Editorial board slava stetsko


Download 16.82 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet15/44
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi16.82 Mb.
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   ...   44

42
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
north  and east o f the  peninsula who  wished  to secede  from  Crimea  itself and 
remain a part o f Ukraine,  should Crimean independence become  a  reality.
The  autumn  session  o f  the  Crimean  Parliament,  which  opened  on  24 
September  1992,  annulled  certain  previous Acts,  including  the  laws  on  sepa­
rate  Crimean  citizenship  and  on  the  President  o f Crimea  and  finally  rejected 
the  motion  to  hold  a  referendum  on  Crimean independence.22
The  balance  o f  forces  in  the  (formally  192-member)  Crimean  Parliament 
sh o w e d   that  the  number  o f   convinced  supporters  o f  the  Republican 
Movement  o f Crimea  constituted  a  minority  o f some  10  to  20%  o f members 
actually  present  at  the  session,  i.e.  from  16  to  32  out  o f  154  deputies  who 
took  part in  the voting.  The  new makeup  o f political  groups  in  the  local  par­
liament  comprised  several  main  trends.  The  “Party  o f power”  led  by  Bagrov 
has  become  more  moderate  since  the  negotiations  o f May  and June  1992,  as 
a  result  o f  which  Crimea  achieved  the  capabilities  and  rights  to  establish 
independent social,  economic and cultural  ties with other countries.
The  Left-Centrist  “Democratic Crimea"  parliamentary bloc  first  o f all  accept­
ed  for  tactical  reasons  Crimea’s  inclusion  in  Ukraine  and  then  decided  to 
cooperate  with  Kyiv-based  political  parties  o f a  similar orientation  and  to  par­
ticipate  in  Ukrainian  politics  as  an  autonomous  regional  political  movement, 
like the members  o f the Christian-Democratic bloc KDU/KSU  in Germany.
The  one  definitely  pro-Ukrainian  force  was  an  unstable  coalition  called 
“Crimea  with  Ukraine”,  which  included  local  sections  o f  Ukrainian  political 
parties  and  some  Crimean  regional  factions  and  groups  o f  various  political 
orientations.
During  spring  and  summer  1992,  another  political  bloc  called  the 
“Congress  o f People’s  Deputies:  ‘For Civil  Peace  and  Concord’”  began  to  be 
active  and gained  a  certain  political  influence  and  moral  authority  in  Crimea.
On  25  September  1992,  the  Crimean  Parliament  amended  the  constitution 
o f the  autonomous  republic,  bringing  it  into  accordance  with  the  Ukrainian 
law.  As  a  result,  the  Republican  Movement  o f Crimea  found  itself in  a  posi­
tion  o f  an  illegal  and  anti-constitutional  organisation.  Its  leaders  therefore 
were  forced  to  announce  the  dissolution  o f the  RMC  in  order  to  establish  a 
formally non-political  Russophone  movement o f Crimea.23
In  the  context  o f world  constitutional  experience,  the  present  position  o f 
Crimea  inside  Ukraine  is  somewhat  akin  to  the  status  o f  Northern  Ireland 
under  the  Government  o f Ireland  Act  1920,  in  force  in  this  province  o f the 
United  Kingdom until  1972.
Although the  internal  separatist forces  in  Crimea seem  temporarily to  have 
been  defeated,  the  situation  cannot  be  regarded  as  stable  and  secure,  on 
account o f the  offensive  tactics  o f the  majority o f members  o f the  Parliament
22  O lexandr  Pilat,  "The  Republic  o f   Crimea  has  its  o w n   flag  and  coat  o f   arms”,  in 
H obs 
Ukrainy,
  25 September  1992,  p.  3.
23  O lexan dr  Pilat,  "T h e  Republic  o f   Crimea  is  a  legal  dem ocratic  and  c ivic  state  inside 
Ukraine”,  in 
Holos  Ukrainy,
  29 September  1992,  p.  3-

CURRENT AFFAIRS
43
o f  the  Russian  Federation  and  the  direct  involvement  o f  many  Russian  offi­
cers  o f  the  Black  Sea  Fleet  in  the  political  struggle.  According  to  media 
reports,  in January  1993  the  Russian  Parliament  began  debating  the  political 
status  o f  Crimea  in  order  to  prepare  and  introduce  a  confederate  union 
between  Russia  and  Crimea  to  demand  some  form  o f  Russian-Ukrainian 
condominium  in  this  region  as  a  first  step  towards  Crimea’s  inclusion  into 
Russia.  A   radical  demand  for  some  form  o f  Russian  jurisdiction  over  the 
town  o f Sevastopol was  also  put forward  at  this  time.  24 2
5
During  the  first  few   weeks  o f  this  year,  the  separatist  movements  in 
Crimea  regrouped  themselves  into  a  coalition  o f  Russian  nationalist  and 
Communist  parties  and  movements  under  the  name  the  “People’s  Unity” 
C N arodnoye  Y ed in stvo).  It  includes  the  remnants  o f   the  Republican 
M ovem ent  o f  Crimea  (the  Republican  Party  o f  Crimea  and  the  Russian 
Society).  The  Union  o f  Communists  o f  Crimea,  the  Communist  Party  o f 
Employed  Persons,  the  Russian  Party  (founded  under  the  influence  of  the 
ultra-right  activist  Vladimir  Zhirinovskiy;  this  group  is  active  in  Sevastopol), 
and  the  Union  o f Russian Women o f Crimea.26
Another  problem  with  political  connotations  concerns  the  ethnic  move­
ment  o f  the  Crimean  Tatars.  Their  leading  organisation  named  the  Mejlis 
(parliament)  o f the  Crimean  Tatar  people  can  be  compared  with  the  Islamic 
parliament in the  UK  or with  the  Board o f Deputies  o f British Jews.  The  offi­
cial  programme  o f  the  M ejlis  is  to  bring  back  the  Crimean  Tatars  from 
Central  Asia,  to  safeguard  their  settlement  in  Crimea,  and  to  implement  the 
Crimean  Tatars’  right  to  national  self-determination  on  Crimean  territory  as 
their  historic patria.  Officially,  the  number  o f Crimean  Tatars  in  the  former 
Soviet  Union  is  about  500,000,  but the Tatar leaders  quote  figures  o f 600,000 
o f even  1,000,000  persons.
The  M ejlis  o f  the  Crimean  Tatar  people  has  pretensions  to  achieving 
international  respectability  and  recognition  in  the  Islamic  world.  During  his 
visit  to Turkey in March  1992  the  Speaker o f the  Mejlis,  Mustafa Jemilev,  was 
received  at  the  highest  diplomatic  level.26 While  adopting  a  generally  critical 
line,  Jemilev’s  stance  is  much  more  loyal  to  Kyiv  than  to  Simferopol.  In 
autumn  1992,  the  first  direct  clashes  between  Tatars  and  the  Crimean  local 
authorities  took  place.  There  are  some  militant  factions  in  the  Mejlis,  espe­
cially  the  semi-autonomous  organisation  “The  National  M ovem ent  o f 
Crimean  Tatars”,  which  tried  to  take  possession  o f  lands  on  the  sea  coast 
and in  October  1992  organised a  violent  attack  on  the  Simferopol  Parliament 
House  in  order  to  force  the  members  to  assign  more  territories  for  Tatar 
resettlement and  funds  for their social  and cultural  needs.
24  Elena  Nevelskaya,  “Crimea:  the  Russian  Parliament  discusses  the  versions” ,  in 
Rossiyskiye 
Vesti
 (M oscow ),  20 January  1993,  p.  1.
25  See:  Tatyana  Korobova,  “T he  People's  Unity”  —  under this  title  a  n ew   bloc  o f socio-politi­
cal  organisations  em erged in Crimea,  in 
Kievskiye  Vedomosti,
  29 April  1993,  p.  3.
26 
Holos Ukrainy,
  18 March  1992,  p.  14.

THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
The  Crimean  Tatar  movement  seems  to  be  the  most  contradictory  factor 
o f Crimean  politics  in  the  immediate  future.  Such  issues  as  the  stance  of the 
Turkish  government  and  ethnic  organisations  o f  Crimean  Tatar-descended 
persons  in  Turkey,  Islamic  influence  within  the  Tatar  community  in  Crimea 
and  dangerous  trends  in  relations  between  the  Tatars  and  the  local  Russian 
and  Ukrainian  population  could  possibly  pose  acute  problems  for  Ukraine’s 
national security policy in Crimea.
5.  A   model  of  security
The  analysis  o f inter-ethnic  relations  in  Ukraine  provides  an  opportunity  to 
elaborate  and  implement  a  general  security  model  for  the  whole  complex  of 
ethnicity  in  transitional  societies.  The  following  scheme  can  be  applied  to 
security  issues  and  national  security  policies  in  several  other  countries  which 
have  emerged  in  the  geopolitical  space  o f  the  former  Soviet  Union  and  in 
most  o f  East-European  states  as  well.  This  model  deals  predominantly  with 
the  whole  complex  o f ethnic  and  regional  politics  including  the  internal  and 
external dimensions o f inter-ethnic and international relations  on  a state  level.
General function: ethnicity and nationalism
The  main goals  o f the state  structures  in  this connection  are:
a)  to  preserve  the  integrity o f the state,
b )  to maintain civil  order,
c)  to  provide state-building processes.
At  the  basic  level,  this  presupposes  the  following  internal  and  external 
factors  and  components  which  challenge  the  state’s  security  interests  so  that 
an effective  response by the government is  necessary.
I.  Internal  dimensions
1.  Effectiveness  o f the  governmental system
a.  The  political  and  moral  state  o f society;  conditions  for democracy.
b.  Effectiveness  o f  governmental  control  over  territorial  self-government 
and local  government.
c.  National  and local level, o f governmental support.
d.  Programmes  and activities  o f the  political  on  the  national  level.
In  Ukraine,  during  1992  and  early  1993,  when  the  influence  o f  the  state 
powers  was  quite  effective,  these  problems  were  not  view ed  as  a  matter  o f 
governmental  concern.
2.  Constitutional  order  and  constitutional  proposals  on  the  reform  o f the 
administrative  territorial structure
The  new  Ukrainian  constitution  has  not  yet  been  adopted,  indeed,  the 
procedures  for  ratifying  and  implementing  it  have  not,  as  yet,  been  agreed.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
45
Three main variants  o f an  administrative-territorial  system  have  been  put for­
ward by various  political  groups and  movements.
a. A  unitary state with some  form o f weak regional self-government.
b.  A   unitary  d ecen tra lised   state  w ith  a  la rge  d e g re e   o f   standard 
autonomous  powers for regional self-government.
c.  A   federal  state  structure  with  a  single  form  o f self-government  for  the 
regions  and an exceptional  or standard level  o f autonomy for Crimea.
3.  Federalist and  regional  autonomist movements
The  activities  o f  autonomist  movements  are  o f  considerable  significance 
in Crimea,  and  the Kharkiv,  Donbas  and Transcarpathian  regions,  but on  the 
national  level  there  is  only a weak  federalist movement which  is  represented 
only  by  a  small  group  o f  members  (representing  peripheral  regions)  in  the 
Ukrainian  parliament.
4.  Nationalist ethnic political  movements  and the ethnic vote
Since  the  Republican  Movement  o f  Crimea  was  dissolved,  there  is  no 
longer  any  purely  political  organisations  in  Ukraine  which  take  a  Russian 
nationalist line.  The  two  main  Russian  organisations  in Crimea  are  the  (polit­
ically  oriented)  Russophone  movement  and  the  (socio-cultural)  Russian 
Society  o f  Crimea.  The  Crimean  Tatar  movement  is  a  politically  mobilised 
and  potentially separatist force.
The  only  community  to  date  to  vote  as  an  ethnic  bloc  is  the  Romanian 
minority  in  the  Chernivtsi  region.  In  the  future,  however,  the  Crimean  Tatars 
may w ell vote  in this  manner.
5.  Separatist movements
F ollow ing  the  dissolution  o f  the  Republican  M ovem ent  o f   Crimea  in 
autumn  1992,  local  Russian  nationalist groups  tried  to create  a  bloc o f nation­
alist,  Communist and pro-Fascist organisations,  analogous  to  the  radical-patri­
otic  opposition  in  Moscow.  This  Communist-Republican  alliance  claims  to 
have  the  support  o f 40%  o f the  local  electorate.  Some  illegal  political  groups 
in  the  Transcarpathian  and  Chernivtsi  regions,  have  proclaimed  separatist 
ideas,  but these  organisations  do not enjoy any wide  public support.
6.  Ethnic violence  and terrorist activities
N o  such  phenomena  have  been  observed  in  Ukraine,  except  for  the 
Crimean  Tatars’  attack  on  the  Crimean  Parliament  and  some  cases  o f physi­
cal  violence  perpetrated  by  RMC  supporters  against  pro-Ukrainian  politi­
cians.  A   violent  outcome  is,  however,  possible,  in  the  case  o f  any  future 
clashes  in Crimea  between the Tatars  and the  Slavonic population.

46
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
II.  External  dimensions
1.  The  level  o f the  international  recognition  o f state  borders  and  interna­
tional security guarantees.
2.  Ethnic  claims by foreign states  and political  movements.
3.  Territorial  claims by foreign states  and political  movements.
4.  Foreign  illegal  activities.
A   number  o f  statements  have  been  issued  on  the  part  o f  Russian  and 
Romanian  politicians,  making  various  ethnic  and  territorial  claims  against 
Ukraine.  Territorial  claims  have  been  constantly  discussed  in  the  Russian 
Parliament  where  they  gained  the  support  o f the  majority  o f deputies  o f dif­
ferent  political  orientations.  In  view   o f  Ukraine’s  officially  neutral  status  and 
her total  lack  o f political  and strategic allies,  the  threat o f permanent pressure 
and sanctions  from Russia must be regarded as very serious  and  dangerous.
External  dimensions  are  comparatively  far  more  significant  in  the  current 
Ukrainian  model  o f  national  security.  Internal  and  external  implications  o f 
inter-ethnic  relations  in  Ukraine  stress  the  necessity  o f  reinforcing  national 
security  by  adopting  a  new  constitution  which  will  give  clear  definition  o f 
regional  status,  the  responsibilities  o f regional  self-government  and  the  sta­
tus  o f Crimea.  It  is  no  less  necessary  to  confirm  the  recognition  o f Ukraine’s 
frontiers with her neighbours  and to work  out mutual agreements  with  these 
countries  on the  protection  o f the  rights  o f minorities.
Obtaining  international  security  guarantees  in  the  context  o f  Ukraine’s 
long-term  commitment  to  nuclear  disarmament  is  likewise  a  very  desirable 
but less  realistic prospect. 


47
History
THE  UKRAINIAN  NAVY IN  1917-1920
Bohdan  Yakymovych
The  Navy in the  Era  of the  Central  Rada
Ukrainian  traditions  in  the  Black  Sea  Fleet  go  back  a  long  time.  For  129 
years  after  the  Pereyaslav  Treaty,1  from  1654  to  1783,  the  armed  forces  o f 
the  Hetman  state1
 2 * * included  a  Ukrainian  Cossack  fleet.  A   careful  study  o f the 
works  o f Russian  scholar,  Ye.  Tarle,  on  the  Russo-Turkish  ( ‘‘Crimean”)   War 
o f  1854-1855,  indicates  that  the  defence  o f  Sevastopol  was  conducted  by 
sailors  o f  Ukrainian  origin,  as  their  surnames  corroborate.  Moreover,  the 
commander  o f  the  city’s  defence,  Admiral  Pavlo  Nakhimov,  came  from  the 
old  Ukrainian  family  o f  the  Nakhimovychi.  Later,  in  1905,  the  Ukrainian 
sailors  Hryhoriy  Vakulenchuk  and  Opanas  Matiushenko  led  the  uprising  on 
the battleship  Potemkin.
Ukrainian  cultural  organisations,  such  as  the  “Kobzar”  society,  established 
in  Sevastopol  in  1905,  had  a  considerable  influence  in  raising  the  national 
awareness  o f the  Ukrainians  in the  fleet.  Following the  February Revolution  o f 
1917,  therefore,  Ukrainian  Sailors’  and Soldiers Councils were set up  on  many 
ships  o f the  Black  Sea  Fleet  towards  the  end  o f April.  Similar  Councils  were 
also set up within the  Sevastopol garrison  and the  naval aviation service.
This  spirit  o f  Ukrainian  revival  could  also  be  seen  in  other  fleets  o f  the 
Russian  empire.  In  the  Baltic  Fleet,  for  instance,  a  Ukrainian  naval  revolu­
tionary  staff  was  form ed  by  Senior  Lieutenant  Mykhailo  Bilynskyi  and 
Lieutenant  S.  Shramchenko.  There  was  also  a  plan  to  Ukrainise  the  com­
1 T h e  Treaty o f  Pereyaslav betw een  Ukraine  and Muscovy was signed in  1654.  Under its p ro ­
visions,  Ukraine  accepted  the  protection  o f  the  Muscovite  Tsar,  but  remained  a  separate  b od y 
politic,  preserving  its  o w n  socio-political  and ecclesiastical  order,  its  o w n  central  and  local  g o v ­
ernments,  army  and  financial  system,  and  the  right  to  carry  on  limited  diplom atic  relations 
under  the  supervision  o f  the  tsarist  government.  H ow ever,  Ukraine  became  incorporated  m ore 
and m ore  into the Muscovite state,  gradually becom ing  a vassal  state.
2  T he  Hetman  state  (1648-1764)  was  an  autonomous  Cossack  republic.  Its  head  o f  state  was
the  "Hetman”.  Hetman  derives  from  the  o ld  German  “Hoeftmann”  or  Commander-in-chief,  and
is  approxim ately equivalent to the title  o f "Hospodar”  o f  Moldavia  or  “ D oge"  o f  the  Republic  o f 
Venice.

48
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
mands  o f the  cruiser  Svitlana,  the  destroyers  Ukraina,  Haydamak and  oth­
ers,  to  raise  the  blue-and-yellow  Ukrainian  national  flag,  and  to  transfer 
these  vessels  to  the  Black  Sea.  These  plans,  however,  could  not  be  imple­
ment,  ow in g  to  the  Bolshevik  Revolution  in  October/Novem ber,  1917. 
Ukrainian  Councils  were  also  set  up  in  the  Caspian,  Siberian,  Amur,  and 
Northern Fleets.  A  very interesting proposal was  put forward  for  the  Caspian 
Fleet:  Ukraine  was  to  be  given  access  to  the  Caspian  Sea,  through  a  flotilla 
o f ships  o f the  former Caspian  Fleet,  transferred  to  Ukrainian command  and 
based  at  the  mouth  o f the  River Terek.  Negotiations  on  this  issue  were  initi­
ated  with  the  government  o f  the  Kuban  National  Republic.3  However,  for 
various  reasons,  nothing came  o f this  plan.
The  Ukrainian  Fleet in  the  Era  of the C entral  Rada
In July  1917  the  destroyer  Zavydnyi became  one  o f the  first  to  raise  the 
Ukrainian  national  flag.  By  November  1917  more  than  half  o f  the  ships  o f 
the  Black  Sea  Fleet  had  followed  her  example.  On  December  22,  1917,  the 
Central  Rada4  in  Kyiv  set  up  the  Ukrainian  General  Secretariat  o f  Naval 
Affairs,  headed  by  a  w ell-known  socialist  activist,  Dmytro  Antonovych. 
Being  a  civilian,  however,  he  proved  totally  incompetent  in  naval  matters. 
The  first piece  o f legislation  concerning  the  fleet —   the  “Provisional  law  on 
the  fleet  o f the  UNR  [Ukrainian  National  Republic5]”  —   was  enacted  by  the 
Central  Rada  on January  14,  1918.  This law proclaimed  that  the  Central  Rada 
had  assumed  control  o f the  Black  Sea  Fleet  o f the  Russian  empire.  The  fleet 
would  carry out coastal  defence  duties  and  protect Ukraine’s  merchant ship­
ping  on  the  Black  and  A zo v  Seas.  The  UNR  undertook  all  obligations  to 
maintain the  fleet and  harbour facilities.
The  establishment  o f the  Ukrainian  Navy was  opposed by  all  pro-Russian 
organisations  and  groupings.  The  Bolsheviks  w ere  particularly  vocal  in 
attacking  it.  The  situation  in  Crimea  kept  changing.  The  sailors,  bewildered 
by  the  various  propaganda  campaigns,  changed  their  “national"  views 
almost  daily:  raising  the  blue-and-yellow,  the  red,  or  black  (anarchist)  flags 
on  their  ships,  according  to  which  propagandist  had  impressed  them  most

T h e   state  which  cam e  into  being  on  February  16,  1918,  on  the  territory  o f  the  form er 
Kuban  oblast  o f   the  Russian  Empire.  W hen  the  Bolsheviks  seized   p o w e r   in  Petrograd,  the 
Kuban  organs  took  over  full  control  and  the  Legislative 
Rada
 (C ou ncil)  proclaim ed  the  Kuban 
National  Republic.
4
 T h e   Central  Rada  was  set  up  in  Kyiv  on March  17,  1917,  as  an  all-Ukrainian  representative 
body. A t the end o f  March,  Professor Mykhailo Hrushevskyi, w h o  returned to  K yiv  from  exile  in 
Russia,  becam e  its  president.  O n  April  19-21  the  Central  Rada  called  an  All-Ukrainian  National 
Congress  in  which  delegates  from   the  organisations  o f   the  w h o le   o f   Ukraine  took  part.  T h e 
Congress  elected  the  Central  Rada  as  the  standing  Ukrainian  representative  assembly.  It  was 
overthrow n by a coup  d ’état led  by  Pavlo Skoropadskyi on  April  29,  1918 (s e e  note 6).
5  T h e   Ukrainian  National  Republic  was  created  on   N ovem ber  20,  1917,  by  the  Central  Rada 
(s e e  note 4).

HISTORY
49
recently.  Finally,  Kyiv  realised  its  mistake  in  ignoring  the  strategic  impor­
tance  to  Ukraine  o f Crimea,  the  general  headquarters  o f the  Black  Sea  Fleet. 
The  Zaporizhzhya  Corps  was  assigned  to  clearing  Crimea  o f the  Bolsheviks. 
A   detachment  led  by  Colonel  Pctro  Bolbochan  was  dispatched  to  occupy 
Crimea  and take  over the  Sevastopol  naval  base.
Despite  strong  resistance  from  the  Bolsheviks,  the  battle  for  Melitopol 
began  on  April  18,  which  shortly  afterwards  fell  into  Ukrainian  hands. 
C olonel  Bolbochan’s  group  rapidly  pushed  the  Bolsheviks  beyond  the 
Syvash  fortifications.  After a  successful  night  manoeuvre,  Colonel  Zelynskyi’s 
troops  caused  panic  among  the  enem y  and  the  Second  Zaporizhzhya 
Regiment  occupied  the  enemy  trenches.  On  April  22  Dzhankoy  was  taken, 
and  on  April  25  Simferopol  was  cleared  o f  the  Bolsheviks.  The  ITordicnko 
Regiment occupied Bakhchesaray.  A  panic  began  in  Sevastopol.
F o llo w in g   this  successful  m ilitary  op eration ,  con dition s  appeared 
favourable  for  realising  the  demands  o f  the  Central  Rada  law  placing  the 
fleet  under  the  control  o f  the  Ukrainian  slate.  The  commands  o f  the  two 
largest  ships,  the  dreadnoughts  Volya  and  the  Empress  Catherine  the Great, 
agreed  on  the  election  o f a  single  command  o f the  fleet,  and  on  April  29  to 
raise  the  Ukrainian  flag  on  all  the  ships.  Those  reluctant  to  carry  out  this 
order  were  to  be  forced  to  do  so  by  the  12-inch  guns  o f  the  two  dread­
noughts.
Prom ptly  at  1(5 00  hrs  on  April  29,  1918,  the  flagship  St.  George  the 
B rin ger o f  Victories gave  the  order for the  fleet  to  raise  the  Ukrainian  flag.
At  that  time  the  Black  Sea  Fleet  consisted  o f three  subdivisions  o f battle­
ships  (8  vessels),  one  subdivision  o f cruisers  (4  vessels),  one  subdivision  o f 
hydrographical  reconnaissance  vessels  (6  vessels),  a  division  o f  destroyers 
(27  vessels),  submarines  (22  vessels),  and  support  vessels  for  various  tasks 
(5  gunboats,  6  mine-layers  and  others).  It  should  be  noted  that  both  dread­
noughts  —   the  Empress  Catherine the Great (built  in  191'O  and  Volya  0>uili 
in  1915)  —   were  modern,  powerful  ships  weighing  23,000  tons,  with  a 
speed  o f  21  knots,  and  a  crew  o f  42  officers  and  1,200  non-commissioned 
officers  and  ratings.  Their armament consisted  o f twelve  12-inch  guns,  twen­
ty  130-millimclrc  and  four  75-millimctrc  guns,  and  4  mine-laying  devices. 
The  naval  aviation  consisted  o f around 20  amphibious  aircraft.


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   ...   44


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling