Editorial board slava stetsko


Download 16.82 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet11/44
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi16.82 Mb.
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   ...   44
Parties
Competition  for  the  right  to  govern  and  for  political  power  must  take  place 
among serious  political  parties.  A  political  party is  a unique  modern  institution. 
It  is  not  as  association,  a  club,  a  brotherhood,  a  congregation,  a  confession,  a 
faction,  a  lobby,  a special  interest group or a single-issue pressure group.
A   national  political  party  has  to  have  an  outward  outlook  and  reach, 
members  in  every  constituency,  a  national  programme  or  platform,  and  an 
open  membership.  The  newly  independent states  must  have  more  than  one 
serious  and  coherent  political  party  and  far  less  than  the  embarrassing  and 
self-defeating number o f 20  or 30.
Political  parties  must  for  the  most  part  be  informed  by  the  political  and 
ideological  legacy  o f  the  West  and  the  real  remaining  differences  between 
left and right,  liberal  and conservative.
The  Communist  party,  which  in  fact  was  a  fanatical  ersatz religious  sect, 
must  remain  outlawed  on  the  principle  o f  “the  separation  between  church 
and state”.
The  Rule  of  Law
A   state  is  a  constitutional  and  an  architectonic  order  in  which  there  is  a 
rule  o f law  and  a  constitution  based  on  viable  laws,  a  constitution  o f  order 
and liberty.
You  build  a  state  from  the  bottom  up  like  a  house,  or  rather  you  bring  it 
up  like  a  child.  This  must  be  based  on  a  proper  conception  o f the  nature  o f 
the  human being  as  a  creature  o f God with  God-given  rights which  the  state 
is  established to  protect.  This  is  contrary to statism  and  totalitarianism.
8 Michael  Oakeshott, 
On Human Conduct,
  Oxford,  Clarendon  Press,  1975.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
15
Statism  and  totalitarianism  are  based  upon  the  principle  that  “everything 
is  forbidden unless  permitted by government”.  A   civilised  democratic state  is 
based  on  the  opposite  principle  o f “everything  is  permitted  unless  expressly 
forbidden by  law”.  This  is similar to  the Ten  Commandments,  most o f which 
are  formulated  in  the  negative:  Thou  shalt  not....  And what  is  not  expressly 
forbidden is  permitted.
Professor  Hayek  has  distinguished  states  that  are  based  on  nomos or  telos; 
procedure  or  cause.  The  state  should  essentially  be  like  a  night  watchman. 
When the people  are up and about and working the state should sleep.  When 
the  people are sleeping the state should be watching for foreign enemies.
C apitalism
An economy is  an aspect o f the state.  Economic conduct is  a  part o f and an 
aspect  o f  human  conduct  in  general.  As  I  said  earlier,  an  economy  is  struc­
tured  and  shaped by  the  political  order and  the  constitution.  There  are  essen­
tially  only two  types  o f political  orders  and  therefore  two  types  o f economies. 
There  are  planned  or  command  economies  and  free  or  liberal  economies.  In 
other  words,  there  are  either  variants  o f  mercantilist,  feudalist,  socialist  or 
communist economies,  or free enterprise so-called capitalist economies.
Capitalism,  o f course,  is  a Marxist misnomer for  free  enterprise  and unhin­
dered  entrepreneurship.  Karl  Marx  confused  the  early  monopolistic  capital­
ism  o f  19th-century  industrial  Britain  with  the  exclusive  reign  o f  capital. 
Hence,  the  name  capitalism  for a  free-enterprise,  liberal,  democratic  political 
and  economic  order.  The  question  since  has  been,  is  there  “a  third  w ay” 
between  capitalism  and  communism?  This  quest  has  driven  Catholic  social 
thought  from  "Rerum  Novarum”  to  “Centessimus  Annus”  in  May  1991,  when 
Pope John  Paul  II  moved  away  from  a  redistributionist  approach  based  on 
liberation  theology  and  renewed  the  church's  emphasis  on  free  enterprise, 
the  production o f wealth,  work and fair proflt.9
Francis  Bacon
Francis  Bacon  was  the  first  to  synonymise  a  state  with  an  economy.  For 
Bacon  an  economy  was  the  state.  This  was  a  mistake.  An  economy  is  not  a 
state and a state is  not an economy. A  state or a polis has an economy.  First one 
must build a state as a precondition for a thriving and developing economy.
Supply-Side  E co n o m ics
Free  enterprise  or capitalist economies  have  had  a  tendency  or inclination 
towards  either  “demand-side”  (or  Keynesian  and  Galbraithian)  thinking,  or 
“supply-side”  thinking  as  articulated  by  Adam  Smith  and  George  Gilder.  In 
the  welfare  capitalist  state  since  the  N ew   Deal  o f  the  1930s  the  dominant 9
9 John Paul  II,  "Centessimus Annus”, 
Origins,
  vol.  21,  no.  1,  May  1
6
,  1991,  p.  2-24.

16
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
orthodoxy  has  been  demand-side  thinking  in  which  the  emphasis  has  been 
on  demand  as  an  engine  o f  growth.  And,  o f  course,  wealthy,  developed 
countries  can  and  perhaps  should  afford  demand-side  policies  for  some 
time.  But  not  forever.  Underdeveloped  or  developing  economies  (or  mined 
ones  like  in  the  former  USSR),  on  the  other  hand,  are  better served  by  sup­
ply-side  economics  in  which  the  inventive  supply  and  production  o f goods 
creates  a  demand and fuels  the  economy.
Foreign Aid
Take the  issue  o f foreign  aid.  Should the West aid  the  ailing  economies  o f 
the  East?  Should  the  newly  independent  states  ask  for  foreign  aid?  Will  for­
eign  aid  help  or  hinder?  Contemporary supply-side  experts  on  development 
like  Professor  Peter  Berger  go  so  far  as  to  say  that  foreign  aid  has  caused 
underdevelopment.  In  other  words,  it  seems  that  the  newly  independent 
states  o f  eastern  Europe  will  have  to  virtually  pull  themselves  up  by  their 
own bootstraps.
T h e  Prim acy of  Foreign P o licy
Here  w e  come  to  “the  primacy o f foreign  policy  over domestic  policy”,  as 
taught  by  Dmytro  Dontsov  and  usually  inverted  by  modern  political  ana­
lysts.  The  new   states  need  an  independent,  loyal  military  for  self-defence 
and  protection,  and  that  must  be  one  o f  the  first  acts  o f  nation-  or  state­
building in eastern Europe.
In  the  old  pre-communist  patrimonial  regime  and  during  the  communist 
era  in  the  USSR,  Ukraine  was  a  subject  o f Russia’s  foreign  policy  in  spite  o f 
Russia’s  propaganda  about  family,  fraternity  and  "little  brotherhood”.  In  the 
post-communist  order  o f  independent  states  Ukrainian-Russian  relations 
must  continue  as  foreign  policy  relations.  But  it  must  be  remembered  that 
unlike  domestic  policy,  foreign  policy  can  change  suddenly,  radically  and 
forcefully.  Therefore,  just  as  politics  must  drive  economics,  foreign  policy 
must  drive  domestic  policy  and  the  prospect  o f  sudden  foreign  policy 
changes must be  faced squarely.
From   Under the  Rubble
A   truly  independent,  autonomous  and  sovereign  state  based  on  its  own 
rule  o f law designed to protect the basic God-given  human  rights  and  liberty 
(political  and  econom ic)  o f  individuals  is  the  ultimate  assurance  that  all 
remaining  vestiges  o f  communism  and  imperialism  will  be  removed.  But 
before  w e  can build these  newly-independent states in  what were  previous­
ly captive nations w e  must first get out from under the  rubble. 1
0
10 G eorge Gilder, 
Wealth and Poverty,
  N e w  York,  Basic Books,  1981.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
17
T o   do  that  w e  must  remember  Professor Murray  Rothbard’s  recent  obser­
vation  about  de-nazification  and  de-communisation  and  the  double  standard 
that still  continues  to exist in  the  West.  Professor Rothbard said:
“Regarding  Europe  I  have  a  nagging  tw o-fold  question:
Why  has  no  one  remarked  on  the  incredible  double  standard 
in  establishment  treatment  o f ex-nazi  and  communist  regimes?
Both  were  despotic,  evil  and  genocidal.  After  W orld  War  II 
Nazis  and  collaborators  were:  (1)  slaughtered  on  the  spot  by 
vengeful  Communist  successor-regimes  or  by  Communist  par­
tisans  (as  in  Italy  and  France);  (2 )  indicted  and  convicted  by 
the  Allies  and  then  successor  regimes  for  ‘war  crimes’  against 
humanity  with  leaders  put  to  death  or  sentenced  to  long  jail 
terms;  (3 )  masses  o f  officials  w ere  'denazified  and  jailed  or 
prevented  from  holding  office’;  and  (4)  for  the  past  47  years 
alleged  ex-nazis  were  made  to  stand  trial  in  their  Communist- 
run homelands  or Israel.
Consider  the  contrast  in  treating  Communists  since  1989.
Not  only  guards  but  high  officials,  even  secret  police  officials, 
have  not  only  not  been  executed  or  tried  for  their  crimes 
against humanity,  but  most o f them are  still  there,  still  in  place 
—   either  as  bureaucrats  serving  new  regimes  or  as  ‘former’ 
Communists  n ow   calling  themselves  ‘social-dem ocrats’  or 
whatever.  There  has  been  no  policy  o f de-communization  and 
no  lustration law ”.11
And before  a  new house  or an  independent nation-state  can  be  construct­
ed  the  ruins  o f the  previous structure  must be  completely cleared. 

11 
Murray  Rothbard,  “Cultural  Revolutions:  Regarding  Europe” ,  Chronicles,  October 
1992,  p.  7-8.

18
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
THE  FORMATION  OF LEGAL TIES  BETWEEN 
THE  EUROPEAN  COMMUNITY AND UKRAINE
Victor Muravyev
The  history o f direct legal  relations  between the  European Community (EC) 
and Ukraine  is rather short and fairly uneventful.  There  are  several  reasons  for 
this.  To  start with  one  should  recall  that  official  relations  between  the  EC  and 
the  former  USSR  (which  included  Ukraine)  were  established  only  in  June 
1988,  when  the Joint  Declaration  on  Mutual  Recognition  between  the  EC  and 
the  Council  for  Mutual  Economic  Assistance  (COMECON)  was  signed  in 
Luxembourg.!  This  paved  the  way for the  conclusion,  at the  end  o f 1989,  o f a 
trade,  commercial  and  economic  cooperation  agreement  between  the  USSR 
and the EC and also an  agreement on trade in textile  products.2
The  collapse  o f the  USSR,  following  the  landslide  vote  for  independence 
in  the  all-Ukrainian  referendum  o f  December  1,  1991,  aborted  a  projected 
new   broader  agreement  between  the  EC  and  the  Soviet  Union.  This  had 
been  proposed  by  France  and  Germany  only  one  year  after  the  first  agree­
ment  between  the  two  sides  was  signed.  The  proposed  agreement  had  had 
twin  aims:  political  and  economic.  It was  intended  to  reflect  the  EC  commit­
ments  to  democratic  reform  within  the  Soviet  empire,  on  the  one  hand, 
while,  on  the  other,  it  might  have  led  to  the  formation  in  the  foreseeable 
future  o f  a  free  trade  area  including  the  Common  Market  and  the  internal 
market o f the  USSR.
The  overw h elm in g  pro-independence  vote  o f  the  Ukrainian  p eop le 
prompted  the  EC  to  issue  on  December  2,  1991,  a  Declaration  on  Ukraine.3 
This  welcom ed  the  democratic  manner  in  which  the  referendum  had  been 
conducted  and  called  for  Ukraine  to  pursue  an  open  and  constructive  dia­
logue  with  the  other  republics  o f  the  dying  Soviet  state  in  order  to  ensure 
that  all  existing  international  obligations  were  maintained.  It  also  included  a 
number o f clauses  relating  to  Ukraine’s  commitments  to  respect  all  the  inter­
national  obligations  o f  the  USSR  in  the  realm  o f  arms  control  and  nuclear 
non-proliferation.  In the  Declaration  the  EC  called  on  Ukraine  to  accept joint 
liability  for the  Soviet  Union’s  foreign  debts.
The  response  o f newly-independent  Ukraine  to  this  document  and  similar 
acts  o f  a  number  o f   other  states  was  very  rapid  and  constructive.  On
Victor  Muravyev,  a  lawyer,  holds  a  doctorate  in  law   from  Kyiv  University.  H e  is  a  Professor 
at  the  Department  o f   International  Law  o f   the  Ukrainian  Institute  o f  International  Relations, 
w h ere he teaches  European Community law  and  international  law.
1  See: 
Official Journal o f  the European Community (OJEC),
  1988,  LI 57/35.
2 See: 
OJEC,
  1989,  L 397/2, 
OJEC,
  1990,  L 68/2.
5  Source:  EC  Commission.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
19
Decem ber  5,  1991,  the  Ukrainian  Parliament  adopted  an  “Appeal  to  the 
Parliaments  and  People’s  o f the  W orld”  expressed  its  willingness  to  comply 
with  all the  main  provisions  o f the EC  Declaration.4 5
Nevertheless,  it has  taken  some  time  for the  EC  to  accept  the  new  realities 
which emerged  after  the  breakdown  o f the  USSR.  The  process  o f rapproche­
ment  between  the  EC  and  Ukraine  has  not  always  been  totally  smooth  and, 
on  occasion,  has  been  fraught  with  misunderstandings.  Thus,  the  EC  turned 
out  to  be  among  a  small  group  o f  somewhat  confused  states  and  interna­
tional  organisations  which  precipitated  the  official  recognition  o f  the  so 
called  Commonwealth  o f Independent  States  —   to  the  great  surprise  o f  the 
parties  to the  agreement on  the  CIS  w ho when signing  it  had  no  intention  of 
creating a  new international  legal  entity.
On  the  other  hand,  the  EC  and  its  member  states  realised  fairly  rapidly 
that  the  collapse  o f  the  USSR  w ou ld  demand  the  reappraisal  o f  their 
approach  towards  the  newly  independent  states  (NIS).  N ow   they  w ould 
have  to  deal  with  each  republic  separately,  even  while  at  the  same  time  try­
ing  to  maintain  the  economic  and  political  stability o f the territory  o f the  for­
mer  Soviet  empire  by  preserving  existing  ties  among  the  NIS.  For  this  rea­
son,  in  the  first  half o f  1992  the  EC  institutions  adopted  several  decisions  on 
the  distribution  among  the  NIS  o f import and export  quotas  formerly  allocat­
ed  to  the  Soviet Union.5
Parallel  to  all  this,  the  EC  began  reallocating  its  economic  and  technical 
assistance  to  the  former  USSR.  At  the  beginning  o f  1992  the  technical  assis­
tance  programme  was  reshaped  and  renamed  TACIS  (Technical  Assistance 
for  the  Commonwealth  o f  Independent  States).  This  programme  aims  at 
helping  the  recipients  to  introduce  a  system  o f  trade  regulation  compatible 
with  the  General  Agreement  on  Tariffs  and  Trade  (GATT).  Such  a  system 
will  facilitate  the  subsequent  integration  o f the CIS  states  into  the  open  inter­
national  system  and,  in  time,  further improvements  in  access  to  markets.
The  areas  covered by TACIS  include  human  resources’  development,  food 
production  and  distribution,  networks  (energy,  transport  and  telecommuni­
cations),  enterprise  support  services,  and  nuclear  safety.  Within  the  frame­
work  o f TACIS,  new  indicative  programmes  have  been  signed  with  each  of 
the  former  republics,  including  Ukraine,  reflecting  their  particular  needs. 
Thus,  o f the  300  M  ECU  allocated in  1992  to  indicative  programmes,  Ukraine 
received  47  M  ECU.6  Particular  emphasis  is  placed  on  the  sphere  o f  privati­
sation  in  Ukraine.
EC  efforts  in  the  field o f nuclear safety were extended  in June  1992  by  the 
signing  o f an  agreement  with  Russia,  Belarus  and  Ukraine  setting  up  a  pro­
4 See: 
Hobs Ukrainy,
  Decem ber 7,  1991,  p.  2.
5  See  Commission  Regulation  N   723/92  o f March  23,  1992,  OJEC  L  79/5;  Council  Regulation 
N   848/92  o f   March  31,  1992, 
OJEC
 L  89/1;  Council  Decision  o f   March  31,  1992, 
OJEC
 N o.  L 
89/3;  etc.
6 Source:  EC  Commission.

20
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
gramme  for  studying  the  radioactive  contamination  resulting  from  the 
Chornobyl  disaster.  This  programme  is  intended  to  broaden  the  technical 
skills  needed  to  contain such  accidents,  to  improve  emergency  management 
procedures,  and so  on.  The  total  cost o f the  programme  is  10 M  ECU.7
However,  the  most  dramatic  step  made  by  the  EC  in  its  relations  with 
Ukraine  and  other  NIS  was  the  decision  to  reach  an  agreement  on  coopera­
tion  with  each  o f  them  individually.  On  April  6,  1992,  the  EC  Commission 
submitted  to  the  EC  Council  o f  Ministers  a  directive  on  the  negotiation  of 
cooperation  agreements  with  Russia,  Belarus,  Kazakhstan  and  Ukraine. 
These  will  replace  the  1989  treaty  with  the  USSR  on  trade,  commercial  and 
econom ic  cooperation,  the  provisions  o f  which  the  EC  has  continued  to 
apply  up  to  now.  The  new  agreements  constitute  a  further  step  forward  in 
the  recognition  o f  the  drastic  changes  that  have  occurred  in  this  region. 
They  will  put  an  end  to  the  sometimes  ambiguous  stance  taken  by  the  EC 
with  regard  to  the  CIS,  since  their conclusion  will  mean  the  establishment  o f 
permanent  bilateral  political  and  economic  relations  between  the  EC  and 
each  o f the  other  NIS  with  which  separate  agreements  will  be  reached.  For 
Ukraine,  this  means  the  start  o f  a  process  o f  integration  into  the  larger 
Europe  on  the  basis  o f  geographical  position  and  the  sharing  o f  common 
political,  economic and legal values.
Nevertheless,  some  time  still  had  to  elapse  before  the  EC  and  Ukraine 
began  their  first  contacts  aimed  at  the  conclusion  o f  such  a  cooperation 
agreement.  This  delay  may  be  explained  by  several  factors.  Firstly,  it  seems 
that  the  Western  World  had  been  bewildered  by  the  fact  that Ukraine  estab­
lished  its  independence  so  rapidly  and  so  peacefully.  The  West  needed 
time,  therefore,  to  formulate  its  strategy  towards  this  “n ew ”  country.  The 
lack  o f  a  coherent  policy  towards  Ukraine  was  concealed  by  eloquent  dis­
cussions  on  the  place  o f  Ukraine  in  the  future  European  structure  and  the 
need  for  Ukraine  to  maintain  her  traditional  economic  ties  with  the  other 
NIS  on  account  o f the  high  degree  o f regional  specialisation  within  the  for­
mer  USSR,  the  heavy  degree  o f interdependence,  and  the  fact  that  it  would 
be  counter-productive  to  erect  new  trade  barriers  between  the  independent 
republics,  just  at  the  time  when  the  Maastricht Treaty stipulated  the  elimina­
tion  o f the  remaining economic  and  legal  restrictions  within  the  EC.
It  seems,  however,  that  the  most  important  fact  is  that  the  EC  was  unwill­
ing  to  disrupt  the  established  pattern  o f  relationship  between  its  members 
and what  had been  the  former USSR.  In these  relations  the  Soviet  Union  had 
served  mainly  as  a  supplier  o f raw  materials  to  Western  Europe  and  consti­
tuted  a  very  large  potential  market  for  goods  from  the  EC.  Hence  the  EC 
was  rather  reluctant  at  first  to  assist  the  NIS  to  carry  out  structural economic 
reforms.  Quite  obviously  the  EC  is  not  interested  in  new  competitors  in  its 
own  market,  particularly  at  a  time  when  some  o f its  member  states  such  as
7 Source:  EC  Commission.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
21
France,  Germany  and  Great  Britain  are  facing  serious  economic  problems 
while  the  prospects  for consolidation  within  the  EC  are  not too bright.
This  approach  can  be  observed  in  some  publications  analysing  the  rela­
tions  betw een  the  EC  and  Eastern  Europe,  the  authors  o f  which,  while 
admitting  that  in  terms  o f  economic  cooperation,  the  EC  and  Ukraine  can 
complement each  other,  nevertheless  assign  Ukraine  a  place  in  the  backyard 
o f the  larger Europe.8 9
As  for  the  Ukrainian  policy  towards  the  EC,  this  is  based  on  a  strong 
desire  to becom e  an  integral  part o f the enlarged  European economic,  politi­
cal  and  legal  space.  The  arguments  are  that  geographically  Ukraine  is  situat­
ed  in  the  heart  o f  Europe,  and  has  various  ties,  deeply  rooted  in  history, 
with  a  large  number  o f  European  countries.  On  the  other  hand,  Ukraine  is 
very  keen  to  reshape  the  whole  spectrum  o f  her  relations  with  her  neigh­
bours  in  order  to  make  them  more  efficient.  It  is  well  understood  by  many 
Ukrainian  politicians  that  if  the  country  wants  to  be  an  integral  part  o f  the 
larger European  area,  she  must live up  to  common  European  standards.
Accordingly,  the  Ukrainian  officials  in  charge  o f  foreign  policy  have 
w ork ed   out  a  system  o f   priorities  in  which  cooperation  with  Western 
Europe  is  considered  o f  paramount  importance,  ranking  immediately  after 
ties with  the  countries  contiguous  to  Ukraine.  To some  extent this essentially 
pragmatic  system  resembles  the  concept  o f concentric  circles  so  dear  to  the 
heart o f the  EC Commissioner Jacques  Delors.
However,  one  has  to  admit  that the  Ukrainian  system  needs  more  precise 
definition  as  regards  the  EC  as  a  whole.  It  is  even  more  important  to  have 
proper  financial  resources  and  personnel  possessing  the  expertise  to  deal 
with  the  EC  in  order  to  bring  this  concept  to  life.  Unfortunately,  nowadays 
Ukraine  suffers  from  a  lack  o f both  money and  qualified  personnel.
Despite  this  unfavourable  background,  both  Ukraine  and  the  EC  have 
managed  to  reach  many  points  o f  common  interest.  The  rapprochement 
between  them  was  reinforced  by  the  talks  between Jacques  Delors  and  the 
Ukrainian  President  Leonid  Kravchuk  in  Brussels  on  September  14,  1992. 
This was  the  first meeting  o f the  highest officials  from both  sides.
In  his  address  to  the  meeting  Leonid  Kravchuk  praised  the  launch  o f 
TACIS  and  promised  to  base  Ukraine’s  cooperation  with  the  EC  on  the  prin­
ciples  o f  the  CSCE  Final  Act  ("Helsinki  Accords").  Kravchuk  and  Delors 
signed  a Joint Statement  confirming the  need  to  formalise  by  an  exchange  o f 
letters  the  continuing  mutual  obligations  o f  Ukraine  and  the  EC  under  the 
above-mentioned  trade  agreements  o f  1989.  They  also  expressed  their inten­
tion  to  reach  an  agreement on  partnership  and  cooperation.  It  was  agreed  to 
set up  a  Ukrainian  permanent  mission  to  the  EC  and  a  delegation  o f the  EC 
Commission  to  Ukraine.?
8  See,  for  instance,  Perdita  Fraser, 
The  Post-Soviet  States  and  the  European  Community, 
London,  1992,  p.  25-26.
9 Source:  EC  Commission.
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   ...   44


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling