Editorial board slava stetsko


Download 16.82 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet1/44
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi16.82 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   44
75002

A  quarterly journal devoted  to  the study of Ukraine
Spring, 1993
Vol. XL, No. 1

EDITORIAL BOARD
SLAVA  STETSKO 
Senior Editor
STEPHEN OLESKIW 
Executive Editor
VERA  RICH 
Research Editor
NICHOLAS  L.  FR.-CHIROVSKY,  LEV  SHANKOVSKY, 
Ol-EH  S.  ROMANYSHYN
Editorial Consultants
Price: £5.00 or $10.00 a single copy 
Annual Subscription; £20.00 or $40.00
Published by
The Association  of Ukrainians, in  Great Britain,  Ltd, 
Organization  for the Defense  of Four Freedoms 
for Ukraine, 
Inc. 
(USA)
Ucrainica 
Research Institute  (Canada)
ISSN 0041-6029
Editorial Inquiries;
The  Executive  Editor,  “The  Ukrainian  Review' 
200  Liverpool  Road,  London,  N1  1LE
Su b scrip tion s:
“The  Ukrainian  Review”  (Administration),
49  Linden  Gardens,  London,  W2  4.HG
Printed in Great Britain by the Ukrainian Publishers Limited 
200 Liverpool Road, London, N1  ILF 
Tel: 071 607 6266/7
  • 
Fax-  071 607 6737

The Ukrainian Review
Vol. XL, No. 1 
A Quarterly Journal 
Spring 1993
C O N T E N T S
EDITORIAL  2
Current Affairs
THE  BANKRUPTCY  OF  LEGISLATIVE  POWER  Viktor  Fedorchuk 
3
UKRAINE’S  CUSTOMS  SERVICE:  CONTROLLING  THE  “TRANSPARENT
 
BORDERS”  Olena  Zvarych 
5
CAN  KUCHMA  PULL  UKRAINE  OUT OF THE  CRISIS?  Viktor  Marchenko 

PRIVATISATION —  YET ANOTHER  DECEPTION  Roman  Radyletskyi 
10 
PATRIOTIC  PESSIMISTS  Ihor  Dlaboha 
13
History
AN  ENGLISHMAN  IN  UKRAINE,  1918 
17
PROBLEMS OF THE HISTORY OF THE OUN AND  UPA  Wolodymyr Kosyk  2 4
 
THE MATRON WHO  WOULD  NOT BE A MAID  Ralph  G.Bennett M.D. 
33
Literature
TO  OSNOVYANENKO  Taras  Shevchenko 
36 
SPRING  SONGS  Ivan  Franko 
39
News  From Ukraine  44
Documents  &  Reports  82
Books  91

2
THE UKRAINi 
i  !  r !>  V
EDITOI
With  this  iv>ue.  "The  Ukrainian  Review"  enters  its  fortieth  calender  !c  :r
 
publication.  Forty  years,  of course,  is  a  figure  » it:i  evocative  overtone.',  le i  g
 
according  to  the  book  ol  i'.xodus.  the  period  wETh  the  Israelite:-  were  o b ip ’i'  .o
 
spend  in  the 
desert. 
so  tli..i  no  one  who  had  v-er  been  a  .-.line  in  Egyp-  s-  o  Id
 
enter  the  Promised  land,  Indeid,  it  is  with 
the 
'-. ords 
Sore:; :u
 

limy  ; ears  —
 
that  Ivan  Fianko  ..pens  his  I'.rs  at  narrative  j> a-;  !  'Moses ',  la  whkh  he  us-.-s  he
 
Exodus  story  to  symbolise  and  elucidate  the  long  struggle  of  Ukraine  for
 
independence.  It  is a  pleasing  coincidence,  therefore,  that in  the  opening issue  of
 
this  fortieth  year;  we  record  an  event  which,  to  readers  in  the  United  Kingdom,
 
must  have  fully  brought home  Ukraine’s  changed  status  in  the  world  —   the  visit
 
to  Britain  of President Leonid  Kravchuk  of Ukraine.
Informed  observers of the  East  European scene  had,  of course,  taken  on  board
 
U kraine’s  steps  tow ards  independence  culminating  in  the  independence
 
referendum  of 1  December  1991,  which dealt  the 
coup-de~grace
 to  the  moribund
 
Soviet  Union.  But  For  those  not  familiar  with  that  scene,  the  collapse  of  the
 
world’s  largest  state  into  fifteen  independent  republics  —   with  the  strong
 
possibility  that  at  least  one  of  them  would  disintegrate  further,  was  too  much  to
 
grasp.  There  were  no  historical  precedents:  the  dismemberment  of  the  Austro-
 
Hungarian  and  Ottoman  empires  following  World  War  I  was  accomplished  by
 
international  treaty;  the colonies  of the  British  Empire  moved  towards 
svaraj
 and
 
whwnr  in  an  orderly  queue.  But  here,  the  political  order  of  one  sixth  of  the
 
world's  land  surface  fell  apart  overnight.  Even  to  the  most  dedicated  opponents
 
o f the  ills of Soviet  power the  shock  was enormous.
1992
,  therefore,  was  a  year  in which  the  international  community  had  to  come  to
 
terms with a new and still highly confused,  map of Eastern Europe, when businessmen
 
wishing  to establish  relations  with  the  new,  independent republics,  were  bereft of the
 
normal  structures  of  trade  attaches  to  brief  them  and  consulates  to  issue  them  visas.
 
Foreign  ministries  throughout  the world hastily rescheduled their  budgets to fund new
 
embassies  —   and  Set  their  staff  to  learning  hitherto-obscure  languages;  university
 
departments  revamped  their  courses  and  restructured  their  “Soviet  studies"
 
departments,  and  cartographers,  philatelists,  and  vexillologists  revelled  in  a  surfeit  of
 
new maps,  stamps,  and flags.  As the  months  passed, the  confusion gradually grew less.
 
Ukraine  now  has  an  Embeissÿ  in  London,  and  the  United  Kingdom  an  Embassy  in
 
Kiev.  In  1992.  the  Royal  Institute  of  International  Affairs  had  four  major  meetings  on
 
Ukraine-relatèd  topics,  while  London  University'  now  has  not  only  a  regular  seminar
 
series on  Ukrainian  affairs  at its  School  of Slavonic and East European Studies, but also
 
has held several conferences on security  issues (sponsored by  King’s College) in which
 
Ukrainian  issues were prominently featured.
With this  new emphasis on Ukraine and Ukrainian affairs as matters of general,  rather
 
than  specialised,  importance,  the  Editors of 
Thé 
Ukrainian Review  feel  that this journal
 
has a major role to play in making Ukrainian history,  literature and culture known to the
 
new, wider public who, for the first time perhaps,  find Ukraine and  things Ukrainian on
 
their  personal  or  business  agendas.  We  hope,  over  the  next  few  issues,  to  tailor  our
 
contents  to  the  needs  of this  new audience,  while,  we  hope,  still continuing to  interest
 
and satisfy our loyal  readers of the  past four decades.  We should therefore  like to invite
 
all readers,  old and new,  to let us  know what they would like  to see in our pages,  and
 
how,  in  their  opinion,  this  journal  can  best,  in  the  world  situation  of  1992,  serve  the
 
better mutual understanding of Ukraine and the Anglophone world. 


Current Affairs
TH E BANKRUPTCY OF LEGISLATIVE POWER
Viktor Fedorchuk
By  taking  the  u n p reced en ted   step ,  on  N ovem ber  18,  o f  tem porarily
 
e n tru stin g   legislativ e  p o w e r  to  g o v e rn m e n t  m in isters,  the  U krainian
 
parliament  has  created  a  new   socio-political  situation  in  the  country.  With
 
the  concentration  o f legislative  and executive  pow er  in  its  hands,  the  Cabinet
 
of Ministers,  formerly  accountable  to  the  president  and  the  Supreme  Council;
 
has  for  the  time being replaced these  two government institutions.
Executive power is being reinforced with the intention of achieving an efficient
 
implementation  o f  market  reforms  and  their  legal  reinforcement  by  a  single
 
government  institution.  This  step  is,  however,  unconstitutional.  Article  9 7   of the
 
Constitution  of Ukraine  directly  rules  out  similar  experiments:  “The  single  organ
 
of legislative  power of Ukraine  is  the  Supreme  Council  of Ukraine”.  According to
 
this  constitutional  principle,  the  country’s  executive  power  cannot  perform  a
 
legislative function.
The  Supreme  Council  has  the  right  to  review  and  adopt  decisions  on  all
 
matters,  with  the  exception  of  restricting  its  own  legislative  powers,  ceding
 
them  to  the  executive  or  judicial  branches  of  government.  Such  a  step  is  a
 
symptom  o f political  bankruptcy,  political  impotence,  and  a  renouncement of
 
power.  If  nothing  more,  then  it  is  at  least  a  sign  of  disrespect  towards  the
 
electorate.
The  present  Supreme  Council  of  Ukraine  still  has  a  long  w ay  to  g o   to
 
achieve  the  professionalism  of Western  parliaments.  To  some  o f the  deputies,
 
for  instance,  the  Supreme  Council  is  n o  m ore  than  a  secon d   job,  their
 
primary  concern  being  the  local  posts  of  importance  they  occupy  in  their
 
own  constituencies:  directors  o f collective  and  state  farms,  factory  directors,
 
bank  managers  and  heads  o f  commercial  enterprises.  These  deputies  are
 
thus  completely  unprepared  for  carrying  out  a  legislative  function.  They  d o
 
not  participate  in  the  formulation  o f legislation  and  leave  their constituencies
 
merely  to  pose  in  front  o f  television  cam eras  in  parliament.  On  the  o ne
 
hand,  they  want  to  create  the  impression  o f serious  political  activity,  and,  on
 
the  oth er,  n o t  to  lo se   o u t  o n   th e  p ay   an d   b en efits  o f  th eir  p rim ary
 
em ploym ent.  Such  a  parliam ent  is  incapable  o f  implem enting  eco n o m ic
 
reform  and  backing  it  u p   with  appropriate  legislation,  and  o f  resolving  the
 
problems  of building  an  independent state.

The  first  and  forem ost  course  of  action  in  today’s  com plicated  s o cio ­
econom ic  situation  in  Ukraine  is  to  develop  legislative  power,  transforming  it
 
into  a  professional  permanent  body,  and  not  to  reinforce  executive  power  at
 
th e  e x p e n s e   o f  the  legislatu re.  Do  the  p resen t  Suprem e  C ouncil  and
 
government  actually  want  to  implement  econom ic  and  political  reforms?  All
 
their measures so  far have  fell  short  of implementing actual  reforms.  ’The  Fokin
 
governm ent  drew  up  four  econom ic  programmes,  which  w ere  ratified  by
 
parliament  but  never  implemented.  The  Supreme  Council  passed  a  series  of
 
laws,  including  one  on  the  nationalisation  and  privatisation  of state  enterprises
 
and  the  housing  fund,  but  no  progress  has  been  made.  So  far  no  one  has
 
begun  to  tackle  land  reform  or has  any intention  of doing so.
Political  pow er  and  econom ic  structures  are  in  the  hands  of  communist
 
partocrats  and  the  mafia.  Hiding  behind  Ukrainian  national  colours,  they  are
 
trying  to  give  the  impression  o f  building  an  independent  Ukraine.  These
 
people  cannot be  expected  to  build  an  independent  Ukrainian  state.  To  them
 
the  very  idea  is  incomprehensible  and  foreign.  The  individual  thus  has  no
 
protection  against  the  highhandedness  of the  communist 
nomenklatura,
  and,
 
as  in  the  past,  the  people  remain the  servants  of the 
nomenklatura.
Th e  co m m u n ist 
n o m en k la tu ra ,
  w h ich   is  thriving  on  th e   p o litica l
 
impotence  of  the  state  and  the  econom ic  chaos,  and  which  is  plundering
 
Ukraine  and  preventing  it  from  rising  out  o f  colonial  servitude,  has  an
 
interest  in  the  deterioration  of  the  socio-econom ic  situation  in  Ukraine.  The
 
CPSU,  today  numerically  the  strongest  and  best  organised  party,  which  is
 
slowly  legalising  itself  through  various  parties  of  the  socialist  orientation,  is
 
also  in te re s te d   in  th e  d e te rio ra tio n   o f  the  situ ation   in  U k rain e.  Th e
 
communists  are  doing  everything  they  can  to  destroy  the  Ukrainian  econom y
 
and  drive  the  people  to  com plete  impoverishment.  They  w ant  to  use  the
 
general  m ood  of despondency  to provoke  a  social  explosion.  Their goal  is  to
 
induce  the  people  to  quash  their  own  independence  and  drive  Ukraine  into
 
a  new  Union.  They  are  acting  with  impunity  because  political  pow er  is  in
 
their  hands.
Without removing  the  communist 
nom enklatura
 from  power,  the  building
 
of  an  independent  Ukrainian  state  is  impossible  There  is  only  one  feasible
 
solution:  extraordinary  elections,  which  will  deliver  a  blow  to  the  communist
 
nom enklatura
 and boost  the  political  and econom ic processes  in  Ukraine. 
8
4________________________________________  
TH E UKRAINIAN  REVIEW

CURRENT AFFAIRS 
5
UKRAINE’S CUSTOMS SERVICES... ■' 
CONTROLLING  THE “TRANSPARENT BORDERS”  :
Qi&naZvarych
After the  USSR  broke  up  into separate  national  states,  Ukraine  becam e  like
 
a  homestead  ravaged  by  storm:  no  fences,  only  an  ardently  guarded  gate.
 
This  tragicom ic  situation  has  quite  aptly  b eco m e  known  as  “transparent
 
borders”.  Ukraine  is  facing  a  similar situation  on  more  than  three-quarters  o f
 
its  state  borders,  until  recently  administrative  boundaries  with  Russia; 
Belarus; 
and  Moldova.
In  the  spring  of  1992,  during  the  conflict  in  Trans-Dnistria,  Ukraine  replaced
 
its  militia  posts  on  the  border  with  Moldova  with  twenty-two  custesms  posts,
 
assigning  a  sizable  contingent  of border  troops  for  their  protection.  Considering
 
the  relative  stability  in  Russia  and  Belarus,  Ukraine was  iri  no hurry to  establish
 
customs  control  on  its  border  with  these  two  countries.  President  Kravchuk’s
 
directive  of  October  12,  1992,  was  somewhat  belated  in  Comparison  with  a
 
similar decree  by Boris  Yeltsin,  as  a  result o f which  customs  posts on the  border
 
with  Russia  and  Belarus  will  be  operational  only  from  January  1,  1993.  Until
 
then,  this  section o f the  border will  be guarded by  the militia.
In  view  of  its  geographical  position,  Ukraine  should  have  taken  this  step
 
m uch  sooner.  The  transit  routes  o f  n early  o ne  hundred  states  cross  its
 
territory.  Ukraine  spent  vast  sums  of  money  in  establishing  a  new   customs
 
service.  It  was  late  in  imposing  customs  duty  (including  tolls)  and,  up  to
 
November  1992,  charged  duty  according  to  old  Soviet  tariffs.  Ukraine  spent
 
half a  million 
karbovcmtsi
 to  fill  the  gap  on  the  Moldovan  border,  which  went
 
to  set  up  the  customs  posts.  These  inadequate  sums  ensure  that  this  border
 
remains  “transparent”  and  that  the  customs  posts  are  incapable  o f  checking
 
the  flow o f industrial and  consumer contraband,  money,  and even  arms.
According  to  General  Bodnar  of  the  border  troop«,  the  demarcation  line
 
b etw een   Ukraine  and  M oldova,  as  w e ll  as  Russia  and  B elaru s  will  be
 
established  only  in  the second  half o f 1993.  For every  customs  post  along  the
 
Moldovan  border  there  are  around  thirty  roads  which  go  around  it,  which
 
the  sm ugglers  readily  use.  Smugglers  pay  drivers  arou n d   five  thousand
 
karbovantsi
 for  every  car  that  drives  their  merchandise  past  a  customs  post
 
u n d etected ,  and  around  ten  thousand  for  ev ery   bus.  T here  is  thus  no
 
shortage  of local  volunteers  for  the  job.  The  present  customs  posts  therefore
 
amount  to  no  more  than  a  statement  of sovereignty.
With  no  demarcation  line,  this  “transparent”  border  is  the  most convenient  for
 
the  movement  o f  non-ferrous  metals,  which  are  being  smuggled  to  the  Vtfest.
 
Moreover,  many  petty  businessmen  use  this  border  to  transport  consum er

s
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
technology,  commodities,  and  so  on.  Jewels  and  narcotics  generally  leave
 
Ukraine  through  its western  borders.  They are smuggled  in diplomatic bags  after
 
bribing  customs  officers,  or other  means.  In  the  summer of  1992,  large  quantities
 
of  arms  were  frequently  moved  between  Moldova,  Trans 
Dnistria
  and  Ukraine.
 
Following the  official  withdrawal  of the  Russian  Cossacks  from  the  Trans- Dnister
 
region,  however,  the  flow of arms was  markedly  reduced.
Ukrainian  armoured  vehicles  no  longer  deter  the  villagers,  who  use  their
 
free  days  to  visit  markets  across  the  border.  In  the  evening  hours  shots  can
 
still  be  heard  from  Trans-Dnistria,  despite  the  presence  there  of  Russia’s
 
peacekeeping  force.  People  living  in  the  border  area  therefore  have  no
 
illusions  about  peace  along  the  Trans-Dnistrian  border.  The  Trans-Dnistrians
 
are  still  prepared  to  fight  for  their independence  in  spite  of the  cost.
F or  the  tim e  b ein g,  h ow ever,  an tagonism   on  the  b o rd er  co n ce rn s
 
Moldova’s  unsuccessful  attempts  to  impose  its  customs  service  on  Trans-
 
Dnistria,  which  has  established  its  own  militia  posts.  The  reaction  of  the
 
Trans-Dnistrians  is  unanimous:  why  should  another  country  establish  its
 
customs  posts  in  their region?
Ukraine  can  be  glad  of  one  thing.  Its  control  points  on  this  section  of the
 
border  are  superior  to Moldovan  and  Trans-Dnistrian  customs  posts.  Ukraine
 
has  a  separate  border  and  customs  control,  and  new  customs  declarations
 
are  being  produced.  However,  the  control  posts  are  practically  without w ater
 
and  heat.  They  lack  all  facilities  and  are  manned  by  officials  unfamiliar  with
 
custom s  regulations.  U nem ployed  volunteers  from  the  local  population,
 
primarily  former  soldiers,  settle  for  these  close  to  extrem e  conditions  for  a
 
pay  of around  four to  five  thousand 
karbovantsi
These  volunteers  are  compelled to  take  on  this  difficult  and thankless job not
 
only because  of unemployment,  but  also by  a  craving for an  easy income in the
 
form of bribes and confiscated goods.  For the  time  being,  however,  the customs
 
officers  are  without  hot  meals  or  any  confidence  in  the  day  to  come.  They
 
freeze  along  the  roads,  surrounded  by  wind-swept  fields,  going  inside  their
 
booths  from  time  to  time to warm their hands  beside  an  old-fashioned heater.
Today  the  m ajority  o f  cu stom s  posts  still  lack  telep h o n e  or  radio
 
communications.  Five  or  six  customs  posts  arc  scattered  along  an  area  hundreds
 
of kilometres  across  without any good roads.  They have  no  cross-country vehicles
 
only one small  car between  all  of them,  unsuitable for existing driving conditions.
In contrast  to their  Polish,  Hungarian  and Czech  colleagues,  Ukrainian  customs
 
officers  do  not  carry  arms,  even  those  who  serve  on  the  dangerous  Moldovan
 
border.  One  night  at  the  end  of October,  for  instance,  unknown  persons  shot up
 
a  customs  post at Krasnooknynsk. Three days after the  incident,  persons  driving a
 
stolen  car  to  Moldova  fired several  bursts of automatic  fire  at  the  Maiaky customs
 
post,  in  the Odessa  oblast,  killing four customs officers.
The  situation  on  the  Moldovan-Ukrainian  border  cannot  be  attributed  to
 
Ukraine’s  poverty  or  remaining  traces  of  Soviet  negligence  alone.  Certain
 
business  circles  in  Ukraine have  a  particular  interest in “transparent borders”.  ■

CURRENT AFFAIRS 
7
CAN 
KUCHMA PULL UKRAINE  :

 : 
O U T 
OF 
THE 
C R IS IS ? '
Viktor Marchenko
At  the  end  o f  last  year  and  the  beginning  o f  this  year  the  Cabinet  o f
 
Ministers  issued  a  series  of decrees,  which  constituted  the  government’s  first
 
p ra ctica l  ste p s  to w a rd s  o v e rco m in g   the  p re s e n t  crisis.  T h e   c h a n g e s
 
introduced  by  these  decrees  affect  various  aspects  o f  social  life  but  contain
 
very  few  surprises,  b n ly  the  measures  sanctioning  the  unrestricted  circulation
 
o f  hard  cu rrency  con tradicted   the  plans  o f  d eputy  prim e  minister  Thor
 
Yukhnovskyi.  Yukhnovskyi  maintained  that  the  exchange  rate  between  the
 
coupon  (Ukrainian 
rouble:  karbovanets)
  and  the  dollar  is  being  deliberately
 
inflated  and  should  be  fixed  by  the  state.  In  practice,  these  measures  have
 
endorsed  a  virtually  unrestricted  circulation  of  hard  currency  in  Ukraine  at  a
 
fluctuating  exchange  rate.
The  remainder  o f the  laws  are  fully  consistent  with  previous  declarations
 
by  members  o f  the  government.  Taxes  on  business  have undergone  a  partial
 
reduction.  Value  added  tax,  for  instance,  has  been  reduced  from  2 8   to  20  per
 
cent,  and  taxes  on  profit  have  replaced  taxes  on   turnover.  The  lucrative
 
income  of  state  and  private  companies  is  being  restricted.  The  government
 
has  declared  its  intention  to  put  an  end  to  bureaucratic  corruption  and  the
 
misappropriation  o f state  property.  State  firms  have  been  barred  from  setting
 
up  private  companies.  Several  high-ranking  government  officials  have  been
 
dismissed,  som e  of  them  arrested  on  charges  o f  corruption.  However,  it  is
 
the  people  who  will  have  to  pay  for  the  implementation  o f  new   reforms  in
 
Ukraine.
Wage  indexing  has  been  abolished  and  there  is  a  restriction  on  w age
 
increases  at  state  firms,  which  em ploy  the  majority  of  the  labour  force.
 
Simultaneously,  the  government delivered  a   powerful  blow  to  private  trade.
 
The  duty  imposed  on  privately exported  consumer goods  will  inevitably  lead
 
to  a  marked  increase  in  prices  on  the  commodities  markets,  where  prices  are
 
relatively  lower  and  most  people  buy  their consum er goods.
The  inspiration  behind  the  reforms,  Economics  Minister  Viktor  Pynzenyk,
 
is  o p tim is tic  a b o u t  o v e rc o m in g   th e  e c o n o m ic   cris is  an d   a c h ie v in g
 
stabilisation  this  year.  He  plans  to  reduce  the  rate  of inflation  to  2-3  per  cent
 
per  annum  from  the  present  3000  per  cent.  H ow ever,  the  governm ent’s
 
capacity  to  implement  its  own  programme  is  extrem ely  doubtful.  The  tax
 
reductions  are  riot  sufficient  en ou gh   to  m ake  Ukraine  a  businessm an’s
 
p a ra d ise .  A  re d u ctio n   in  ta x e s  d o e s  n o t  a u to m a tica lly   c r e a te   b e tte r


THE-:  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
conditions.  Taxes  are  still  high  enough  to  impede  econom ic  development  in
 
Ukraine.  This  primarily  con cern s  value  added  tax,  w hich  is,  in  practical
 
terms,  a  sales  tax  that  enable?  the  same  goods  to  be  taxed  several  times.
 
M oreover,  p rofit  will  be  ta x e d   tw ice:  as  the  firm ’s  p rofit  an d   as  the
 
p ro p rietor’s  profit.  Thus  an  influx  o f  capital  into  Ukraine  is  not  to  be
 
expected.  Naturally,  changes  in  tax  policy  will  create  better  conditions  for
 
econom ic  development.  They  will  not,  however,  ensure  sufficient  growth  to
 
avert  the  further  collapse  of  the  econom y  and  the  growing  impoverishment
 
of the  population.
The  second  weak  point  in  Kuchma’s  policy  is  his  determination  to  lay  the
 
en tire  b u rd en   o f  the  transition  p eriod   on  the  p eo p le.  U krainians  are
 
distinguished  for  their  exceptional  patience,  but  there  is  a  limit  to  this  patience.
 
Last  year  there  was  a  sharp  decrease  in  living  standards,  which  are  rapidly
 
becoming  too  low  to satisfy even  elementary  physiological  needs.  Those  earning
 
an  average  income  can  no  longer  feed  or  clothe  themselves  on  their  wages,  let
 
alone  support their family or  manage  their household.
A  legal  restriction  on  lucrative  income  can  initially  win  popular  support  as
 
hopes  for  a  drop  in  prices  begin  to  rise.  But  the  initial  euphoria  will  soon
 
p ass  as  m ark et  p rice s  a re   d eterm in ed   not  by  net  p rice s ,  but  b y  the
 
interrelation  between  supply  and  demand.  The  disproportion  resulting  from
 
such  artificial  restrictions  will  play  into  the  hands  of  the  mafia  speculators,
 
which  is  already  thé  case  with  railway  tickets.  Speculators  are  buying  up
 
train  tickets  in bulk,  reselling  them  at 3 - 4 times  their  nominal  price.  This  new
 
development will  only  strengthen  the  position  of the  powerful  local  mafias.
The  Cabinet  o f  Ministers  can  make  whatever  plans  it  likes.  The  point  is,
 
however,  Whether  the  people  will  go  on  tolerating  the  government’s  whims.
 
The  people  feel  cheated.  All  promises  concerning  social  rights  and  interests
 
have  b een   broken.  The  w ave  o f  public  rallies  follow ing  the  lis t  price
 
increases  demonstrated  the  level  o f  social  tension  in  the  country,  which  is
 
leading  to  a  new  mass,  uncontrolled  explosion  of indignation,  which  will  put
 
an   e n d   to   all  re fo rm s.  T h e  situ a tio n   can   only  b e  a lle v ia te d   b y   an
 
improvement  in  the  material  position  of  the  people,  but  there  are  p  esenü 
i 
n o  serious  grounds  for  such  hopes  in  the  near  future.
It  is  also  difficult  to  ascribe  any  success  to   the  governm ent’s  plan  to
 
establish  order  in  the  state  econom ic  sector.  All  hopes  of setting  up  efficient
 
state  firms  ap p ear  naive.  This  w as  even  beyond  the  cap acity  of  Stalin,
 
compared  to  whom today’s  government leaders  look like  apprentices.  Another
 
factor,  which  predetermines  the  failure  of  these  plans  is  the  close  ties  of
 
Ukraine’s  econom y  to  the  Commonwealth  of  Independent  States,  primarily
 
Russia.  Stabilisation 
& la
  Kuchma  is  thus  impossible  without  contacts  with
 
Russian  leaders,  who are neither inclined nor able to help Ukraine.
The  reduction  in  centralised  planning  in  government  businesses  does  not
 
bring  them  greater  freedom.  The new  government  measures  do  not  offer  any
 
incentives.  In  practice  this  will  mean  that  state  businesses,  which  Kaye  no

CURRENT AFFAIRS 
9
interest  in  their  own  productivity,  will  make  no  attempt  to  win  the  market  and
 
supply  it  with  their  own  goods.  This  has  happened  on  numerous  occasions.
 
The  liberalisation  of  prices  on  industrial  goods  and  food  left  shops  empty.
 
H ow ever,  instead   o f  creatin g   an  interest  In  p rodu ctivity,  th e   Kuchm a
 
government has  resorted to  tough measures  to achieve positive  results.
Ukraine’s  econom y  remains  greatly  dependent  on  Russia.  For  instance,
 
although  fuel  prices  in  Kyiv  have  already  reached  international  standards,
 
making  the  im port  o f  oil  from  countries  o th er  than  Russia  a  lucrative
 
prospect,  there  are  no  private  firms  capable  of undertaking  anything  on  this
 
scale.  The  state,  on  the  Other  hand,  does  not  seem   interested  in  making  a
 
profit.  The  latest government decrees do  nothing  to  improve  this  situation.
The  Cabinet  o f  Ministers  has  failed  to  take  realistic  and  decisive  steps
 
towards  alleviating  and  simplifying  Ukraine’s  painful  transition  to  the market.
 
The  government  has  missed  the  opportunity  to  carry  out  privatisation  more
 
effectively,  to  reduce  the  bureaucratic 
apparat,
  which  is  impairing  private
 
initiative  and  is  the  so u rce   o f  co rru p tio n ,  an d   to  cre a te   an   efficien t
 
mechanism  to  protect  citizens’  rights  and  property.  Such  measures,  Which  do
 
not  require  a  large  capital  investment,  can  have  an  immense  econom ic  effect
 
in  a  relatively  short  period  of time.
Is  the  Polish  scenario  feasible  in  Ukraine?  The  question  remains  open.
 
However,  Ukraine  has  already  lost  the  opportunity  for  a  slow,  evolutionary
 
transformation  of the economy and society, the  leitmotif of government speeches.
 
From  Poland’s  shock  therapy  Ukraine  borrowed  only  shock,  and  from  the
 
evolutionary  model  —   the  absence  Of  swift  results.  Only  one  course  remains
 
open  for  Ukraine:  to  force  through  reforms  as  quickly  as  possible  in  order  to
 
achieve  positive  results.  But  the  new  prime  minister,  in  whatever  ways  he  may
 
differ  from  Vitold  Fokin,  is  implementing  a  programme  that  would  have  been
 
effective  last  year  and  is  repeating  the  fundamental  mistakes  of his  predecessor:
 
the  slow  pace  of  reform,  hopeless  attempts  to  resolve  new  problems  by  old
 
methods,  and  reservations  concerning  decisive  steps  towards  the  market.  Thus
 
hie  government’s  capacity  to  successftilly  implement  constructive  policies  in  the
 
present situation  remains doubtful. 
-  HR'

10 
; ; 
j-  :: 
^   V.  ^
PRIVATISATION —  Y E T ANOTHER DECEPTION
Roman Radyletskyi
The  Cabinet  of  Ministers  has  finally  turned  to  privatisation.  Privatisation
 
vouchers worth  thirty thousand 
karbovantsi (karbovanets:
  Ukrainian  rouble)  will
 
be  distributed  free  to  the  entire  population.  This,  however,  is  a  purely  symbolic
 
gesture  as  the  vouchers  can  only  b e  used  for  buying  shares  in  privatised  state
 
firms and cannot be sold or exchanged between  private individuals.
In  February  arid  March  of  last  year,  the  Ukrainian  parliament  passed  a
 
series  o f laws,  one  on  the  Privatisation  of Small  Enterprises  and  one  on  the
 
Privatisation  o f  Large  Enterprises,  and  a  Law   on   Privatisation  Vouchers.
 
Together  with  the  Law  o n   Foreign  Investment,  this  legislation  established
 
the  m echanism o f  privatisation.
Despite  these  m easures,  no  progress  was  m ade  with  privatisation  last
 
year.  Like  virtually  all  econom ic  reforms  in  Ukraine,  the  plans  to  transform
 
ineffective state  businesses  into  effective  private  enterprises  met with  failure.
 
However,  the  principal  flaw  o f  the  privatisation  programme  lies  not  in  the
 
failure  to  meet  deadlines,  but  in the  inherent flaws  in  its  mechanism.
Th e  privatised  state  firms  are  to  be  sold  at  open  auctions  and  every
 
citizen  will  receive  special  vouchers  to  buy  shares  in  privatised  businesses.
 
Certain  firms,  primarily  the  larger  enterprises,  however,  will  be  privatised
 
not  through  sale  at  open  auction,  but  on  a  so-called  competitive  basis,  that
 
is  through  direct deals'.'
Privatisation,  which  will  be  carried  out  in  two  stages,  will  take  a  minimum
 
of  four  years  to  com p lete.  Initially,  small  businesses  —-  sh op s,  various
 
services  and  a  number  o f small  industrial  firms —   are  to  be  privatised,  to be
 
followed by  the large  and  medium-sized  enterprises in  1994-1995.
The  free  hand-over  o f  part  of  state  property  to  the  public  is  intended  to
 
demonstrate  the  state’s  concern  for  its  people,  to  create  an  equal  opportunity
 
for  every  citizen,  and  to  symbolise  the  social  justice  of the  new  Ukraine.  The
 
principles  of social  justice  and  concern  for  the  welfare  of  the  general  public,
 
however,  are  pure  fiction.  As bids  for state enterprises  can  also  be m ade using
 
cash,  this  will  cause  the  value  of  the  vouchers  to  drop.  Inflation  has  already
 
reduced  the  real  value  of  the  vouchers  by  at  least  150  per  cent.  Although
 
inflation  will  continue  to  rise,  the  vouchers  will  no  longer  b e  indexed.  Thus,
 
when  privatisation  is  actually  introduced,  the  ordinary  citizen’s  shares  in  state
 
property  will  be  worth  next  to  nothing.  In  the  eyes  of  som e  politicians  this
 
may  constitute  social  justice.  In  practice,  however,  it  is  those  with  money  —
 
the  mafia,  the 
nouveaux  riches
  w ho  made  their  fortune  through  speculation

and  the  large-scale  misappropriation  of state  property,  who  will  benefit  from
 
privatisation.
It  is,  however,  procedural  matters  that  will  deliver  the 
coup  d e gra ce  to 
the  g en eral  public.  T h e  a v e ra g e   citizen  ca n n o t  k e e p   track   o f  all  the
 
countless  privatisation  auctions,  or  assess  the  condition  and  real  value  of
 
businesses  or  their  prospects.  The  average  citizen  will  thus  have  to  turn  to
 
third  parties  to  organise  and  manage  his  investment,  who  will,  naturally,
 
charge  a  commission  for  their  services.  The  fixed  assets  of small  businesses
 
are  relatively  low,  which  will  increase  competition  on  the  market  between
 
the  vouchers  and  cash,  devaluing  the  vouchers  even  farther.  At  the  second
 
stage,  the  remaining  vouchers  will  have  to  com pete  with  an  even  greater
 
abundance  of cash, which  will  eventually  reduce  them  to  an  abstract  symbol
 
of  the  well-meaning  intentions  o f  parliament.  In  Ukraine  the  vouchers  will
 
be  worth  much  less  than  in  Russia  and,  in  view  of  the  m eagre  benefits,  a
 
significant  section  of the  population  will  simply  not  find  it  worth  their while
 
to  go  through  all  the bureaucratic red  tape  unnecessarily.
The  private  citizen  will  thus  receive  hardly  anything.  But  the  state  will
 
gain  nothing  either.  H uge  profit  losses  will  ensure  another  few  years  o f
 
inefficient  production  by  the  state  sector.  The  potential  losses  incurred  by
 
the  people  will  be  markedly  higher  than  the  value  of  the  vouchers  they
 
receive  from  the  state.  The  privatisation  o f  services  and  shops  will  not
 
improve  the  overall  econom ic  situation  and  welfare  o f the  people since  they
 
do  n o t  c re a te   su fficien t  m aterial  re so u rce s.  State  b u sin esses,  w h o se
 
employees  have  always  shown  little  concern  for  communal  property  and
 
w hose  fixed  assets  have  dropped- by  an  average  o f  50 -8 0   per  cent,  will
 
con tin u e  to  u se  their  o u td ated ,  u n eco n om ical  m achinery.  As  a  result,
 
completely  drained  small  firms  with  antiquated  equipment  will  be  privatised
 
during  the  first  stage  o f  the  plan.  If we  add  the  huge  expenses  required  to
 
maintain  the  bureaucratic  apparatus  which  runs  the  State  Property  Fund,
 
responsible  for  establishing  the  guidelines  for  privatisation  and  for  the  sale
 
of  state  property,  and  the  various  local  privatisation  commissions,  then  the
 
complete  ineptness  of the  privatisation  plan  becom es clear.
The  old 
nomenklatura,
  those  who  drew  up  the  plans  for privatisation,  will
 
benefit.  They  have  already  acquired  the  best  positions  in  the  State  Property
 
Fund  and  on  the  local  privatisation  commissions:  Prospective buyers will  have
 
to  pay  huge  bribès  for  confidential  information  and  fo r  the  privilege  of
 
acquiring  a  business.  The  other  beneficiaries  will  b e  the  various  third  parties,
 
which  will  claim  their own  lion’s share of commissions from  clients.
An  intelligent  approach  to  privatisation  could  give  a  powerful  boost  to
 
economic  development in  Ukraine  and  solve  the  social  and  economic  problems.
If the  most  energetic  and  ambitious  citizens  are  offered  a  genuine  opportunity  to
 
increase their wealth  and  raise  their social  status by  free shares  in state firms, they
 
will  eventually  become  an  important  factor  in  the  economic  development  of the
 
country.  Moreover,  this would greatly reduce soda! tension.
CURRENT AFFAIRS 


11

12 
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
Th e  sale  of  o th er  state  enterprises  for  cash   w ou ld   co v e r  th e  sta te ’s
 
enormous budget  deficit without  increasing  the  tax  burden  on businesses  and
 
the  general  public.  The  rate  o f  privatisation  is  no  less  important:  the  sooner
 
factories  acquire  new  owners,  the  sooner  they  will  begin  to  operate  normally
 
a s  each  day  of delays entails huge losses.
Economics Minister Viktor Pynzenyk  recently stated  that  one  of the  stumbling
 
blocks  of privatisation  is the  lack of sufficient capital  to buy shares  in businesses.
 
The  Cabinet  of  Ministers  is  thus  clearly  demonstrating  its  failure  to  grasp  the
 
essence  of  market  reforms.  Privatisation  should  not be  carried  out  purely  for  the
 
sake  of  turning  people  into  capitalists,  but  in  order  to  change  the  producer's
 
attitude  towards  production  and  thereby  to  use  the  powerful  lever  of  personal
 
interest and  initiative  in building the country’s economy. Those with  capacity and
 
energy  will  turn  to  business,  while  those  without  will  simply  sell  their  shares.
 
This  will  not  affect  the  interests  of die  wealthy.  It  makes  no  difference  to  them
 
from whom they buy up shares,  from the state,  or from  small proprietors.
However,  the  utilisation  of  the  powerful  econom ic  potential  o f  the  state
 
to  accelerate  econom ic  development  remains  purely  theoretical.  In  the  short
 
period  o f  ind ep en d en ce  m any  opportunities  have  b een   lost  and  many
 
illusions  have  been  shattered.  The  free  hand-over  of state  enterprises  to  the
 
general  public  is  merely  another  myth. 

Documents 1934-1944
WolodymyeKosyk
in  this  175-page  collection  Wolodymyr  Kosyk  subjects  the  Third  Reich’s 
attitude  towards  the  Ukrainian  question  to  a  painstaking  analysis  by 
compiling and  commenting  on  the  crucial  documents covering  a decade 
(1934-1944) which encom passes both  peace and war.
This  period  of  Germ an-Ukrainian  relations  has  heretofore  been  largely 
overlooked  by  Ukrainian  and  other  scholars.  Thus,  Kosyk’s  attempt  is  a 
pioneering  one.  He  draws  the  materials  for  his  work  from  such  sources 
as:  the  German  Federal  Archives (civil  and  military),  the German  Foreign 
Ministry,  a id  the  International Military Tribunal in  Nuremberg.
Ukrainian Central  Information Service,  London 
Price:  £8.00  ($15.00  U S )
ISBN  0-902322-39-7
;  f’leaseaend your order to:::.
UCIS,  200  Liverpool  Road,  London  N1  I L F

CURRENT AFFAlTRS 
13
PATRIOTIC  PESSIMISTS
(Results of a public  survey in Ukraine, November 1992)
IhorDlaboha
It  is  safe  to  say  that  ev eryo n e  is  in terested   in  the  d ev elo p m en t  o f
 
dem ocracy  in  Ukraine  and  the  nation’s  reaction  to  that  process.  After  350
 
years  of  Russian  subjugation  and  more  than  7 0   years  of Communist  Russian
 
domination,  the  question  that  is  on  the  minds  of many  people  is  what  do  the
 
man  and  woman  on  the  street  today  actually  think  about  their  new-found
 
fre e d o m   an d   in d e p e n d e n c e ,  th e  D e c e m b e r  1,  1 9 9 1 ,  re fe re n d u m ,
 
notwithstanding.
A  recent  poll  of  Ukrainians  has  shown  that  despite  the  current  econom ic
 
and  political  uncertainties,  and  a  pessimistic  outlook  on  future  personal  well­
b ein g,  m ost  resp o n d en ts  in  U kraine  o ffer  a  positive,  th ou gh   critical,
 
assessment  of  the  events  of  the  past  year  and  only  an  insignificant  minority
 
longs  for  a  return  to  the  socialist  days.  In  general,  the  survey  reveals  that
 
Ukrainians  support  the  democratic  and  econom ic  reforms  in  their  country,
 
however,  many  favour  a  quicker  pace  in  their  development.  Furthermore,
 
patriotism  and  religion,  or belief in  God,  have also increased in  Ukraine.
The  results  of the  Times Mirror Centre  for the People  and the  Press  survey,
 
co n d u cted   in  Ukraine  in  N ovem ber  1992,  have  been  recently  reported,
 
though  the  article’s  spin  focused  disproportionately  on  one  misinterpreted
 
negative,  albeit  dramatic, 
response
  —   that  52  p er  cent  o f  the  people  said
 
they  disagree  with  events  in  Ukraine  in  the  past  12  months  ■
—   without
 
adding an  analysis  of other questions  and  their  responses.
“As  their  standard  of living  goes  from  bad  to  worse  and  uncertainty  about
 
the  future  increases,  the  Russian  people  have  soured  on  dem ocracy",  the
 
Centre  wrote.  “D em ocracy  also  eroded  in  Ukraine  and  Lithuania,  but  not
 
nearly  so  severely  as  in  Russia”.
The  Ukrainian  su rvey,  co n d u cte d   u n d er  th e  d irectio n   o f  Dr.  Elena
 
Bashkirova,  managing  director  of  Romir  Ltd.  o f Moscow,  is  based  on  1,400
 
personal  interviews  held  on  N ovem ber  1-15,  1992,  with  a  representative
 
sample  of persons  over  the  age  of  15.  The  Centre  said the  Ukrainian  poll was
 
carried  out  in  l
60
‘ primary  sampling  units  that  were  drawn  from  a  sampling
 
frame  that  was  stratified  by  region  and  city  size.  The  current  survey  was  a
 
follow-up  to  one  conducted  in  May  1991.
In  response  to  the  question:  “Overall,  do  you  strongly  approve,  approve,
 
disapprove  or strongly  disapprove  of the  political  and econom ic  changes  that
 
have  taken  place  in  our country over  the  past  few  years”,  52  per cent  did,  in
 
fact,  respond  that  they  do  not.  Thirty-three  per  cent  said  they  approved,
 
while  15  per  cent didn’t  know.
The  survey,  which  was  simultaneously  conducted  in  Russia  and  Lithuania,
 
showed  that  in  Russia  the  sam e  number  disapproved,  while  31  per  cent  and

14
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
17  per  cent,  respectively,  approved  or  didn’t  know.  Meanwhile,  in  Lithuania,
64  per  cent  approved,  27  disapproved and 9  didn’t know.
On  the  surface,  the  responses  in  Ukraine  could  lead  a  reader  to  interpret
 
the  num bers  as  indicating  lire  population  does  not  favour  the  country’s
 
situation.  However,  answers  to  questions  about  the  kind  of  political  order
 
they  would  like  to  see  in  Ukraine  or  the  pace  of  political  and  econom ic
 
reforms  demonstrate  that  Ukrainians  support  the  changes,  though  they  feel
 
they  are  proceeding  too  slowly.
For  example,  as  for  which  political  order  should  develop  in  Ukraine, 
8
  per
 
cent  favoured the  old socialist  system,  down  2  per  cent  from  May  1991;  20  per
 
cent favoured democratic socialism,  down 7  per cent from  the  previous  poll;  15
 
per  cent  sided  with  a  modified  form  of Scandinavian  capitalism,  down  11  per
 
cent;  19  per  cent  favoured  Western  capitalism,  down  4  per  cent,  and  38  per
 
cent offered  no opinion  on the  matter,  an  increase of 24  per  cent in  18  months.
At  worst,  this  question  reveals  that  the  people  are  confused  about  which
 
political-economic  order  they  favour,  and  at  best,  only  a  few  people  want  a
 
return  to  command socialism.
As  for  the  pace  of democratic  reforms,  45  per  cent  of  Ukrainians  feel  it  is
 
progressing too  slowly, 
6
  per cent say  it  is  too  fast  and  14  per  cent  think  it  is
 
about right.  The  latter two  figures  show  insignificant  changes  from May  1991,
 
while  the  “too  quickly”  group  dropped  9  percentage  points.  In  contrast,  31
 
per  cent  of  Russians  felt  is  was  proceeding  too  slowly,  down  from  4 0   per
 
cent  in  the  previous  poll.
In  its  analysis  of  the  results,  the  Centre  wrote:  “Ukraine  lags  Russia  in
 
econom ic  reform,  however,  and  greater  disaffection  with  both  dem ocracy
 
and  free  markets  may  appear  in  the  future  if the  speedier  movement  toward
 
free  markets,  as  promised by  the  new  prime  minister,  Leonid Kuchma,  brings
 
greater hardship”.
The  responses  to  the  question  about  free-market  reforms  reveal  a  jump  to
 
4 8   per  cent  among  those  who  say  it  is  too  slow  and  a  decrease  to 
12
  per
 
cent  in the  too-quickly  category.
Responses  to  queries  about  patriotism  am ong  Ukrainians  also  offered
 
positive  information.  The  data  showed  that  in  the  past  18  months  it  has
 
remained  well  above  50  per  cent,  though  the  two  categories  —   completely
 
and  mostly  agree  —   show  striking  differences.  In  May  1991,  22  per  cent  o f
 
Ukrainians  said  they  com pletely  agreed   with  the  statem en t  “I  am   very
 
p a trio tic”.  A  y e a r  an d   a  h alf  later,  the  figure  jum ped  to   41  p e r  cen t.
 
Conversely,  reacting  to  the  same  statement  then,  40  per  cent  replied then they
 
mostly  agreed,  while  today  27  per  cent  mostly  agreed.  As  for  the  cumulative
 
results  for  the  disagree  category,  previously  27  per  cent  sided  with  those
 
choices  and  in  November  1992,  only  18  per cent chose  those  characteristics.
In  analysing  patriotism  or  nationalism  in  Ukraine,  the  Centre  wrote:  “som e
 
rise  in  patriotic  sentiment  occurred,  especially  in  western  and  central  Ukraine,
 
where  nationalists  are  determined  to  create  greater  ‘national  consciousness’  by
 
em phasizing  their  new-found  distinctiveness  from  Russians  and  recalling
 
historic injustices allegedly done  them b y ‘the Moscow colonizers’”.
Also,  the  Centre  found,  “East-west  differences  tin  Ukraine]  go  beyond  the
 
socialist  sentiment  and  language  preference.  The  heavily-Russianized  eastern

CURRENT AFFAIRS 
I S
portion  is
  much  more  pro-authoritarian  than  the  w est,  45  p ercent  to  I I
 
percent,  and  much  less  inclined  to  dem ocracy  0 8   percent  to 
60
  percent);
 
Easterners  were  also  less  approving  of the  political  and econom ic  changes  of
 
recent  years,  more  disillusioned with  the  Ukrainian  parliament,  less  religious,
 
less  patriotic,  and  less  inclined  to  say  parts  o f neighboring  territories  belong
 
to  Ukraine.  Not surprisingly,  99  percent of easterners  have  favorable views  of
 
Russians,  compared  with  84  percent  of those  in western  Ukraine”.
Some  of the  questions  in  the survey also  asked  respondents  to  judge  other
 
nationalities,  territorial  claims  and  military  intervention.
Though  a  question  about Ukrainians’  favouring  Russians  or  not  in  Ukraine
 
was  not  posed,  Russians,  when  asked  whether  they  favoured  Ukrainians  in
 
Russia,  responded  positively  by  82  per  cent.  In  contrast,  Jew s  garnered  only
 
6 5 -per  cent  favourable  responses.  While  this  answer  may  not  actually  reveal
 
what  Russians  really  feel  towards  Ukrainians,  a  question  about  the  use  of
 
Russian  troops  to  defend  Russians in  neighbouring  countries elicited  a 
46
  per
 
cent  positive  response,  with  the  greatest  number  o f  those  in  favour  coming
 
from  persons  under  25,  with  a  higher  education  and  income  living  in  the
 
M oscow 
oblast.
  This  question  was  also  not  asked  In  Ukraine.  The  Centre  did
 
find  that  the  unfavourability  rating  o f Jew s  in  Ukraine  dropped  from  22  per
 
cent  to 
13
  per  cent..
Ukrainians  w ere  included  in  a  question  about  “parts  o f  neighboring
 
countries  that  really  belong  to  us”.  Twenty-eight  per  cent  agreed  with  the
 
statement,  while  43  per  cent  did  not.  The  responses  did  not  reflect  any
 
radical  d ifferen ce  b etw een   the  tw o  polls.  Also,  a  grow ing  n u m b er  o f
 
Ukrainians  responded  that  they  have  less  in  common  with  other  nationalities
 
and  races  in  their  country.
Russians,  on  the  o th e r  hand,  rep lied   by  3 7   p er  ce n t  that  p arts  o f
 
neighbouring  countries  are  Russian,  up  15  per  cent  from  May  1991,  with  27
 
per  cent  in  disagreement  today,  down 
21
  per cent.
The  responses  to  these  questions  reveal  that  among  Russians  there  may  be
 
latent  feelings  of  superiority,  chauvinism,  even  aggression  tow ards  non-
 
Russian  countries.
While  50  per  cent  of  Ukrainians  favour  a  democratic  form  o f government
 
(down  7  per  cent)  and  29  per  cent  support  a  strong  leader,  Leonid  Kravchuk
 
continues  to  hold  the  favour  of 
60
  per  cen t  o f  the  p eop le.  In  judging
 
Kravchuk,  24  per  cent  view  him  mostly  unfavourably,  and  9   per  cent  very
 
unfavourably.  When  asked’ about  Boris  Yeltsin,  38 per  cent  of Ukrainians  said
 
they  favoured him, 15  points  fewer  than  in  May  1991.
Leonid  Kuchm a.has  the  favour  of  29  per  cent  of  die  population,  with  9
 
per  cent  falling  in  the  negative  category  and  43  per  cent  saying  they  don’t
 
know.  Vyacheslav  Chornovil,  transliterated  in  the  tabulations  as  “Vladislav
 
Tchernovil”,  has  the  support  of 29  per  cent  and  the  disfavour  of 53  per  cent.
 
Suprem e
  Council  Chairman  Ivan  Plyushch’s  tallies  are  41  per  cent  v.  28  per
 
cent,  and  Rukh’s,  27  per  cent v.  52  per cent.
The  Supreme  Council  of Ukraine  also showed signs  of falling  into disfavour.
 
When  asked  if  the  parliament  has  a  good  influence  on  the  way  events  are
 
proceeding  in  the  country,  23  per  cent  said  yes,  compared  with  45  per  cent
 
earlier.  The  unfavourable  rating egged up from 24  per cent to 29 per ce n t

Thirty-two  per  cent  of  Ukrainians  believe  there  Is  more  dem ocracy  today
 
than  in  the  past  (Only  22  p e r cent  in  Russia),  while  37  per  cent  say  there  is
 
less,  and 
31
  per cent  offered; no  opinion.
W hen  asked  where  on“'die  ladder  of  life  the  respondents  find  themselves
 
today,  compared with  five years  ago and  five years  from now,  Ukrainians said
 
average  to  low  in  all  cases,  though  differences  between  the  two  ap p eared
 
Less than  10  per cent  felt they  are, were  or will be  on  the  higher rungs.
As  for  today,  28  per  cent  replied  average  and 7 0   per  cent low;  46  per cent
 
replied  average  five  years  ago  and  44  per  cent  low,  and  31  per  cent  average
 
five  years  from  now   and  54  per cent low.
Admitting  that  the  country  is  suffering  a  malaise,  Ukrainians  placed  most
 
of  the  blam e  for  it  on  the  Communists  and  today's  leaders,  though  the
 
current  government edged out the  Communists 6 7   per  cent to  49  per  cent.
Private  property  is  supported  in  Ukraine  by  an   overwhelming  majority  o f
 
Ukrainians  —  
68
  per  cent  to  23  per  cent.  H ow ever,  they  also  feel  that
 
capitalism  will  not  make  them  rich.  Sixty-four  per  cent  said  that  hard  work
 
offers  little  guarantee  of success* 
51
  per  cent  believe  people  get  ahead  at  the
 
expense  of others  (29  per  cent  say  it is based  on  ability  and  ambition).
As  for  radio  and  television,  51  per  Cent  believe  they  have  a  good  influence
 
on  the  country’s events,  up 
10
  per cent from the  last poll,  but 31  per cent  agree
 
w ith  placing  greater  constraints  and  controls  on  what  newspapers  print  and
 
television  and  radio  broadcast.  In  the  last  survey,  70  per  cent  disapproved  of
 
controls,  while  today  51  per  cent  disapprove.  W hen  asked  about  political
 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   44


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling