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Chemistry

  • What the Hell is it!



What is Chemistry

  • If it moves, it's biology.

  • If it doesn't work, it's physics.

  • If it stinks, it's chemistry.

  • If it’s all three it’s a student



Chemistry

  • Seriously Now!!



Chemistry

  • Persian کیمیا (Kimia)



Chemistry

  • Greek χημεία (Khemeia)

    • Alchemy


History

  • Burning.



History

  • Metallurgy

    • Purifcation
    • Alloys


Alchemy

  • Common Perception

    • Liars
    • Concocting potions


Alchemy

  • Scholars



Alchemy

  • attempted to explore the nature of chemical substances and processes.



History

  • Periodic Table



Chemistry

  • noun (pl. chemistries)

    • 1 the branch of science concerned with the properties and interactions of the substances of which matter is composed.
    • 2 the chemical properties of a substance or body.
    • 3 attraction or interaction between two people.


Chemistry

  • Interactions of atoms and electrons.



Nobel Prize

  • Chemistry Winners



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1901 Jacobus Henricus van 't Hoff

    • Netherlands
    • for his discovery of the laws of chemical dynamics
    • osmotic pressure in solutions


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1902 Hermann Emil Fischer

    • Germany
    • Work on sugar and purine syntheses


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1903 Svante August Arrhenius

    • Sweden
    • Electrolytic theory of dissociation


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1904 Sir William Ramsay



Nobel Prize Winners



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1906 Henri Moissan

    • France
    • Investigation and isolation of the element fluorine, and for the electric furnace named after him


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1907 Eduard Buchner

    • Germany
    • for his biochemical research
    • Discovery of cell-free fermentation


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1908 Ernest Rutherford

    • New Zealand United Kingdom
    • For investigations into the disintegration of the elements,
    • And the chemistry of radioactive substances


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1909 Wilhelm Ostwald

    • Germany
    • Work on catalysis
    • And for his investigations into chemical equilibria and rates of reaction


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1910 Otto Wallach

    • Germany
    • for his work in the field of alicyclic compounds


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1911 Maria Skłodowska-Curie



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1912 Victor Grignard

    • France
    • for his the discovery of the Grignard reagent
  • Paul Sabatier

    • France
    • for his method of hydrogenating organic compounds


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1913 Alfred Werner

    • Switzerland
    • for his work on the linkage of atoms in molecules


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1914 Theodore William Richards

    • United States
    • Determinations of the atomic weight of a large number of elements


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1915 Richard Martin Willstätter

    • Germany
    • for his research on plant pigments


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1916 no award



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1917 no award



Nobel Prize Winners



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1919 no award



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1920 Walther Hermann Nernst

    • Germany
    • for his work in thermochemistry


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1921 Frederick Soddy

    • United Kingdom
    • for his work on the chemistry of radioactive substances
    • Investigations into isotopes


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1922 Francis William Aston

    • United Kingdom
    • For the discovery of isotopes in a large number of non-radioactive elements, and for his whole-number rule


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1923 Fritz Pregl

    • Austria
    • for his invention of the method of micro-analysis of organic substances


Nobel Prize Winners



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1926 Theodor Svedberg

    • Sweden
    • for his work on disperse systems


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1927 Heinrich Otto Wieland

    • Germany
    • for his investigations of the bile acids and related substances


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1928 Adolf Otto Reinhold Windaus

    • Germany
    • for his research into sterols and their connection with vitamins


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1929 Arthur Harden Hans Karl August and Simon von Euler-Chelpin

    • United Kingdom Sweden
    • for their investigations on the fermentation of sugar and fermentative enzymes


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1930 Hans Fischer

    • Germany
    • for his research into haemin and chlorophyll


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1931 Carl Bosch and Friedrich Bergius

    • Germany and France
    • for their synthesis of new radioactive elements


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1936 Petrus (Peter) Josephus Wilhelmus Debye

    • Netherlands
    • for his work on molecular structure through investigations on dipole moments and the diffraction of X-rays and electrons in gases


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1937 Walter Norman Haworth

    • United Kingdom
    • for his work on carbohydrates and vitamin C"Paul KarrerSwitzerland"for his work on carotenoids, flavins and vitamins A and B2


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1938 Richard Kuhn

    • Germany
    • for his work on carotenoids and vitamins


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1939 Adolf Friedrich Johann Butenandt

    • Germany
    • for his work on sex hormones
  • and Leopold Ružička

    • Switzerland
    • for his work on polymethylenes and higher terpenes


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1940 no award



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1941 no award



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1942 no award



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1943 George de Hevesy

    • Hungary
    • for his work on the use of isotopes as tracers to study chemical processes


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1944 Otto Hahn

    • Germany
    • for his discovery of the fission of heavy nuclei


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1945 Artturi Ilmari Virtanen

    • Finland
    • for his research and inventions in agricultural and nutrition chemistry, especially for his fodder preservation method


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1946 James Batcheller Sumner

    • United States
    • for his discovery that enzymes can be crystallized
  • John Howard Northrop

  • Wendell Meredith Stanley

    • United States
    • for their preparation of enzymes and virus proteins in a pure form


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1947 Sir Robert Robinson

    • United Kingdom
    • for his investigations on plant products, especially the alkaloids


Nobel Prize Winners



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1949 William Francis Giauque

    • United States
    • for his contributions in the field of chemical thermodynamics


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1950 Otto Paul Hermann Diels and Kurt Alder

    • West Germany
    • for their discovery and development of the diene synthesis. Diels-Alder reaction.


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1951 Edwin Mattison McMillan and Glenn Theodore Seaborg

    • United States
    • the discovery in the chemistry of transuranium elements


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1952 Archer John Porter Martin and Richard Laurence Millington Synge

    • United Kingdom
    • for their invention of partition chromatography


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1953 Hermann Staudinger

    • West Germany
    • for his discoveries in the field of macromolecular chemistry


Nobel Prize Winners



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1955 Vincent du Vigneaud

    • United States
    • for his work on sulphur compounds, especially the first synthesis of a polypeptide hormone


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1956 Sir Cyril Norman Hinshelwood and Никола́й Никола́евич Семёнов

    • United Kingdom and Soviet Union
    • for their research into the mechanism of chemical reactions


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1957 Sir Alexander Todd

    • United Kingdom
    • for his work on nucleotides and nucleotide co-enzymes


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1958 Frederick Sanger

    • United Kingdom
    • for his work on the structure of proteins, especially insulin


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1959 Jaroslav Heyrovský

    • Czechoslovakia
    • for his discovery and development of the polarographic methods of analysis


Nobel Prize Winners



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1961 Melvin Calvin

    • United States
    • for his research on carbon dioxide assimilation in plants


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1962 Max Ferdinand Perutz and John Cowdery Kendrew

    • United Kingdom
    • for their studies of the structures of globular proteins


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1963 Karl Ziegler and Giulio NattaWest

    • Germany and Italy
    • for their discoveries relating to high polymers


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1964 Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin

    • United Kingdom
    • for her determinations by X-ray techniques of the structures of important biochemical substances


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1965 Robert Burns Woodward

    • United States
    • for his achievements in organic synthesis


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1966 Robert Sanderson Mulliken



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1967 Manfred Eigen and Ronald G. W. Norrish and George Porter

    • United Kingdom and West Germany
    • for their studies of extremely fast chemical reactions, effected by disturbing the equilibrium by means of very short pulses of energy


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1968 Lars Onsager

    • Norway United States
    • for the discovery of the reciprocal relations bearing his name


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1969 Derek H. R. Barton and Odd Hassel

    • United Kingdom and Norway
    • for their contributions to the development of the concept of conformation


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1970 Luis F. Leloir

    • Argentina
    • for his discovery of sugar nucleotides and their role in the biosynthesis of carbohydrates


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1971 Gerhard Herzberg



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1972 Christian B. Anfinsen

    • United States
    • for his work on ribonuclease, especially concerning the connection between the amino acid sequence and the biologically active conformation
  • Stanford Moore and William H. Stein

    • United States
    • for their contribution to the understanding of the connection between chemical structure and catalytic activity of the active centre of the ribonuclease molecule


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1973 Ernst Otto Fischer and Geoffrey Wilkinson

    • West Germany United Kingdom
    • for their pioneering work, performed independently, on the chemistry of the organometallic, so called sandwich compounds


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1974 Paul J. Flory

    • United States
    • for his fundamental work, both theoretical and experimental, in the physical chemistry of macromolecules


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1975 John Warcup Cornforth

    • Australia United Kingdom
    • for his work on the stereochemistry of enzyme-catalyzed reactions
  • Vladimir Prelog

    • Switzerland
    • for his research into the stereochemistry of organic molecules and reactions


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1976 William Nunn Lipscomb, Jr.

  • United States

  • for his studies on the structure of boranes illuminating problems of chemical bonding



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1977 Ilya Prigogine

    • Belgium
    • for his contributions to non-equilibrium thermodynamics, particularly the theory of dissipative structures


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1978 Peter D. Mitchell

    • United Kingdom
    • for his contribution to the understanding of biological energy transfer through the formulation of the chemiosmotic theory


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1979 Herbert C. Brown and Georg Wittig

    • United States and West Germany
    • for their development of the use of boron- and phosphorus-containing compounds, respectively, into reagents in organic synthesis


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1980 Paul Berg

    • United States
    • for his fundamental studies of the biochemistry of nucleic acids, with particular regard to recombinant-DNA
  • Walter Gilbert and Frederick Sanger

    • United States andUnited Kingdom
    • for their contributions concerning the determination of base sequences in nucleic acids


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1981 福井謙一 and Roald Hoffmann

    • Japan and United States
    • for their theories concerning the course of chemical reactions


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1982 Aaron Klug

    • South Africa United Kingdom
    • for his development of crystallographic electron microscopy and his structural elucidation of biologically important nucleic acid-protein complexes


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1983 Henry Taube

    • United States
    • for his work on the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions


Nobel Prize Winners



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1985 Herbert A. Hauptman and Jerome Karle

    • United States
    • for their achievements in developing direct methods for the determination of crystal structures


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1986 Dudley R. Herschbach and 李遠哲 and John C. Polanyi

    • United States, Taiwan - United States and Canada
    • for their contributions concerning the dynamics of chemical elementary processes


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1987 Donald J. Cram, Jean-Marie Lehn and Charles J. Pedersen

    • United States and France
    • for their development and use of molecules with structure-specific interactions of high selectivity


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1988 Johann Deisenhofer, Robert Huber and Hartmut Michel

    • West Germany
    • for their determination of the three-dimensional structure of a photosynthetic reaction centre


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1989 Sidney Altman and Thomas R. Cech

    • Canada United States and United States
    • for their discovery of catalytic properties of RNA


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1990 Elias James Corey

    • United States
    • for his development of the theory and methodology of organic synthesis


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1991 Richard R. Ernst

    • Switzerland
    • for his contributions to the development of high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1992 Rudolph A. Marcus

    • United States
    • for his contributions to the theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1993 Kary B. Mullis

    • United States
    • for his invention of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method
  • Michael Smith

    • Canada
    • for his fundamental contributions to the establishment of oligonucleotide-based, site-directed mutagenesis and its development for protein studies


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1994 George A. Olah

    • Hungary United States
    • for his contribution to carbocation chemistry


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1995 Paul J. Crutzen, Mario J. Molina, F. Sherwood Rowland

    • Netherlands, Mexico and United States
    • for their work in atmospheric chemistry, in particular ozone depletion


Nobel Prize Winners



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1997 Paul D. Boyer and John E. Walker

    • United States and United Kingdom
    • for their elucidation of the enzymatic mechanism underlying the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate
  • Jens C. Skou

    • Denmark
    • for his discovery of an ion-transporting enzyme, Na+/K+-ATPase


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1998 Walter Kohn

    • United States
    • for his development of the density functional theory
  • John A. Pople

    • United Kingdom
    • for his development of computational methods in quantum chemistry


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 1999 أحمد زويل

    • Egypt United States
    • for his studies of the transition states of chemical reactions using femtosecond spectroscopy


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 2000 Alan J. Heeger, Alan G MacDiarmid, 白川英樹

    • United States, New Zealand, Japan
    • for their discovery and development of conductive polymers


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 2001 William S. Knowles and 野依良治

    • United States, Japan
    • for their work on chirally catalysed hydrogenation reactions
  • K. Barry Sharpless

    • United States
    • for his work on chirally catalysed oxidation reactions" see Sharpless asymmetric dihydroxylation


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 2002 John B. Fenn and 田中耕一

    • United States and Japan
    • for their development of soft desorption ionisation methods for mass spectrometric analyses of biological macromolecules
  • Kurt Wüthrich

    • Switzerland
    • for his development of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for determining the three-dimensional structure of biological macromolecules in solution


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 2003 Peter Agre

    • United States
    • for the discovery of water channels
  • Roderick MacKinnon

    • United States
    • for structural and mechanistic studies of ion channels


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 2004 Aaron Ciechanover, Avram Hershko and Irwin Rose

    • Israel and United States
    • for the discovery of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 2005 Robert Grubbs, Richard Schrock and Yves Chauvin



Nobel Prize Winners

  • 2006 Roger D. Kornberg

    • United States
    • for his studies of the molecular basis of eukaryotic transcription


Nobel Prize Winners

  • 2007 Gerhard Ertl

    • Germany
    • for his studies of chemical processes on solid surfaces"


Subdisceplines

  • The Area’s of specific Interest



Subdisciplines

  • Analytical Chemistry



Subdisciplines

  • Biochemistry



Subdisciplines

  • Inorganic Chemistry



Subdisciplines

  • Organic Chemistry



Subdisciplines

  • Physical Chemistry



Subdisciplines

  • Theoretical Chemistry



Subdisciplines

  • Atmospheric Chemistry



Employment Opportunities

  • What can we get paid to do!!



Employment Opportunities!

  • Research



Employment Opportunities!

  • Analytical



Employment Opportunities!

  • Education



Employment Opportunities!

  • Industry



Employment Opportunities!

  • Pretty much anything!

    • Police
    • Quality Control
    • Technician
    • Water management


The Future!

  • Materials



The Future!

  • Power

    • Batteries


The Future!

  • Solvents



The Future!

  • Theatre

    • Smoke fluids
    • Flame simulation
    • Fluorescent Compounds for safety.


What makes you a chemist

  • Well…



You Might Be a Chemist if:

  • You carry your lab safety goggles around with you at all times, just in case...



You Might Be a Chemist if:

  • You start disagreeing with scientific points in films and correct them at every possible moment



You Might be a Chemist if:



You Might be a Chemist if:

  • you start referring to the smell of nail polish remover as an acetone smell.



You Might be a Chemist if:

  • you don't drink water, you drink H2O.



You Might be a Chemist if:

  • you become very agitated when people refer to air as Oxygen, and proceed to list all of the components of air



You Might be a Chemist if:

  • you think a mole is a unit of amount, rather than a small furry animal in your lawn



Thank You For Listening

  • – Bibliography –

    • www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemistry
    • New Scientist Issues from 2004 – 8th Feb 2007
    • Analytical Chemistry – Higson
    • Physical Chemistry – Atikins & dePaula
    • Inorganic Chemistry – Shriver & Atkins
    • Organic Chemistry – Claydon, Greaves, Warren and Wothers
    • http://www.workjoke.com/projoke25.htm



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