Editorial board slava stetsko


Naval  F o rce s of the  H etm anate


Download 16.82 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet16/44
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi16.82 Mb.
1   ...   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   ...   44

Naval  F o rce s of the  H etm anate
After the  raising  o f the  Ukrainian  flag  on  the  ships  the  Commander o f  the 
fleet,  Rear-Admiral  Sablin,  sent  a  telegram  to  Kyiv  and  to  the  command  o f 
the  German  forces  in  Ukraine  asking  for  the  advance  on  Sevastopol  to  be 
halted.  At  that  time  the  advance  o f  Colonel  Bolbochan’s  detachment  was 
halted:  the  German  command  resolutely-  dem anded  the  return  o f   the 
Ukrainian  troops  beyond  Perckop.  Clearly,  the  Germans  w ere  primarily 
interested  in  Sevastopol  and  the  fleet,  which  was  based  there.  The  conflict 
becam e  so  acute  that  the  Germans  actually  threatened  to  disband  ihe

50
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
Ukrainian  units.  Bolbochan’s  detachment  left  Crimea  and  went  first  to 
Melitopol,  and then  on  to Oleksandrivka.
Meanwhile,  the  Commander o f the  German  forces in Crimea,  General von 
Kosch,  rep lied   that  he  had  no  com petence  to  halt  the  advance,  but 
promised  to  send  Sablin’s  appeal  to  the  German  Commander-in-Chief  in 
Ukraine,  Field Marshal  Hermann  Eichhorn.
Without waiting  for a  reply,  Rear-Admiral  Sablin,  who  had  little  idea  what 
was  going  on  in  Kyiv,  decided to  transfer some  o f the  ships  to  Novorosiysk. 
Those  that  remained  in  Sevastopol  were  placed  under  the  command  o f 
Rear-Admiral  Mykhailo  Ostrohradskyi.  At  20.00  hrs  on  April  30,  when  the 
German  artillery  had  already  taken  up  its  positions  on  the  outskirts  o f 
Sevastopol,  the  two  dreadnoughts,  Volya  and  the  Empress  Catherine  the 
Great,  together  with  15  destroyers,  left  Sevastopol.  The  following  day,  May 
1,  the  Germans  entered  the  city.  German  guards  were  posted  aboard  all  the 
ships  which  remained  under  the  command  o f  Admiral  Ostrohradskyi  (pri­
marily  older  vessels),  and  German  flags  were  raised.  The  fleet,  albeit  tem­
porarily,  found  itself in  German captivity.
Relations  between  Ostrohradskyi  (whom   Hetman  Skoropadskyi6  appoint­
ed  on  May  21  Ukraine’s  representative  in  Crimea)  and  the  German  com­
mand  became  very  tense.  Ostrohradskyi  asked  to  be  relieved  o f  his  com­
mand.  He  was  replaced  by  Rear-Admiral  Vyacheslav  Klochkovskyi,  who 
succeeded  in  establishing  a  dialogue  with  General  Kosch.  As  a  result,  the 
Germans  ceased  raising their flag on  certain vessels.
R ear-A dm iral  S a b lin ’s  squ adron,  w h ich   by  n o w   had  arrived  in 
Novorosiysk,  raised  the  Russian  naval  ensign  o f  St.  Andrew.  The  Germans 
issued  an  ultimatum  for  all  the  ships  to  return  to  Sevastopol  by  June  16 
(later extended  to June  19).  On  the  night o f June  16,  the  dreadnought  Volya, 
the  hydrographical  reconnaissance  vessel  Troyan,  and  7  destroyers  sailed 
from  Novorosiysk  to  Sevastopol.  The  remaining  vessels,  including  the  other 
dreadnought —   the  Empress Catherine the Great —   as  a  result  o f the  activi­
ties  o f  agents  o f  the  Entente  and  the  anti-Ukrainian  Bolshevik  propaganda 
campaign,  w ere  sunk  during  a  raid  on  Novorosiysk.  T w o   motives  were 
involved:  the  Bolsheviks  did  not  want  the  ships  to  becom e  Ukrainian,  and 
the  Entente  could  not allow the  ships  to  fall  into  German  hands.
When  this  part  o f the  squadron  had  returned  to  Sevastopol,  the  Germans 
rem oved  the  officers  and  hoisted  their  ow n  ensign  on  the  ships  and 
declared  them  interned.  The  Ukrainian government in  Kyiv  took  no counter­
measures  against the  German  allies,  believing  that the  issue  o f the  ships  and

Hetman  Pavlo  Skoropadskyi  seized  p ow er  with  the  support  o f  the  Germans  in  a  coup  d'etat 
which  overthrew  the  Central  Rada  (see  note  4 )  on  April  29,  1918.  T he  nam e  o f  the  Ukrainian 
National  Republic  w as'changed  to  the  Ukrainian  State.  On  the  day  o f  the  coup,  Skoropadskyi 
issued  a  manifesto  in  which  he  proclaimed  himself the  Hetman  o f  all  Ukraine.  H e   abdicated  on 
Decem ber  14,  1918,  follow in g  a  mass  uprising  against  his  regime,  handing  over  his  p ow er  to 
his  Council  o f  Ministers,  which,  in turn,  yielded  it to the  Directory (s ee  note  7).

HISTORY
51
the  fleet  in  general  would somehow  resolve  itself with  time.  The  Ministry  of 
Naval Affairs  therefore  began  drafting state  and  normative  acts  regarding  the 
development  and  functioning  o f  the  fleet,  its  emblems,  and  so  on.  Order 
No.  166/28  o f July  15,  1918,  which  ratified  a  law on  naval  uniforms,  was  fol­
low ed  on July  18  by  the  law  on  the  naval  ensign.  On  September  17  order 
No.  372/159  defined  the  pennant  for  the  naval  vessels  and  the  standards  of 
the  ambassador and envoys  o f the  Ukrainian  State.
Other  laws  and  regulations  o f that  time  included:  “Regulations  on  the  offi­
cer corps o f the  naval  medical  service”,  “Regulations on  the  naval  medical  ser­
vice”,  “Regulations  on  naval  representatives  abroad”,  “Staff  o f  harbour  pilot 
stations”,  “Staff  o f  the  corps  o f  naval  coastal  defence”,  “Regulations  on  the 
Council  o f the  Naval  Minister”,  regulations  on  various  enterprises,  belonging 
to  the  Naval  Department,  and  other  documents.  In  other  words,  preparations 
to  draft  a  “Law  on  the  fleet”  were  in  full  swing.  In  Novem ber  1918,  the 
Germans handed back  almost all  the ships to  Ukraine.  Hetman  Skoropadskyi’s 
order  o f November  11  on  the  Naval  Department  ratifying  the  order  o f battle 
introduced  a  provisional  Table  o f Organisation  for  naval  staffing.  An  order  of 
November  12,  1918,  announced  the  first  call-up  o f  recruits,  under  the  com­
m and  o f   C om m ander  L.  Shram chenko.  Th e  same  day  Rear-A dm iral 
Klochkovskyi  was  appointed  temporary  commander  o f  the  Ukrainian  Navy, 
and  Admiral  Andriy  Pokrovskyi  Minister  o f  Naval  Affairs.  At  the  end  o f 
November  1918,  the  Germans  handed  over  the  Mozyr  (Pinsk)  river  flotilla  to 
the  Ukrainian state.  Captain Illyutovych was  appointed its commander.
In  December  1918  the  Germans  left  Sevastopol  and  other  state  ports,  and 
ships  o f the  Entente  appeared  in  their place.  Despite  the  fact that the  Russian 
naval  ensign  o f St.  Andrew  had  been  raised  on  the  orders  o f Klochkovskyi, 
the  Allies  posted  guards  aboard  all  the  surface  vessels  and  began  to  divide 
them  among  themselves  as  the  spoils  o f war.  Some  o f these  ships,  including 
the  dreadnought  Volya,  were  taken by the Allies  to Constantinople.
Naval  F o rce s  Under the  D irectory
The  removal  o f  the  Hetman  and  the  establishment  o f  the  rule  o f  the 
Directory7  fundamentally changed the political situation.
A   person  o f  dubious  political  views,  political  commissar  Akymov,  was 
appointed to  the Naval  Ministry in Kyiv.  He  collected a  team  o f near-incompe­
tents,  and  set about  introducing  the  “democratic-socialist  order"  by dismissing 
highly-qualified  naval  officers.  Rear-Admiral  Ostrohradskyi,  the  deputy  minis­
ter,  could  do  nothing.  He  saw  in  Akymov’s  actions  an  attempt  to  disintegrate 
the Ministry. These actions very soon  cost the Central Rada very dearly.

T he Directory was set up  on Novem ber 14,  1918,  to lead the uprising against  Skoropadskyi.  It 
was  headed  by  Volodym yr  Vynnychenko.  Its  members  included  Symon  Petlura,  T eod or  Shvets, 
Andriy  Makarenko,  and  Opanas  Andriyevskyi.  Following  Skoropadskyi's  abdication  (s ee   note  6), 
the  Directory  re-established  the  Ukrainian  National  Republic.  Set  up  originally  as  a  revolutionary 
leadership, the Directory was transformed into the official  government o f the Republic.

52
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
Order  No.  1/696/50  “On  the  Naval  Department"  o f  December  25,  1918, 
installed  First  Lieutenant  Mykhailo  Bilynskyi  as  Naval  Minister.  He  immedi­
ately  rem oved  the  commissar  from  power.  Under  Bilynskyi’s  leadership, 
people  with  sound  knowledge,  breadth  o f outlook,  and  leadership  qualities 
began  to  do  serious  work.  In  the  course  o f a  few  weeks  laws were  adopted 
on  the  staff  o f  the  Naval  Ministry,  and  a  school  for  midshipmen,  to  be 
opened  on  October  1,  1919.  On January  25,  1919,  a  “Law  on  the  fleet”  was 
adopted  as  the  basis  o f  government  policy  in  building  the  naval  forces, 
including  naval  aviation  and  the  Marines.  A ccording  to  this  law,  the 
Ukrainian  navy was  to  consist  o f combat and support vessels  o f all  types.
This  law  provided  for the  creation  o f the  necessary system  o f communica­
tions,  a  department  o f  naval  aviation,  a  system  o f  coastal  defence,  and  the 
required  amount  o f support  vessels  for  the  fleet.  The  navy  was  to  consist  of 
800  officers  and  12,500  ratings.
The  educational  establishment  was  to  include  a  Midshipmen’s  Academy,  to 
be  opened  in  Mykolayiv,  with  courses  for  officers,  special  officer  courses  (for 
navigation  officers,  electrical  engineers,  gunnery  officers,  and  others),  special 
schools  for fleet petty officers and  ratings,  recruit training schools,  and so on.
Part six o f the law provided for the delineation  o f a  theatre  o f possible oper­
ations,  the  reconstruction  o f naval  ports  and  fortifications,  the  establishment  of 
a  harbour pilots’ service and a hydrographical expedition  o f the  Black Sea.
In  accordance  with  the  law  on  the  Naval  Department  o f January  27,  1919, 
and  order o f the  Directory  No.  57/28  o f January  25,  the  ships  under  construc­
tion  at  the  Mykolayiv  and  Kherson  shipyards,  which  were  to  become  a  part  of 
the combat  fleet,  were given  the  following  names:  to be commissioned  in  1919
—   the  light  cruisers  Bobdan Kbmelnytskyi and  Taras Shevchenko,  the  destroy­
ers  Kyiv,  hriv,  Chyhyryn,  Baluryn,  the  submarines  Shchuka,  Karas,  A .II.  22, 
A .II.  23,  and  the  submarine  mother-ship  Dnipro,  to  be  commissioned  in  1920
—   the  battleship  Sohom a  Ukraina,  the  light  cruisers  Petro  Doroshenko  and 
Pelro  Sabaydachnyi,  the  destroyers  Ivan  Vyhovskyi,  Ivan  Sirko,  ly ly p   Orlyk, 
Kosl  llordienko,  Ivan  Kotliarevskyi,  Martyn  Nebaba,  Ivan  Pidkova,  and  Petro 
Mobyla,  and the submarines A .II. 21,  A .ll. 2d,  and A//. 26.
At  the  same  time  the  recruitment  o f a  Regiment  o f Marines  was  begun  in 
Vynnytsia,  and  then  extended  to  Kolomyia.  The  idea  was  that  the  hutsuls,8 
w ho  were skilled  in  rafting  logs  down  rivers  would  be  good  human  material 
for  the  Marines.  With  the  agreement  o f  the  leaders  o f the  ZOUNR  (Western 
Provinces  o f the  Ukrainian  National  Republic9),  the  Directory  issued  credits
H  Inhabitants  o f  Ukraine's Carpathian Mountain region.
9
  O n  November  1,  1918,  after  the  disintegration  o f  the  Austro-Hungarian  F.mpire,  the  Western 
Ukrainian  National  Republic  (Z1JNR)  was proclaimed  in Galicia  and  Bukovyna.  On January 
A,
  1919, 
the  Ukrainian  National  Rada,  as the representative assembly o f  Western  Ukraine, voted to unite with 
the  Ukrainian  National  Republic (UNR: sec note 5). The act o f union was proclaimed on January  22, 
1919,  in  Kyiv  and  was  confirmed  by  the  Ukrainian  Parliament —  at  that  lime  the  Labour  Congress 
(con ven ed   on  January  23,  1919)  —   on  January  28,  1919.  The  name  o f   the  Western  Ukrainian 
National  Republic  was  changed  to  the  Western  Province  o f  the  Ukrainian  National  Republic 
(ZO U N R ). The final  integration o f the tw o states was to  be worked out by the Constituent Assembly 
o f  all  Ukraine,  with full  territorial autonomy being extended to Western Ukraine.

HISTORY
53
to  enable  West  Ukrainians,  who  had  been  serving  in  the  Austro-Hungarian 
armed  forces,  to  return  home  from  the  Adriatic.  The  recruitment  was  com­
pleted  in  Brody,  Lviv  oblast.  In June  1919  the  I  Hutsul  Regiment  o f Marines 
went into  battle  against  the  Bolshevik  forces  at  Volochyska.  A  little  later,  the 
II  Hutsul  Regiment  o f  Marines  was  formed  in  Kamyanets-Podilskyi,  and 
recruitment  for  the  III  Regiment  was  started.  These  three  regiments  formed 
the  First Division  o f Marines.
Units  o f  the  First  Division  o f  Marines,  including  the  I  Hutsul  Regiment, 
took  part  in  the  First  (1920)  and  Second  (1921)  Winter  Campaigns  o f  the 
Arm y  o f  the  Ukrainian  National  Republic  against  the  Bolsheviks.  On 
Novem ber  17,  1921,  in  the  village  o f  Mali  Mynky  near  Bazar  Lieutenant 
Commander  Mykhailo  Bilynskyi  fell  in  battle  against  the  forces  o f  Hryhoriy 
Kotovskyi  and  most  o f  the  Marines  with  him  met  the  same  fate.  The  rest 
w ere shot by  the  Bolsheviks.
The  ships,  which  the  Entente  had  taken  to  Constantinople  in  1919,  were 
forced  to  raise  the  Russian  naval  ensign  o f  St.  Andrew.  Shortly  afterwards, 
they  were  transferred  to  Sevastopol  and  placed  under  the  command  o f  the 
W hite  General  Pyotr  Wrangel,  w ho  used  them  in  the  fight  against  the 
Bolsheviks.  It was  on  board  these ships  that Wrangel’s  army (around 80,000) 
was  evacuated  in  November  1920  to  Constantinople  and  surrounding  areas, 
and  later  to  the  French  North  African  port  o f Bizerta.  Some  o f  the  ships  fell 
into  the  hands  o f the  Bolsheviks  who incorporated  them  into  their fleet.
The  ships  which  were  in  Bizerta  were  claimed  by  both  the  governments 
o f  Bolshevik  Russia  and  the  Ukrainian  National  Republic  (the  latter  was  at 
that  time  in  exile  and  demanding  its  rights  through  the  League  o f  Nations). 
However,  France  began  to  sell  some  o f  the  ships  for  scrap.  Some  o f  these 
ships  were  incorporated  in  the  French  fleet  and  were  still  sailing  under  the 
French  flag  as  late  as  the  beginning o f the  1950s.
At the  end  o f 1919  the  Mozyr (Pinsk)  flotilla  was  seized by  the  Poles,  who 
included it in  the  Polish  Pinsk  flotilla.
In  1922-1939  the  Bolsheviks  put on  trial  a  number  o f Ukrainian  naval  offi­
cers  and  ratings  who  had  taken  part  in  the  struggle  for  liberation,  accusing 
them  o f  “Petlurism”  (Ukrainian  nationalism).  The  percentage  o f  Ukrainian 
sailors  in  the  Black  Sea  Fleet  fell  sharply  in  comparison  with  the  pre-revolu­
tionary  times.  The  Bolshevik  ideological  machine  had  learnt  its  lesson  from 
the  Ukrainisation  o f the  fleet  during  the  revolution  and  began  systematically 
to staff it  with  personnel  from  the  Russian  territories.  Thus  ended  the  history 
o f the  Ukrainian  Navy  in  1917-1920. 


54
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
Literature
POEMS  FROM  KHARKIV
Stepan Dupliy
Stepan  Dupliy  is  a  physicist  working  in  the  nuclear  physics  department  of 
Kharkiv  University.  Although  in  his  covering  letter,  the  author  stated  that  he 
agreed  to  any  necessary  editorial  corrections,  the  Editors  have  decided  to  print 
them exactly as  received.
LIFE
I  have  not been full  o f my  praying  delight 
And  I  have shrunken.
What have  I  done? —  The  old  man 
Is  dispersed by hopelessness.
The  restlessness —
The  mind’s evil —
Reigns  not there.
The  nonhuman  delicacy 
Is  not the Ray.
Please,  answer!
W ho  is  there? —
The  immenseness 
O f the  morbid bondage.
Oh!  Priestess  o f dreams! —
You  are being poured  over 
From  head to foot 
By the  nightmare.
You  are  a  lover
O f the  inconsolable  and  meek
Corpses —
LIFE!

LITERATURE
55
The dawn
Has stained  my meaning 
With  napalm.
Oh!  No!
D o  not betray
The steel  o f dreams —
Oh! Yeah!
I  am  alive with Fullmoon.
The  distance  o f essence
Is shining
With the salvation
O f a  rush to the Nothingness —
The Morgue
O f the  pious
And guiltless
Strivings.
The  delight
O f the  loneliness’s  Dream —  
The wheezing moan 
O f the  exhaustedness 
O f evil —
T o  Sorrow,
T o  the  naiveness  o f Time,
T o  the  imperishableness 
And gibberish.
The  inviolable 
Soul’s  outcast —
The dawn.

56
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
RADIATION
My  air —
Is  the  blinding  flow  o f radiation.
1  gnaw  it —
And  my  life  is  wiped by X-rays.
No!
I  don’t  want to  decay  on  atoms!
Do  I  go  that way? —
W e  are  blamelessly squeezed.
The  quiet  and  calmness:
“What’s  the  matter,  don’t  be  afraid...” 
By what  do you  measure everything? 
You  cannot get  round 
The  childish  prattle 
And  trembling  o f essence 
By  the  faith  in the  degrees  o f lie.
So  w ho  is  to be  responsible?...
The  coast  o f my gibberish  is cut  up 
By  neglectfulness  o f senses.
I’ll  burn  my sinfulness to  pay  my  debts  to  the  night, 
I’ll  burn  my sinfulness  to  pay  my  debts  to the  night. 
I’ll  soften  in  the  colours  o f lines 
O f the  ihrown-away  idylls —
I’ll  forget  the  Passion  cry,
I’ll  forget  the  Passion  cry.
I’ll  carry out  ITis  words
And  take  her white-lie  kisses —
I’ll  beautify  my  crypt by  anguish,
I’ll  beautify  my  crypt by  anguish.
I’m  not  afraid  o f the  destroying  TIope,
I’ll  let out  my  moan to  them 
Before  I  find  the  final  peace,
Before  I  find  the  final  peace.
Skinned  by  Him,  all  infinities 
Are  ground
on  the  table
o f my soul’s  dream —
The  realms
o f fancy
are  lapped by vileness:
W eeping  is  an  echo  from the  unknown Abyss.

LITERATURE
57
I  dreamt o f night —
The  garden o f graves. 
T w o steps —  away 
Go  the  debts  o f my soul.
The  nimbus melted 
Extorting a  moan. 
Stand still 
Life-cyclotron!
DREAM
I  pray:  do  read 
A  moment yelling,
Do  not  dare leave 
Concealing  your face.
Please  flood with  Dream 
The stagnated Meaning 
To burn  to  ashes 
For Fate’s  encore.
Forgive  my wrecking 
And  failures,  soul selling.
Their’s  is  the  delirium —
Mine  is Work,  Home,  Morgue.
I’ve  stonily awoken —
A  ray  is  gliding
O ff the  bottom  o f madness:
I’ll  keep the  coup  inside  me.
Naivete  gnaws,  hurts,  revenges.
My Sin  is  dethroned —  the  fancy-realm AIDS.
Crying.  I  stand by the  window —
Everywhere  there  is  that  cruel silence  o f mine.
Cri  de  coeur melts  into the  night,
Extorting  my  daughter-hope.
Time  revenges  for  my lying  role —
I  know it in  my heart,  but how to burn  my failures? 
The  phone  has been  done  to  death —
With my  dearest I’ve become  a widower.
Do  not beat me  with  the  past,  I’m kissing the  ground. 
What on earth shall  I  do?  Get cool  for good?
The  gibberish  glides  to  the  depths  o f my soul.
H ow  not to waste? —  Write  to write yourself out...

58
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
SUPERMANIFOLD
Doom  is  covered with  the snow o f idylls —
Whether to save  my Light
Or to clothe up
My latest and inner worries
In  the  mud  o f etceteras?
No!
Fylfot o f dreams 
Unspoken  and unuttered,
Caresses —
Poisoned by the  mind.
Life’s
Supermanifold
Lies
In  Gibberish...

59
N ew s  From  Ukraine
U kraine C h id e s Y e ltsin   Over 
R u ss ia ’s  P o lice   Role
K Y IV   —   R e sp o n d in g   to  Boris 
Yeltsin’s  appeal  for a  United  Nations 
mandate  to  act  as  a  guarantor  o f 
peace  in  the  former  USSR,  Ukrainian 
officials  attacked  the  Russian  presi­
dent  on  Monday,  March  1,  for  trying 
to  becom e  the  policeman  over  other 
countries.
“This  w ou ld  mean  dictatorship, 
interference  in  internal  affairs  and  a 
threat  to  the sovereignty  and  territor­
ial  integrity  o f  Ukraine”,  the  Foreign 
Ministry o f Ukraine said.
Yeltsin  said  on  Sunday,  February 
28,  that Russia should be  granted spe­
cial powers  on the  territory o f the  for­
mer  Soviet  Union  to  stop  ethnic  con­
flicts.  The  Ukrainian  Foreign  Ministry 
said  this  would  be  a  crude  violation 
o f  all  existing  international  laws.  “No 
one  in  Ukraine  made  such  a  request 
o f the Russian president”,  it said.
M ykola  M ykhailychenko,  c h ie f 
political  adviser  to  President  Leonid 
Kravchuk,  said  earlier  Kyiv  w ould 
never  recognise  Ukrainian  territory 
as  a  sphere  o f Russian  special  inter­
est.  “W e  will  never  agree  to  Russia 
o n c e   again   b e c o m in g   an  e ld e r  
brother or  any  other kind o f brother. 
W e  want  relations  o f  equality”,  he 
added.
Mykhailychenko  said  he  saw  the 
appeal  as  a  Russian  attempt  to  win
international  en dorsem ent  for  its 
long-standing  drive  for  dominance 
in  the  region  o f  the  former  Soviet 
Union.
Yeltsin  insists  he  has  no  ambitions 
to  reassert  Kremlin  rule  over  the  for­
mer  Soviet  republics,  but  sees  any 
instability  among  Russia’s  neighbours 
as  a  great  threat  to  Russia.  Borders 
are  largely  open  and  the  flo w   o f 
refugees  and  guns  from  numerous 
conflict  areas  is  difficult  to  control. 
T h e  Transcaucasian  rep u b lic  o f 
Georgia  last  month  accused  Russian 
troops  on  its  territory  o f interfering  in 
civil  conflict there  and  called  for their 
withdrawal.  In  his  speech  Yeltsin  did 
not say  what  powers  he  sought  from 
the  international  comm unity.  His 
brief  appeal  may  be  v ie w e d   more 
sym path etically  in  C entral  Asian 
states such as Kazakhstan,  Uzbekistan 
and  Tajikistan.  Russian  troops  are 
currently  playing  a  peace-keeping 
role  in  Tajikistan,  w hich  has  been 
torn  by  clan  and  political  conflict  for 
a year.
In  Budapest,  Kravchuk  suggested 
on  Friday,  February  26,  that  Eastern 
Europe  needed  new  security  solu­
tions  to  cope  with  the  vacuum  left 
by the  Soviet Union’s  collapse.
“W e  need  to  create  a  region  o f 
security in  East Europe...  in  a  broad­
er  sen se” ,  Kravchuk  told   a  news 
conference  after  holding  talks  with
1   ...   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   ...   44


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling