechanisms under natural lighting.

J. Neurosci. 4, 2792 – 2810.

21. Behrens M. 1974 Photomechanical changes in the

ommatidia of the Limulus lateral eye during light

and dark adaptation. J. Comp. Physiol. 89, 45 – 57.

(doi:10.1007/BF00696162)

22. Ioannides AC, Horridge GA. 1975 The organization

of visual fields in the hemipteran acone eye.

Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 190, 373 – 391. (doi:10.1098/

rspb.1975.0101)

23. Ro AI, Nilsson DE. 1994 Circadian and light-

dependent control of the pupil mechanism in

tipulid flies. J. Insect Physiol. 40, 883 – 891. (doi:10.

1016/0022-1910(94)90022-1)

24. Walcott B. 1971 Unit studies on receptor movement

in the retina of Lethocerus (Belostomatidae,

Hemiptera). Z. Vergl. Physiol. 74, 17 – 25. (doi:10.

1007/BF00297786)

25. Ga´bor Horva´th DV. 2004 Polarized light in animal

vision: polarization patterns in nature. Berlin,

Germany: Springer.

26. Krause Y, Krause S, Huang J, Liu CH, Hardie RC,

Weckstrom M. 2008 Light-dependent modulation of

Shab channels via phosphoinositide depletion in

Drosophila photoreceptors. Neuron 59, 596 – 607.

(doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2008.07.009)

27. Hardie RC, Voss D, Pongs O, Laughlin SB.

1991 Novel potassium channels encoded by

the Shaker locus in Drosophila photoreceptors.

Neuron 6, 477 – 486. (doi:10.1016/0896-6273

(91)90255-X)

rspb.r


oy

alsocietypublishing.org

Pr

oc.


R.

Soc.


B

281


:

20141177


8

 on February 9, 2018

http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 



28. Frolov R, Immonen EV, Vahasoyrinki M, Weckstrom

M. 2012 Postembryonic developmental changes in

photoreceptors of the stick insect Carausius morosus

enhance the shift to an adult nocturnal life-style.

J. Neurosci. 32, 16 821 – 16 831. (doi:10.1523/

JNEUROSCI.2612-12.2012)

29. Takalo J, Ignatova I, Weckstrom M, Vahasoyrinki M.

2011 A novel estimator for the rate of information

transfer by continuous signals. PLoS ONE 6, e18792.

(doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0018792)

30. Shannon CE. 1948 Communication in the presence

of noise. Proc. Inst. Radio Eng. 37, 10 – 21.

31. Frolov R, Weckstrom M. 2014 Developmental

changes in biophysical properties of photoreceptors

in the common water strider (Gerris lacustris):

better performance at higher cost. J. Neurophysiol.

112, 913 – 922. (doi:10.1152/jn.00239.2014)

32. Myers JL, Well AD. 2003 Research design and statistical

analysis. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

33. Laughlin SB. 1989 The role of sensory adaptation in

the retina. J. Exp. Biol. 146, 39 – 62.

34. Roebroek JGH, Stavenga DG. 1990 Insect pupil

mechanisms. 4. Spectral characteristics and light

intensity dependence in the blowfly, Calliphora

erythrocephala. J. Comp. Physiol. A Sens. Neural

Behav. Physiol. 166, 537 – 543.

35. Frolov RV, Immonen EV, Weckstrom M. 2014

Performance of blue- and green-sensitive photoreceptors

of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. J. Comp. Physiol. A

Neuroethol. Sens. Neural Behav. Physiol. 200, 209–219.

(doi:10.1007/s00359-013-0879-6)

36. Howard J, Blakeslee B, Laughlin SB. 1987 The

intracellular pupil mechanism and photoreceptor

signal: noise ratios in the fly Lucilia cuprina.

Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 231, 415 – 435. (doi:10.1098/

rspb.1987.0053)

37. Song Z, Postma M, Billings SA, Coca D, Hardie RC,

Juusola M. 2012 Stochastic, adaptive sampling of

information by microvilli in fly photoreceptors. Curr.

Biol. 22, 1371–1380. (doi:10.1016/j.cub.2012.05.047)

38. Bruckmoser P. 1968 Die spektrale empfindlichkeit

einzelner sehzellen des ru¨ckenschwimmers

Notonecta glauca L. (Heteroptera). Z. Vergl. Physiol.

59, 187 – 204.

39. Skorupski P, Chittka L. 2010 Differences in

photoreceptor processing speed for chromatic and

achromatic vision in the bumblebee, Bombus

terrestris. J. Neurosci. 30, 3896 – 3903. (doi:10.1523/

JNEUROSCI.5700-09.2010)

40. Immonen EV, Krause S, Krause Y, Frolov R,

Vahasoyrinki MT, Weckstrom M. 2014 Elementary

and macroscopic light-induced currents and their

Ca

2

þ



-dependence in the photoreceptors of

Periplaneta americana. Front. Physiol. 5, 153.

(doi:10.3389/fphys.2014.00153)

41. Walcott B. 1971 Cell movement on light adaptation

in the retina of Lethocerus (Belostomatidae,

Hemiptera). Z. Vergl. Physiol. 74, 1 – 16. (doi:10.

1007/BF00297785)

42. Nordtug T. 1990 Dynamics and sensitivity of the

pupillary system in the eyes of noctuid moths.

J. Insect Physiol. 36, 893 – 901. (doi:10.1016/0022-

1910(90)90076-R)

rspb.r


oy

alsocietypublishing.org

Pr

oc.


R.

Soc.


B

281


:

20141177


9

 on February 9, 2018

http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 



Document Outline



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling