Developmental Psychology “It Takes a Village” to Support the Vocabulary Development of Children With Multiple Risk Factors


Download 294.27 Kb.

bet3/4
Sana10.01.2019
Hajmi294.27 Kb.
1   2   3   4

Discussion

This study examined the family and community factors that

predicted receptive vocabulary knowledge in 3-year-old children

in Turkey. It is one of the few recent studies on early language

skills to examine a large and nationally representative sample from

a non-Western population. We presented a model predicting vo-

cabulary knowledge of children of families in four risk groups

Table 4


Results of the Most Parsimonious Path Model Predicting Receptive Vocabulary: Unstandardized and Standardized (in

Parentheses) Coefficients

Paths


Low economic status

High economic status

Low depressive

symptoms


High depressive

symptoms


Low depressive

symptoms


High depressive

symptoms


Paths from maternal vocabulary knowledge to . . .

Language stimulation (Path A2)

2.99

ءء

(0.40)



2.99

ءء

(0.38)



1.20

ءء

(0.32)



1.20

ءء

(0.28)



Learning materials (Path A3)

0.86


ءء

(0.20)


0.86

ءء

(0.22)



2.24

ءء

(0.38)



2.24

ءء

(0.42)



Maternal warmth/responsiveness (Path A4)

2.28


ءء

(0.31)


2.28

ءء

(0.28)



1.10

ءء

(0.24)



1.10

ءء

(0.20)



Receptive vocabulary score (Path A1)

0.02


ءء

(0.08)


0.02

ءء

(0.09)



0.02

ءء

(0.13)



0.02

ءء

(0.14)



Paths from perceived support for child care to . . .

Language stimulation (Path B4)

0.06 (0.04)

0.16 (0.11)

0.06 (0.04)

0.06 (0.06)

Learning materials (Path B2)

Ϫ0.03 (Ϫ0.03)

0.15

ءء

(0.21)



Ϫ0.03 (Ϫ0.01) Ϫ0.03 (Ϫ0.02)

Maternal warmth/responsiveness (Path B3)

Ϫ0.05 (Ϫ0.02) Ϫ0.01 (Ϫ0.00) Ϫ0.05 (Ϫ0.03) Ϫ0.05 (Ϫ0.03)

Receptive vocabulary score (Path B1)

Ϫ0.00 (Ϫ0.03)

0.01


ء

(0.22)


Ϫ0.00 (Ϫ0.03) Ϫ0.00 (Ϫ0.04)

Paths from the three measures of family ecology to receptive vocabulary scores

Language stimulation (Path C)

0.01


ءء

(0.28)


0.01

ءء

(0.31)



0.01

ءء

(0.22)



0.01

ءء

(0.26)



Learning materials (Path D)

0.01


ءء

(0.09)


0.01

ءء

(0.09)



0.01

ءء

(0.19)



0.01

ءء

(0.18)



Maternal warmth/responsiveness (Path E)

0.01


ءء

(0.21)


0.00 (0.02)

0.00 (0.01)

0.00 (0.02)

Note.

Path labels are from Figure 1.

ء

p

Ͻ .05.


ءء

p

Ͻ .01.


This

document


is

copyrighted

by

the


American

Psychological

Association

or

one



of

its


allied

publishers.

This

article


is

intended


solely

for


the

personal


use

of

the



individual

user


and

is

not



to

be

disseminated



broadly.

8

BAYDAR ET AL.



defined by the presence of economic and maternal mental health

risks. Maternal vocabulary and support for child care from the

extended family and the neighborhood were the exogenous factors

considered. The characteristics of the proximate family ecology

(i.e., the amount of language stimulation, the availability of learn-

ing materials, and maternal warmth and responsiveness) could

mediate the association of these exogenous factors with children’s

vocabulary development.

Several findings were important because of their contribution to

our understanding of vocabulary development in early childhood

generally. We found that many aspects of our mediational model

did not vary across the four risk groups. The model was identical

regardless of maternal mental health risk among the families of

high economic status. Furthermore, the associations of the char-

acteristics of the family ecology with children’s vocabulary were

identical for all risk groups with only one exception: maternal

warmth and responsiveness was a significant predictor of child

vocabulary only in low economic status families with no maternal

mental health risk. In addition, the direct contribution of maternal

vocabulary on child vocabulary was identical for all families, with

an effect size similar to that found in previous studies (Magnuson,

2007). In sum, our study lends support to the unvarying nature of

the contribution of language skills of the mother, language stim-

ulation by the mother, and the availability of learning materials to

children’s receptive vocabulary.

The mediational paths of association of maternal vocabulary

with child vocabulary were not identical across the four risk

groups. Nevertheless, maternal vocabulary emerged as the most

substantial contributor to child vocabulary, with an estimated total

effect size of slightly under 0.30 for all four groups. Next, we

discuss the components of our model that varied between the four

risk groups.

The aspects of the family ecology that were strongly predicted

by maternal vocabulary in high economic status families differed

from those in low economic status families. In other words, the

mediational associations suggested that high maternal vocabulary

knowledge mobilized learning materials in families of high eco-

nomic status but mobilized language stimulation and maternal

warmth/responsiveness in families of low economic status. How-

ever, either way, it similarly supported a child’s vocabulary de-

velopment. One possible reason for the lack of a link between

maternal vocabulary and some aspects of mother– child interac-

tions in high economic status families may be the high level of

maternal vocabulary skills in those families. It may be that above

a certain threshold, marginal differences in maternal vocabulary do

not predict enhanced mother– child interactions at this develop-

mental stage. Oxford and Spieker (2006) had a similar finding.

Previous findings in Hispanic versus White families in the

United States (Bradley et al., 2001) and a multinational review of

evidence from many developing societies (Walker et al., 2007)

suggest maternal responsiveness as a potential factor of resilience

in developmental delays associated with poverty. On the other

hand, these findings could also point to an increased risk associ-

ated with maternal depression in families of low economic status

because maternal depression could suppress maternal– child inter-

action and maternal warmth and responsiveness, depriving at-risk

children of a powerful resource for verbal development.

Finally, our findings suggest that extrafamilial support for child

care may truly be acting as a protective factor for language

development in families with co-occurring economic and psycho-

logical risk. The differential role of perceived extrafamilial support

emerged even though the amount of perceived support did not vary

by economic status, indicating strong extended family and com-

munity social networks in this sample regardless of economic

status. In the highest risk group, maternal contributions to the

developmental ecology were likely compromised due to elevated

levels of depressive symptoms and economic hardship. In this risk

group, the contribution of support for child care to children’s

vocabulary knowledge was large and positive, and its effect size

matched that of maternal vocabulary (total effect size

ϭ 0.27).

The direct association of extrafamilial support with child vo-

cabulary may arise due to the cumulative effects of child-directed

-0.7


-0.5

-0.3


-0.1

0.1


0.3

0.5


Low depressive 

symptoms


High depressive 

symptoms


Low depressive 

symptoms


High depressive 

symptoms


S

tanda


rd

ized r


ecept

iv



voc

abul


ar

y

 s



cor

  



Low perceived support for child care

High perceived support for child care



Figure 2.

The predicted standardized receptive vocabulary scores of children with high versus low perceived

support for child care in four risk groups of families: results of the most parsimonious path model. (Predicted

means account for the differences in other variables in the path model.)

This

document


is

copyrighted

by

the


American

Psychological

Association

or

one



of

its


allied

publishers.

This

article


is

intended


solely

for


the

personal


use

of

the



individual

user


and

is

not



to

be

disseminated



broadly.

9

ECOLOGY OF VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT



speech and language stimulation. It is possible that the vocabulary

of the child benefits from verbal interactions with all adults who

are engaged with the child. It may be speculated that multiple

caregiver contexts also offer opportunities for observing and learn-

ing vocabulary from overheard conversations (Akhtar, 2005). In a

society where a vast majority of 3-year-olds are cared for in their

homes, noninstitutional support for child care may act as a buffer

against maternal stress and disengagement by generating interac-

tions necessary for word learning.

Our findings have some policy implications. First, maternal

vocabulary emerges as an important resource for vocabulary de-

velopment of all children, underscoring, once more, that maternal

education is a sure way of investing in the language development

of all children, regardless of economic status. When maternal

vocabulary skills are high, mothers create and mobilize a variety of

resources to invest in their children’s vocabulary skills.

Second, the invariability of the processes that predict children’s

vocabulary in families of high economic status suggests that these

families support vocabulary development similarly regardless of

maternal depression. Note that in these families, maternal vocab-

ulary benefited child vocabulary through the availability of learn-

ing materials rather than through supportive maternal– child inter-

actions. The provision of learning materials to the child regardless

of maternal mental health may shield children’s vocabulary devel-

opment from the negative repercussions of maternal depression.

The policy question, then, is whether the provision of learning

materials may also be a viable (and relatively low-cost) way of

supporting the vocabulary development of children of low eco-

nomic status who may or may not have added maternal mental

health risk. Our findings supported this idea because, for families

with both economic and maternal mental health risk, one of the

mechanisms through which extrafamilial support for child care

benefited children’s vocabulary was through the provision of

learning materials.

Third, our findings indicated that in families of low economic

status, maternal warmth and responsiveness were associated with

vocabulary only if the mothers were not depressed. This finding

suggests that parenting training may be a viable intervention for

not only socioemotional but also language development for this

group. The lack of an association of maternal warmth/responsive-

ness with vocabulary development in families of high economic

status may be due to limited variability of this resource in those

families. It is also possible that warmth does not contribute any

further to vocabulary development when other aspects of family

ecology are supportive.

Fourth, our findings pointed to extrafamilial support for child

care as an effective protective factor in families with economic and

mental health risk that operated through direct and indirect routes.

The implication of this finding is that organizing and mobilizing

community networks or supporting naturally occurring support

networks may be effective, at least in some cultural contexts.

The current study revealed the variations in cross-sectional

associations of the characteristics of the family ecology with

vocabulary knowledge in early childhood. As such, it is not able to

support or question causal pathways. Future studies could focus on

longitudinally tracking children’s linguistic knowledge in situa-

tions where multiple risk factors coexist. Further insight into the

trajectories of delay and acceleration in development of this im-

portant domain of cognition, as well as causal mechanisms that

govern it, may be gained by linking these trajectories to changes in

risk status.

In conclusion, this study contributes to our understanding of the

diversity in early childhood ecologies that could support normative

development of a foundational language skill. Although this is not

a cross-cultural study, it presents findings from a nationally rep-

resentative sample from Turkey, and the representative nature of

its sample may allow qualitative comparisons with the established

findings of comparable studies of Anglo-American and Western

European samples. Economic risk in societies such as the context

of the current study implies a deep and pervasive hardship in

multiple domains because public goods and services are scarce and

social welfare programs are inadequate (Fernald et al., 2011). Our

findings that are consistent with the findings from the samples

from developed societies suggest some cross-culturally valid as-

sociations of the characteristics of the family ecology with vocab-

ulary development in early childhood. Our findings that are dis-

crepant with the established literature demonstrate the value of

studying children in diverse developmental contexts and exploring

models that allow for the variability of developmental processes.

This study allowed us to identify naturally occurring community

support as a compensatory developmental resource for children at

high risk.



References

Akhtar, N. (2005). The robustness of learning through overhearing. De-



velopmental Science, 8, 199 –209. doi:10.1111/j.1467-7687.2005

.00406.x


Albright, M. B., & Tamis-LeMonda, C. S. (2002). Maternal depressive

symptoms in relation to dimensions of parenting in low-income mothers.



Applied

Developmental

Science,

6,

24 –34.


doi:10.1207/

S1532480XADS0601_03

Andreassen, C., & Fletcher, P. (2007). Early Childhood Longitudinal

Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS–B): Psychometric report for the 2-year data

collection (NCES 2007– 084). Washington, DC: National Center for

Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of

Education.

Ataca, B., Kag˘ıtçıbas¸ı, C., & Diri, A. (2005). Turkish family and the value

of children: Trends over time. In G. Trommsdorff & B. Nauck (Eds.),

The value of children in cross-cultural perspective: Case studies from

eight societies (pp. 91–119). Lengerich, Germany: Pabst.

Baydar, N., Küntay, A., Goksen, F., Yagmurlu, B., & Cemalcilar, Z.

(2007). Neighborhood Ecologies Survey. Unpublished manuscript.

Baydar, N., Küntay, A., Goksen, F., Yagmurlu, B., & Cemalcilar, Z.

(2010). The study of early childhood developmental ecologies in Turkey

(Grant No. 106K347). Ankara: Scientific and Technological Research

Council of Turkey.

Berument, S. K., & Guven, A. G. (2010). Turkish Expressive and Receptive



Language Test: Receptive Vocabulary Sub-Scale (TIFALDI-RT). An-

kara, Turkey: Turkish Psychological Association.

Bornstein, M. H., Haynes, M. O., & Painter, K. M. (1998). Sources of child

vocabulary competence: A multivariate model. Journal of Child Lan-



guage, 25, 367–393. doi:10.1017/S0305000998003456

Bornstein, M. H., & Tamis-LeMonda, C. S. (1997). Mothers’ responsive-

ness in infancy and their toddlers’ attention span, symbolic play, and

language comprehension: Specific predictive relations. Infant Behavior



& Development, 20, 283–296. doi:10.1016/S0163-6383(97)90001-1

Bradley, R. H., & Caldwell, B. M. (1979). Home Observation for Mea-

surement of the Environment: A revision of the Preschool Scale. Amer-

ican Journal of Mental Deficiency, 84, 235–244.

This


document

is

copyrighted



by

the


American

Psychological

Association

or

one



of

its


allied

publishers.

This

article


is

intended


solely

for


the

personal


use

of

the



individual

user


and

is

not



to

be

disseminated



broadly.

10

BAYDAR ET AL.



Bradley, R. H., & Corwyn, R. F. (2002). Socioeconomic status and child

development. Annual Review of Psychology, 53, 371–399. doi:10.1146/

annurev.psych.53.100901.135233

Bradley, R. H., Corwyn, R. F., Burchinal, P., McAdoo, H. P., & Garcia-

Coll, C. (2001). The home environments of children in the United States

Part II: Relations with behavioral development through age thirteen.



Child Development, 72, 1868 –1886. doi:10.1111/1467-8624.t01-1-

00383


Breznitz, Z., & Sherman, T. (1987). Speech patterning of natural discourse

of well and depressed mothers and their young children. Child Devel-



opment, 58, 395– 400. doi:10.2307/1130516

Bronfenbrenner, U. (1995). Ecological systems theory. In P. Moen, G. H.

Elder, Jr., & K. Lüscher (Eds.), Examining lives in context: Perspectives

on the ecology of human development (pp. 106 –173). Washington, DC:

American Psychological Association.

Cicchetti, D., Rogosch, F. A., Toth, S. L., & Spagnola, M. (1997). Affect,

cognition, and the emergence of self-knowledge in the toddler offspring

of depressed mothers. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 67,

338 –362. doi:10.1006/jecp.1997.2412

Derogatis, L. R. (1992). The Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), administra-

tion, scoring and procedures manual II. Baltimore, MD: Clinical Psy-

chometric Research Institute.

Duncan, G. J., & Brooks-Gunn, J. (1997). Consequences of growing up

poor. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation.

Duncan, G. J., & Brooks-Gunn, J. (2000). Family poverty, welfare reform,

and child development. Child Development, 71, 188 –196. doi:10.1111/

1467-8624.00133

Dunn, L. M., & Dunn, L. M. (1981). Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test—

Revised (PPVT–R). Circle Pines, MN: American Guidance Services.

Farver, J. M., Xu, Y., Lonigan, C. J., & Eppe, S. (2013). The home literacy

environment and Latino Head Start children’s emergent literacy skills.

Developmental Psychology, 49, 775–791. doi:10.1037/a0028766

Fenson, L., Dale, P. S., Reznick, J. S., Bates, E., Thal, D., & Pethick, S.

(1994). Variability in early communicative development. Monographs

of the Society for Research in Child Development, 59(5, Serial No. 242).

Fernald, L. C. H., Weber, A., Galasso, E., & Ratsifandrihamanana, L.

(2011). Socioeconomic gradients and child development in a very low

income population: Evidence from Madagascar. Developmental Science,



14, 832– 847. doi:10.1111/j.1467-7687.2010.01032.x

Grantham-McGregor, S., Cheung, Y. B., Cueto, S., Glewwe, P., Richter,

L., Strupp, B., & the International Child Development Steering Group.

(2007). Child development in developing countries 1: Developmental

potential in the first 5 years for children in developing countries. The

Lancet, 369, 60 –70. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(07)60032-4

Gulgoz, S. (2004). Psychometric properties of the Turkish Vocabulary



Test. Istanbul, Turkey: Koç University.

Hart, B., & Risley, R. T. (1995). Meaningful differences in the everyday



experiences of young American children. Baltimore, MD: Brookes Pub-

lishing.


Hoff, E. (2003). The specificity of environmental influence: SES affects

early vocabulary development via maternal speech. Child Development,



74, 1368 –1378. doi:10.1111/1467-8624.00612

Hoff, E. (2006). How social contexts support and shape language devel-

opment. Developmental Review, 26, 55– 88. doi:10.1016/j.dr.2005.11

.002


Hofstede, G., Hofstede, G. J., & Minkov, M. (2010). Cultures and orga-

nizations: Software of the mind (3rd ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Hurtado, N., Marchman, V. A., & Fernald, A. (2008). Does input influence

uptake? Links between maternal talk, processing speed and vocabulary

size in Spanish-learning children. Developmental Science, 11, F31–F39.

doi:10.1111/j.1467-7687.2008.00768.x

Huttenlocher, J., Haight, W., Bryk, A., Seltzer, M., & Lyons, T. (1991).

Early vocabulary growth: Relation to language input and gender. De-

velopmental Psychology, 27, 236 –248. doi:10.1037/0012-1649.27.2.236

Kag˘ıtçıbas¸ı, Ç. (2007). Family, self, and human development across cul-



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling