Editorial board slava stetsko


  G overnm ental  p o licy and  inter-ethnic  relatio ns


Download 16.82 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet14/44
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi16.82 Mb.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   44

3.  G overnm ental  p o licy and  inter-ethnic  relatio ns
Before  1991  Ukrainian  governmental  policy  in  many  aspects  ran  counter 
to  the  programme  o f Rukh.  The  first  Congress  o f Rukh  in  1989  appointed  a 
“Council  o f Peoples"  as  one  o f its  divisions  in  order  to  work  to  prevent  dis­
crimination  on  ethnic  grounds.  In  response  to  these  activities  o f   Rukh,  and 
to  offset their effect,  the  then  government sponsored  the  establishment  o f an 
official  Council  o f  National  (ethnic)  Societies.  The  revival  o f  ethnic  aware­
ness  among  the  minority  groups,  together  with  the  campaigning  efforts  of 
certain  radical  pro-autonomy  movements  influenced  the  governm ent  to 
organise  a  Committee  on  Nationality  Affairs  as  a  department  o f  the  Council 1
0
10 Previous samples gave less encouraging  figures o f  ethnic  Russians’ political  behaviour.  The 
1990  sample  data  ga ve  48%  o f   ethnic  Russian  electors  in  favour  o f   independent  Ukraine  and 
38%  against.  See:  Resolution  "O n  inter-ethnic  relations  in  Ukraine”  o f  the  Second  All-Ukrainian 
Congress o f  Rukh,  28 O ctober  1990,  in 
Sucasnist
,  1991,  No.  1,  p.  172.

36
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
o f Ministers  (later —   Cabinet  o f Ministers)  in July  1991.  Until  summer  1991, 
the  Communist  government  tried  to  manipulate  the  ethnic  movements  and 
to  provoke  splits  in  the  Kyiv  Jewish  Society,  the  Republic  Turkophone 
Centre  and the  German  Society.  But  the  establishment in January  1991  o f an 
All-Ukrainian  Round  Table  o f  Ethnic  Minorities’  Organisations,  which  was 
subsequently  transformed  into  the  Democratic  League  o f  Minorities  forced 
the  government to take the  ethnic movements  more  seriously.
The  official  task  o f  the  Committee  on  Nationality  Affairs  was  to  prepare 
and  implement  legal  regulations  for  minorities  and  to  help  satisfy  the  social 
and  cultural  needs  o f ethnic  minority  groups.  In  autumn  1991  the  Ukrainian 
Parliament  passed  a  package  o f  legal  documents  granting  minorities  equal 
rights  in  political,  economic,  cultural  and  social  life.  Under  the  terms  of the 
Declaration  on  the  Rights  o f Minorities  (November  1991) ethnic  communities 
w ere  ensured  the  opportunity  to  use  their  native  language,  in  areas  o f con­
centrated  settlement,  in  administrative  and  governmental  services,  as  well  as 
the  right  to  territorial  ethno-cultural  autonomy,  including  the  establishment 
o f  ethnic  administrative  areas.  Bulgarian  and  Hungarian  ethnic  local  areas 
have  already been established  in  the west and south.
There  is  serious  evidence  to  suggest  that  Kravchuk’s  administration  con­
sciously  tried  to  capture  the  initiative  from  Rukh  and  the  ethnic  movements 
and to  implement certain  points  o f Rukh’s  programme  in  order to  pacify and 
harmonise  inter-ethnic  relations  as  well  as  to  neutralise  the  influence  o f the 
political  opposition  led by Vyacheslav Chornovil.
The  official  concept o f the  state-building  process  has  been  summarised  in 
various  documents  and  statements.  In  his  address  to  the  World  Congress  o f 
Ukrainians  on  21  August  1992,  Leonid  Kravchuk  spoke  o f the  formation  o f a 
new   nation-state  entity  which  must  include  all  the  principal  ethnic  groups 
living  in  Ukraine.  The  President’s  address  dealt  with  such  concepts  as  the 
participation  o f  the  w h ole  population  o f  Ukraine  in  the  state-building 
process;  the  inclusion  o f ethnic  groups  as  integral  components  to  the  civic 
nation  and  civic  society  on  the  basis  o f  citizenship  and  equality  in  civil 
rights  and  responsibilities;  the  leading  role  o f Ukrainians  in  the  nation-state 
building activities.11
This  new  understanding  o f  the  “nation"  as  a  form  o f  civil  society,  rather 
than  an ethnic community  is  now shared by the  majority o f intellectual  leaders 
o f  the  Ukrainian  national  movement.  The  well  known  writer  and  former 
political  prisoner  Ivan  Dzyuba,  who  became  Minister  o f  Culture  in  Leonid 
Kuchma’s Cabinet in October  1992,  also  noticed this  change  in  the  concept o f 
the  nation  and  together  with  corresponding  changes  in  the  character  o f 
Ukrainian  nationalism.  Dzyuba  wrote  that  the  “Ukrainian  nation-state  will  fol­
low   the  principle  o f national  interest  and  national  priorities  in  the  meaning  o f 
statehood but not ethnicity,  as do  modern developed  democratic states”.1
1
 12
11 
Holos Ukrainy,
  22  August  1992,  p.  3,  7.
12 Ivan  Dzyuba, "Ukraine on the path o f state-building",  in 
Slovo i chas
 (Kyiv),  1992,  No.l  1, p.  10.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
37
Since  independence,  various  changes  have  taken  place  simultaneously  in 
the  character o f Ukrainian  nationalism,  which  has  almost cease  to exist in  an 
ethnic  form  and  has  incorporated  the  idea  o f a  civil  nation-state.  During  this 
time,  the  main  challenges  to  national  security  in  the  sphere  o f  inter-ethnic 
relations  have  thus  been  those  posed  by  local  ethnic  nationalisms  and 
regional  separatist  movements,  together  with  external  territorial  claims  and 
foreign  illegal  activities.
Before  December  1991  no  phenomena  o f  the  “ethnic  vote”  type  were 
visible  in  Ukraine.  N o  political  parties  or  movements  based  on  ethnicity 
em erged except the  Republican Movement  o f Crimea  (since  September  1992 
—   the  Russophone  M ovem ent  o f  Crimea)  and  some  radical  Ukrainian 
nationalist  groups  in  western  Ukraine,  w ho  are  generally  known  under  the 
collective  tide  o f  the  Ukrainian  National  Assembly.  But  although  the  mem­
bership  o f  these  organisations  was  built  up  predominantly  along  ethnic 
lines,  their  aims  were  purely  political.  The  first  case  o f the  principle  o f “eth­
nic  voting  being  applied  was  during  the  independence  referendum  o f 1991, 
when the  Romanian minority  in  the Chernivtsi  region  abstained en  bloc.
During  the  presidential  elections  o f  1  December  1991  an  ethnic  Russian, 
Vladimir  Grinev,  from  Kharkiv  received  1.33  million  votes  (4.17%).  Although 
he  did  much  better  in  eastern  Ukraine,  w here  a  greater  proportion  o f 
Ukraine’s  Russians  reside,  he  could  in  no way be  regarded  as  a  political  rep­
resentative  o f ethnic Russian  interests.  Some  regional  political  parties  o f east­
ern  Ukraine,  such  as  the  Liberal  Party  o f  Ukraine  (founded  in  Donetsk  in 
1991)  and,  in  particular,  the  Citizens’  Congress  which  emerged  in  Kharkiv  in 
1992,  demanded  official  recognition  o f  the  equal  status  o f  the  Russian  and 
Ukrainian  languages  at  the  regional  level  and  a  Federal-type  constitution  for 
Ukraine.  But even these groups  have  no  clearly stated ethnic  orientation.
Evidence  o f  strong  centrifugal  trends  may  be  discerned  in  the  political 
demands  o f  certain  regional  and  local  industrial  and  administrative  élites, 
which  have  considerable  influence  in  Kharkiv,  the  Donbas,  Dnipropetrovsk 
and  Zaporizhzhya  and  which,  potentially,  can  exploit  current  trends  in  the 
political  behaviour  o f the  Russian  population.  The  most  dangerous  develop­
ment is  an  increasing  dissatisfaction  with  the  policy o f the  Ukrainian  govern­
ment which  is  clearly  incapable  o f managing  the economic  crisis.  The  totally 
incompetent  and  dangerously  ineffective  economic  policy  implemented  by 
the  government  o f Vitold  Fokin  (in  power until  October  1992)  destroyed  the 
illusions  o f many  o f the  less  politically  aware  who  had voted  in  favour o f an 
independent  Ukraine  in  December  1991  in  the  hope  that  this  would  mean 
an  immediate  economic  recovery  and  a  higher  standard  o f  living  than  Lhat 
o f  Russia.  But  during  1992,  the  continuing  hyperinflation  o f  up  to  2,500% 
(double  that  o f Russia)  seriously  affected  the.social  sphere.  Permanent  pres­
sure  from  the  Moscow politicians,  who  expressed  a  deep  desire  to  intervene 
in  Ukrainian  politics,  together  with  a  general  dissatisfaction  with  the  ec o ­
nomic  situation  intensified  the  desire  for  autonomy  in  such  multi-ethnic 
areas  Luhansk,  Donetsk,  Transcarpathia  and  Crimea.  At  the  same  lime,

38
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
regional  political  organisations  which  emphasise  the  necessity  o f  regional 
self-government  are  gathering  strength:  the  Civic  Congress  o f  Ukraine,  the 
Party  o f  Labour  o f  Ukraine,  the  Movement  for  a  Democratic  Donbas,  the 
Movement for  the  Revival  o f the  Donbas,  the  Civic  Union,  and some  region­
al groups  in  the  Socialist and Liberal  Parties.
National  security  problems  were  complicated  by  the  presence  o f  foreign 
troops,  which were  officially subordinate  to  the  General  Headquarters  o f the 
Commonwealth  o f  Independent  States  Unified  Armed  Forces  but  which  in 
fact  remained under  the  political  control  o f the  Russian  Federation.  Many  o f 
the  Russian  officers  o f  these  units,  often  in  association  with  retired  ex-ser­
vicemen  and  veterans  o f  the  Afghanistan  war,  engaged  in  illegal  activities 
such  as  the  formation  and  training  o f Russian-oriented Cossack  squadrons  in 
som e  areas  o f  Ukraine.1?  The  first  Cossack  units  affiliated  to  the  Don 
Cossack  army  were  formed  in  1992  near  Luhansk  with  the  tacit  permission 
o f the  local  authorities.  These  attempts  to establish  Cossack  units  in  Luhansk 
(which  in  the  end  proved unsuccessful)  were  influenced  by  emissaries  from 
the  Rostov-on-Don  area,  just  across  the  Ukrainian-Russian  frontier.  But  the 
rise  o f  the  Cossack  movement  in  the  Bolgrad  area  near  Odessa  was  the 
direct  result  o f  the  activities  o f certain  officers  o f  the  the  Airborne  Division 
o f  the  CIS  Strategic  Forces.  This  division,  which  was  based  in  the  Bolgrad 
ra y on   (co u n ty )  o f   Ukraine,  and  which  also  operated  in  Gagausia,  in 
Southern  M oldova,  was  a  disciplined,  pro-Communist  force  which  was 
involved  in  the  attempted  hardline  Moscow  coup  o f August  1991.  Under  trie 
terms  o f the  Alma-Ata  Agreement  on  Strategic  Forces  o f 21  December  1991, 
this  Division  was  placed  under  the  administrative  and  operational  control  o f 
Moscow,  but  was  financed  by  the  Ukrainian  government.  Although  the  the 
Airborne  Division  did  not take  part in  the Transdnistrian  conflict in Moldova, 
the  em ergence  o f  the  pro-Russian  Black  Sea  Cossack  movement  in  the 
Bolgrad  area  may  be  considered  a  side-effect  o f that  conflict.  The  actions  o f 
the  aforesaid  officers  thus  established  a  strategically  located  Russian  beach­
head  far  b e y o n d   the  borders  o f  Russia.  Th e  first  Black  Sea  Cossack 
Assembly was  attended by the  Commander-in-Chief o f the Cossack  Union  o f 
Russia,  Martynov,  and  the  Don  Cossack senior official  Naumov.
At  the  turn  o f 1992-1993,  the  officers  o f the  the  Division  issued  a  demand 
that  the  Bolgrad  area  should  be  transformed  into  a  special  Cossack  "nation­
al”  administrative unit  ( natsionalny okrug) and  that  all  the  armed  forces  sta­
tioned  in  this  territory  should  be  subordinate  to  them.14  This  situation  was 
similar  to  what  happened  in  the  self-styled  “Dnister  republic”  in  Moldova,
'5  See  B.  Nahaylo, 
The New Ukraine,
  p. 
34  ,
  and J.  G ow ,  “Independent  Ukraine: T he  Politics 
o f  Security”,  in 
International Relations,Vol.
  XI,  No.  3,  Decem ber  1992,  p.  259-263.  The  number 
o f   CIS  and  other  Russian-controlled  troops  at  the  end  o f   1992  was  approxim ately  120-130,000 
m en  including  the  personnel  o f the  Black  Sea  Fleet,  the  status  o f  which  is  legally  defined  as  a 
joint  Russian-Ukrainian naval force for the three years'  term,  from   1992 to  1995.
14 
Ukrayinska Dum ka
 (London),  4  February  1993.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
39
where  the  majority  o f  the  staff  o f  the  14th  Russian  army  possessed  real 
estate  (houses,  apartments,  allotments,  vineyards,  etc.)  and  the  officers  were 
directly  involved  in  local  politics.  The  foundation  o f  an  autonomous  area 
around  Bolgrad was  also  seen  by  these  “Cossacks"  as  an  opportunity  to  set­
tle  there  permanently,  keep  their  arms  and  establish  a  pro-Russian  political 
enclave  in  Ukraine.  It should be  noted  in  this  context  that  in  February  1993, 
the  Vice-President  o f  Russia,  Alexander  Rutskoi,  prom ised  the  Russian 
Cossack movement that he  would seek for it to be given  the  official  status  of 
a  reserve  o f  the  Russian  army.1?  In  April  1993,  however,  an  agreement  was 
reached  betw een   the  Ukrainian  Ministry  o f  D efen ce  and  the  General 
Headquarters  o f  the  Russian  army,  under  the  terms  o f  w hich  the  the 
Division  will  be  divided  between  Russia  and  Ukraine.  Some  o f   its  officers 
will  be  transferred  back  to  Russia.  The  Russian  part  will  cease  to  exist  as  a 
separate  military unit,  and the  Ukrainian part will be  reorganised.
It  is  also  evident  that  the  present  armed  forces  o f  Ukraine  cannot  be 
regarded  as  a  normally  loyal  and  disciplined  army  o f  a  nation-state,  since 
they  are,  as yet,  not fully established,  while  it is  difficult to  predict the behav­
iour  o f a  significant  part  o f the  officer  corps  in  the  case  o f an  armed  conflict 
with  Russia.  In  these  circumstances  the  Ukrainian  government  and  presiden­
tial  administration  has  tried  to  tread  cautiously  on  controversial  issues  in 
order  to  safeguard  national  peace  and  is  making  efforts  to  strengthen  state 
power  and  preserve  territorial  integrity.  In  particular,  as  o f May  1993,  it  has 
still  not  fully  implemented  certain  measures  o f  the  1989  Language  Law, 
which  stipulates  the  introduction  o f  Ukrainian  as  the  State  Language  in 
administration,  education,  the  courts,  etc.  in all  parts' o f Ukraine.
During  1992,  certain  reforms  were  likewise  introduced  in  the  sphere  of 
executive  power.  A   Presidential  order  o f  14  April  1992  (with  the  amend­
ments  o f  24  July,  1992)  established  a  nation-wide  system  o f   local  state 
administration.  Under  the  terms  o f  these  Orders,  the  President  nominates 
heads  o f the  executive  power  at  every  level  o f local  government,  thus  pro­
viding  a  parallel  structure  to  the  existing  hierarchy  o f  oblast  (provincial), 
rayon (county),  city and  town councils.1
5
 16
Some  new  laws  enacted  by  Parliament  over  the  period  April-July  199217 
implemented  the  concepts  o f provincial  self-government (provincial  councils 
and  their  executive  committees)  and  local  government  (councils  and  their 
executives  in  Kyiv,  Sevastopol,  other  cities  and  towns,  rural  and  borough 
districts).  The  former  Soviet system  was  amended  and  divided  into  two  lev­
els  —   provincial  self-government  whose  functions  include  representation  of 
the  interests  o f  the  local  population  and  clearly  defined  responsibilities  in 
the  economic  and  social  spheres,  and  local  government  under  the  general
15 
Nezavisimaya Gazela
 (M oscow ),  5  February  1993.
16 “A   Regulation on local  state administration”,  in 
Holos Ukrainy,
  8  August  1992,  p.  4-6.
17  Law  o f  Ukraine  “O n  a  Representative  o f  the  President  o f  Ukraine”,  and  the  law  "On  local 
Councils  o f  p eople's deputies  and regional  Self-government” .

40
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
control  o f the state  administration.  This  measure  seriously  limited  the  capaci­
ty  o f  regional  councils  to  express  demands  for  autonomy  and  evoked  the 
resistance  o f  certain  influential  provincial  circles  and  som e  groups  in 
Parliament,  including the  Speaker,  Ivan  Plyushch.
After some  sharp  exchanges  in  Parliament,  it was  decided  to  hold  a  con­
ference  on  “Current  problems  o f  Territorial  Government  in  Ukraine”,  in 
order  to  resolve  the  contradictions  between  the  new  State  Administration 
Structure  controlled  by  the  President,  and  the  old  system  o f   local  and 
regional  councils.  This  took  place  at  Kyiv  University  on  26-27  Novem ber 
1992,  and  the  tw o   main  sp eech es  at  this  co n feren ce  w e re   m ade  b y  
Kravchuk and Plyushch.
It  is  quite  clear that Kravchuk’s  views  are  more  akin  to  the  French  model 
o f   a  unitary  state  (possessing,  how ever,  regional  councils  with  limited 
responsibility  and  a  special  status  for  Corsica).  In  his  speech,  Kravchuk 
stressed  the  need  to  prevent  separatist  trends  at  the  regional  level  and  to 
formulate  a  concept  o f regional  policy  which  would  help  to  solve  the  most 
difficult problems  o f the  regions.  He  rejected  the  idea  o f administrative  terri­
torial  reform  in  the  immediate  future  as  dangerous.  But in  the  long term,  the 
President  did  not  object  to  the  decentralisation  o f power even at  the  region­
al  level  —   once  the  requirements  o f  state-building  had  been  met.18 1
9
  This 
promise  o f devolution  o f a  part o f the  state  powers  to  the  regional  councils 
was  designed to satisfy  the  ambitions  o f the  regional  establishments.
Plyushch’s speech embodied a  different view  o f the  role  o f regional  coun­
cils  and  their executives.  It  proposed  to  give  the  provinces  (ob la sti)  the  sta­
tus  o f “state  territories”  (derzhavni terytoriyi) with  limited  legislative  powers 
and  some  kind  o f  administrative  autonomy1?  —   in  West  European  terms, 
something between  the  German  lander and Italian  provincial  structures.
These  problems  o f  regional  self-government  and  administrative  territorial 
reform  w ere  directly  connected  with  the  debates  on  the  draft  o f  a  new 
Ukrainian  constitution  published  on  1  July  1992.  This  draft  proposed  a 
bicameral  parliament  in  which  the  second  chamber,  to  be  called  the  House 
o f  Representatives,  w ould  be  a  form  o f  regional  territorial  representation 
(Article  128).  In  addition,  Article  228  on  regional  self-government  envisaged 
territorial  units  o f two  levels  —   provinces 
(oblasti)  and  smaller  units,  coun­
ties  (rayony).  The  responsibilities  o f these  counties  would  not  include  leg­
islative  functions.20 At  the  same  time  the  plenary  powers  o f self-government 
w ou ld  be  increased  and  there  were  some  provisions  in  the  constitution 
which  envisaged constitutional  changes  in the  future.
18  T h e   G overning  o f   territories  in  Ukraine.  Theses  o f   a  draft  report  o f   L.  M.  Kravchuk,  in 
Uryadovyi Kuryer,
  No.  54-55,  20 N ovem ber  1992, p.  3-
19 T h e  G overning  o f  territories  in  Ukraine.  Theses o f  a  draft  presentation o f  I.  S.  Plyushch,  in 
Uriadovyi Kuyer,
  No.  54-55,  20  N ovem b er 1992,  p.  3,  6.
20  See  T he  Constitution  o f  Ukraine.  A   draft  endorsed  by the  Supreme  Council  for  a  national 
discussion,  1 July  1992,  in 
H obs Ukrainy,
  17 July 1992, p. 7,12.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
41
From  the  point  o f view  o f the  presidential  administration  and  the  govern­
ment,  it  also  seemed  necessary  to  impose  legal  restrictions  on  separatist 
activities  and  ban  anti-constitutional  behaviour  by  local  nationalist  ethnic 
movements  and groups.
4.  T h e   Q uestion of Crim ea
The  earliest  attempts  to  extend  regional  self-government  in  Crimea  were 
made  in  1990  and  early  1991.  In  January  1991,  the  local  Communist  Party 
ruling  élite,  administrative  group  led  by  the  Crimean  CP  First  Secretary, 
Nikolai  Bagrov,  held  a  referendum,  which  secured  the  peninsula  the  status 
o f an  autonomous  republic within  the  Ukrainian  SSR.  On  4  September  1991 
the  Crimean  Supreme  Soviet  (parliament)  declared  the  sovereignty  o f  the 
Crimean  Republic,  so  triggering  the  first constitutional  crisis  in  the  history  of 
independent Ukraine.
During  1991  two  other  referenda were  held in  Crimea,  associated  with  the 
wider  referenda  on  the  reform  o f  the  USSR  (17  March)  and  on  Ukrainian 
independence  (1  December).  During these referenda,  the  majority population 
o f Crimea voted to be  an integral  part o f an  independent Ukrainian state.
The  Republican  Movement  o f Crimea  (RMC)  was  founded  by  a  group  o f 
opposition  Russian  nationalists.  Its  avowed  aim  was  to  develop  and  defend 
Russian  identity  and  establish  an  independent  pro-Russian  republic  in 
Crimea.  Under  its  pressure,  in  July  1991,  Russian  was  adopted  as  a  “state 
language”,  side-by  side  with  Ukrainian,  within  Crimea.  The  separatists  in 
Crimea  were  organised  in  two  rival  groups:  Bagrov’s  ruling  élite  and  those 
Russian nationalists w ho wanted to seize power themselves.
Since January  1992  nationalist  parties  and  groups  in  the' parliament  o f the 
Russian  Federation  permanently  pressed  the  Crimean  question  and  put  for­
ward  territorial  claims  towards  Ukraine.  On  23 January  1992  the Russian  par­
liament  challenged  the  constitutional  legacy  o f the  1954  transfer  o f  Crimea 
from  the  Russian  Federation  to  Ukraine,  and  declared  this  decision  totally 
illegal  and  invalid  on  21  May,  soon  after  the  local  parliament  in  Simferopol 
proclaimed  the  full  independence  o f Crimea.  A  new  referendum  on  Crimean 
independence  was  scheduled  for  2  August  1992,  but  the  direct  intervention 
o f President  Kravchuk  and  the  Ukrainian  government  broke  up  these  RMC- 
initiated  plans  for  the  secession  o f Crimea.  The  local  referendum  was  post­
poned and then  finally  cancelled.
In  April  1992,  the  Ukrainian  Parliament  passed  a  law  “On  the  division  of 
powers  between  the  Governmental  structures  o f Crimea  and  Ukraine”.21  This 
was  amended  in  June  after  a  round  o f   negotiations  betw een   K yiv  and 
Simferopol  government  officials  on special  provisions  for Crimean  autonomy. 
Furthermore,  during these talks President Kravchuk threatened to give support 
to  the  claims  o f a  number  o f local  authorities  in  the  agricultural  areas  o f the
21 
Holos Ukrainy,
  25 July 1992, p.  9.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   44


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling