Editorial board slava stetsko


Download 16.82 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet23/44
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi16.82 Mb.
1   ...   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   ...   44

7
on  the  style  of  the  Nuremberg  trials.  But  such  a  trial  appears  to  be  a  real 
and  in esca p a b le  ev en t.  T h e  first  w arning  b ell  w as  so u n d ed   by  the 
Resolution  of  the  Security  Council  of  the  UN  regarding  Russian  pretensions 
to  Ukrainian  Sevastopil,  while  the  establishment  of an  influential  tribunal  on 
the  atrocities  of the  aggressors  in  Yugoslavia  means  that  it  is  already  knock­
ing  at  the  door.  So  far  there  is  no  sign  that  official  Russia  has  heard  these 
historical  signals  o f fate.  We  have  seen  no  signs  of repentance  for  the  reduc­
tion  by  half  of  the  Ukrainian  nation  over  the  last  75  years.  But  we  would 
wish  our  northern  neighbours  to  pay  heed  to  our  warning;  the  Ukrainian 
nation  retains  the  right  to  demand  that  Moscow  bear  the  responsibility,  in 
particular  for  the  famine  of  1933.  The  lime  is  coming,  and  8  or  12  million 
witnesses,  two  or  three  times  more  than  the  number  of  Ukrainians  who  fell 
in  World  War  II,  will  rise  up  from  their graves  in  every  Ukrainian  village  and 
demand  that  there  be  no  Statute  of  Limitations  for  their  murder,  in  accor­
dance  with  international  law.
At  a  conference  organised  by  our  Embassy  in  Moscow  in  the  spring  of 
this  year,  most  o f  the  Russian  participants  voiced  the  opinion  that  the 
Famine  did  not  select  its  victims  according  to  genotype;  Lhat  in  the  face  of 
the  famine  and  Stalin  all  were  equal.  There  was  only  one  person,  Serhiy 
Adamovich  Kovalyov,5  the  former dissident  and current  head  o f the  commis­
sion  of Human  Rights  of the  ill-famed  Russian  Parliament,  found  the  courage 
to  state  that  the  Russians  must  say  to  the  Ukrainians:  “Forgive  us!”.  In  these 
words  there  is  a  sound  of hope. 

5  This  is  nol  the  first  time  that  Kovalyov  has  stood  up  for  the  rights  of  the  non-Russian  peo­
ples  of  the  USSR.  In  the  1970s,  he  publicly  gave  his  support  to  the  underground  "Chronicle  of 
the  Lithuanian  Catholic  Church"  for  which  he received  a 7-year  prison  sentence.

8
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
1 9 3 3   —   A  V IE W   FR O M   L O N D O N
During  the  early  1930s,  ihc  Catholic  weekly  The  Tablet,  kept  up  an 
unremitting  battle  against  the  Soviet  Union  (usually  referred  to  as  Russia), 
advocating  a  trade  boycott,, in  particular  of  foodstuffs.  The  T ablet’s  primary 
motive  for  the  campaign  was  religious —   Moscow  had,  at  this  time,  declared 
a  five  year  plan  for  the  extirpation  of religion.  But  during  the  course  o f  1932 
and  1933,  references  to  the  famine  began  to  make  their  appearances  in  its 
pages.  A  boycott  o f  “Russian"  produce  was  now  advocated,  not  only  in 
protest  against  the  Soviet  Union’s  blatant  disregard  of  what  are  now  called 
Human  Rights,  but  also  because  the  food  being  offered  to  Britain  was  taken 
from  the  starving.
The  editors  of  'the  'Tablet  do  not  seem  to  have  grasped  that  what  was 
going  on  in  Ukraine  was  an  engineered  famine.  They  assume  rather  that  it 
was  caused  by  a  gigantic  planning  blunder.
“More  men,  women  and  children  have  lately  starved  to  death  in  Russia 
(sic)
  than  there  are  in  all  Portugal",  The  Tablet wrote  on  September  16,  1933. 
The  worst  of  it  is  that  the  Famine  of  1933  is  no  inscrutable  Act  of God,  but  a 
hideous  and  blatant  Act  of  Man.  Rather  than  admit  that  their  policies  were 
wrong,  the  Moscow  despots  have  calmly  allowed  millions  of  their  lellow- 
Russians  (sic) to  die  the  most  ghastly  of deaths”.
The  'Tablet
  was,  and  indeed,  still  is  a  sober  journal,  not  given  to  colourful 
writing  or  horror stories.  Indeed,  in  the  note  just  cited,  it  slates  that  the  latest 
reports  from  the  “Ukrainian  Bureau”  are  so  horrifying  that  the  editors  cannot 
take  the  responsibility  of  publishing  them  without  independent  verification! 
But  however  sober  the  writing,  the  sheer  horror  of  the  reportage  comes 
through.  In  early  spring,  1933,  it  evokes  a  haunting  image  of  the  bodies  of 
Ukrainians  “whose  names  arc  known  only  to  God”,  shot  by  border  guards 
as  they  tried  to  escape  over  the  river-ice  to  Romania,  and  now  floating 
downstream  in  the  spring  floods.  (The  use  of  the  formula  employed  on 
World  War  I  war-graves  of  those  too  maimed  to  be  identifiable  must  have 
been  particularly  striking  in  1933).  And  on  1  July,  th e  Tablet  published  the 
words  of the  some  of the  victims  of the  famine  themselves.
The  Fditors  of  the  day  appear  to  have  been  somewhat  apprehensive  of 
their  readers'  reactions.  The  leading  article  is  entitled  “Russia  once  more”, 
and  is  largeltcd  at  readers  who  have  expressed  their  weariness  with  the 
theme.
“If  the  reader  who  tells  us  that  she  has  ‘got  a  bit  tired  o f  reading  about 
Russia’  were  the  only  person  to  have  said  so,  a  plain  reply  through  the  post 
would  meet  her  case”,  the  editorial  begins.  “We  are  grieved  to  say,  however, 
that  there  arc  millions  of  persons  in  Great  Britain  to  whom  ihe  most  dread­

60th ANNIVERSARY OF THE  1932-33  FAMINE
9
ful  messages  from  starving  Russia  are  merely  something  to  read  and  there­
fore  something  which  has  becom e  stale.
We  should  indeed  be  despicable  creatures  if  the  many  articles  and  notes 
on  Russia  which  we  have  been  publishing  nearly  every  week  for years  were 
no  more  than  news-m ongering  or  a  journalistic  exploitation  o f  human 
wrongs  and  miseries.  If Russia  under the  Soviets  were  no  more  than  a  ‘stunt’ 
for  The  Tablet,  we  too  should  have  'got  a  bit  tired’  of  the  topic  long  before 
this.  There  is  no  lack,  week  by  week,  of interesting  and  fresh  and  often  con­
genial  matter  for  Catholic  Editors  to  write  about;  and  such  writing  would  be 
far  easier  than  our  Russian  articles,  in  which  there  would  be  tiresome  repeti­
tions  if  we  did  not  lavish  pains  upon  them.  We  have  spoken  literally  hun­
dreds  of times  against  the  Muscovites,  simply  because  we  regard  their  tyran­
ny  as  the  most  gigantic  in  history  and  their  militant  atheism  as  the  worst 
affront  ever  offered  by  His  creatures  to  the  Creator,  and  we  shall  go  on 
speaking,  whether  we  bore  the  public  or  not,  until  the  tyrants  are  unhorsed 
and  their  blasphemies  are  ended...
....[Wle  re-affirm  our  oft-made  declaration  that  Muscovite  rule  is  a  curse 
not  only  to  Christianity  but  to  our  common  civilisation.  For  proof  of  this 
indictment,  we  need  do  no  more  today  than  point  to  the  present state  of the 
Russian  people,  after  a  decade  and  a  half of  Soviet  administration.  Overleaf 
will  be  found  an  account  of the  heartrending  ordeal  of the  millions  who  are 
doomed  to  live  wretchedly  and  die  prematurely  under  Moscow’s  misrule.  If 
anyone  who  has  ‘got  a  bit  tired  of  reading  about  Russia’  can  read  right 
through  our  contributor’s  fully  authenticated  story  without  his  boredom  giv­
ing  place  to  indignation,  we  shall  not envy  him  his  heart  of stone...”.
The  article  so  introduced  is  from  a  certain  G.M.  Godden,  and  is  partly 
based  on  material  published  in  what  he  describes  as  “a  non-political 
German  magazine  (Allg.  Ev.  Luth.  K irchenzeitung,  No,
15,  14.4.33)”. 
It  hardly 
requires  a  knowledge  of  German  to  identify  this  as  a  Lutheran  publication 
—   and  in  those  pre-ecumenical  days,  the  very  fact  that  The  Tablet  dared  to 
reproduce  material  of  Lutheran  provenance,  is  itself evidence  of  the  impor­
tance  placed  by  the  editors  on  authenticating  their  m aterial.  For  the 
K irch en zeitu n g
  material  —   eyewitness  accounts  from  a  visitor  recently 
returned  from  the  Soviet  Union  —   are  only  there  to  substantiate  the  princi­
pal  material  —   the  letters  of the  starving.
These  letters,  we  are  told,  have  been  edited  to  protect  the  writers  from 
even  greater  suffering,  so  that  names  and  places  of  origin  are  omitted.  We 
are  assured  that  “(e)vidence  of  the  b on a fid e s   of  the  transmission  is  in  the 
hands  of  'lbe  Tablet’,  but  has  almost  certainly  not  survived  the  past  60  years. 
Some  letters  are  clearly  come  from  those  deported  as  “Kulaks”,  others 
appear  to  come  from  people  still  in  their  home  villages  but  trapped  by  the 
famine.  The  identification  numbers  attached  to  the  documents  by  those  who 
transmitted  them  suggest  something  of the  size  of the  original  package.

10
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
1 4 9 0
What shall  I  tell  you  about  our life  in  the  encampment? It  is  an  unbroken  round 
of  misery.  When  we  arrived,  all  our  money  was  taken  from  us.  If  we  had 
money we  could buy  tickets  and  try  to  escape.  We  have,  for  doing the  full  out­
put  of work,  a  little  over  one  pound  of bread  in  the  morning  and  some  groats; 
weak  soup  at  midday;  and  water  for  tea.  Every  month  we  get  less  than  one 
pound  of sugar.  [The  editors  have  presumably  converted  the  original  units  to 
those  familiar  to  their  British  readers].  Those  who  cannot  reach  the  standard  of 
work get  less  food.  All  dead  horses  are  eaten.  As  most  of the  Kulaks  are  elderly 
men  it  is  harder  for  them.  Young  criminals,  with  whom  we  are  placed,  cannot 
help  stealing.  They  have  stolen  from  me  all  the  little  I  have,  except  the  shoes  I 
stand  up  in  and  my  lapli  (bast  shoes).  We  are  given  old  worn  clothes.  We  lie 
close  together  on  a  wooden  staging,  in  our  bitterly  cold  barracks,  which  are 
infested  with  lice  and  bugs.  We  get  wet  through  and  have  nowhere  to  dry  our 
clothes.  A guard always accompanies us when we  are  put to  “general work”.
1475.  M arch  19,1933-
We  were  unloaded  from  a  wagon  on  the  open  steppe  (Siberia).  At  first  we 
had  no  shelter  from  rain  and  snow,  and  fifty  people  were  lodged  in  a  hovel 
fourteen  yards  long  by  six  yards  wide.  Typhus  and  smallpox  soon  broke 
out.  Our  food  is  decreased  constantly.
1492. M arch 26,  1933
We  don’t  believe  we  shall  ever  again  have  enough  to  eat;  our  faces  and  feet 
are  swelling  from  hunger.  Out  of  the  fifty-one  persons  sent  here  (W est 
Siberia)  twenty-three  have  died.
1495. M arch 4,  1933
You  cannot  imagine  how  the  people  hunger.  All  who  do  not  receive  food 
parcels  from  abroad  die.
1474. March  15,  1933,
jMy  husband  died  from  hunger  two  weeks  ago;  my  two  children  are  already 
swollen  with  hunger;  we  shall  soon  follow  him.
1475. M arch  10,  1933-
My  father  died  on  Friday,  and  the  baby  is  now  dead.  The  little  one  was  only 
skin  and bones.  We  shall  bury them  together...  We  have just  come  back,  moth­
er  is  so  weak  that she  fell  off the  wagon  in  which  was  the  coffin.  Mother  is  left 
with  five  children;  we  are  all  so  swollen  with  hunger  that  we  can  scarcely  see 
out of our  eyes.  Father  and  the  little  one  will  not suffer  from  hunger  any more.

60th  ANNIVERSARY OF THE  1932-33 FAMINE
11
1476. M arch 27,  1933.
Day  by  day  the  distress  becomes  greater,  many  of  my  parishioners  will  die, 
before  long,  from  hunger;  two  hundred  families  in  my  parish  have  no  hope 
of escaping  death  unless  help  is  sent.
1477.  M arch  12,  1933
.
Now  that  the  snow  is  melting,  many  corpses  are  appearing  which  the  snow 
had  covered.
1482.  April,  1933-
Men
  have  becom e  like  hungry  beasts.
1478.  April  12,  1933-
Men  are  eating  dead  beasts;  they  are  also eating  human  bodies.
1479. April  11,  1933-
The  entrails,  liver  and  lungs  are  removed  from  bodies  of the  dead;  from  those 
that  are  not  too  emaciated  the  flesh  is  taken.  Dead  animals  are  also eaten.
1571.  April  18,  1933-
My  husband  died  of hunger  on  April  4;  he  cried  for  food  until  he  was  dead. 
1  have  eight  children,  who  are  already  dying.
1572. April 25,  1933.
Most  of  the  people,  even  those  working  on  the  collective  farms,  have  no 
bread;  it  is  all  delivered  up,  we  are  compelled  to  give  it.  Those  who  refuse 
to  give  up  com  [in  the  British  sense  of  all  cereal  crops  and,  in  particular, 
wheat]  are  sentenced  to  imprisonment.  Many  men  are  dying  here.  Many  are 
all  swollen;  then  they  die  of hunger.
1520,  April 23,  1933.
We  were  all  swollen  with  hunger,  and  had  nothing  more  to  eat,  Then  my 
son  found  some  potatoes  left  in  the  ground  from  the  autumn,  all  frost  bitten 
and  soft;  they  saved  us.
1559. April 28-29,  1933.
My  husband  is  swollen  and  has  lost  all  hope  of  living;  our  strength  is  at  an 
end...  Many  men  are  dying,  here,  of hunger.

12
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
1529. A pril 26-27,  1933-
We  are  all  so  weak  and  swollen  that  we  can  hardly  move.  We  have  six 
ounces  of bread  per  day.  Six  of our  family  have  died  of'hunger...  This  week 
two  died  at  the  Co-op.  They  were  standing  in  the  Bread  Queue,  and  fell 
down,  and  were  found  to  be  dead.
During  the  past  few  decades,  stories  of  the  Gulag  and  other  horrors  of 
the  Soviet  system  have  become  commonplace  to  Western  readers.  In  1933, 
however,  this  litany  of suffering  would  have  had  an  audience  not yet  blunt­
ed  by  familiarity.
To  validate  the  above  picture,  Mr.  Godden  refers  on ce  more  to  the 
K irch en zeitu n g ,
  and  then  to  a  recent  report  from  a  certain  Mlonsieurj 
Sabline.  “The  people,  in  what  was  once  the  grain-store  of Europe,  are  starv­
ing”,  Godden  notes,  while  “Mlonsieurj  Litvinov  [USSR  Commissar  for  Foreign 
Affairs]  as  the  effrontery  to  suggest  to  the  Economic  Conference  now  sitting 
in  London  that  vast  sums  can  be  paid  by  the  Soviet  Government  to  foreign 
countries  in  order  to  secure  potential  war  material,  raw  products  and 
machinery,  nay,  worse,  large  quantities  of  food  are  being  exported  from 
Russia  and  sold  throughout  the  world.  ‘Will  no  one  save  us  from  death?’  cry 
the  starving”.
In  G odden’s  opinion,  “[TJhe  first  immediate  response  to  that  appeal 
should  be  a  boycott  of  all  Russian  food-stuffs,  on  sale,  in  those  happier 
lands  where  mass-starvation  is  unknown.  Such  a  boycott  would  influence 
the  callous  Soviet  rulers,  to  whom  human  life  and  human  misery  are  as 
nothing,  and  money  to  carry  out  their  grandiose  schemes  of  a  mechanized 
Russia  is  everything”.
And  now,  Godden  notes,  there  is  a  new  threat,  as  the  harvest  o f  1933 
ripens,  the  peasants  are  making  “new  efforts...  to  ward  off death  from  them­
selves  and  their  children.  Ears  of  grain  are  being  cut  from  the  standing 
crops;  and  the  hungry  men  and  women,  driven  to  this  expedient,  are 
becoming  known  as  ‘grain-barbers’.  Although  the  grain  is  not  yet  ripe,  ‘bar- 
bering’  has  already  begun  in  many  districts.  Against  these  ‘grain  barbers’  the 
Soviet  Governm ent  has  proclaimed  a  new  campaign.  Patrols  of  young 
Communists,  with  dogs,  are  sent  out  to  hunt  down  the  starving  people.  Two 
years  ago  ( T ablet,  August  22,  1931),  the  Christians  in  the  Soviet  Union 
declared:  ‘We  are  all  like  hunted  game’.  Today,  ten  thousand  ‘selected  Town 
Communists’  with  dogs,  have  been  sent  out  to  keep  the  starving  peasants 
from  the  ripening  corn  which  they  themselves  have  planted...". 


13
C u rren t A ffairs
U K R A IN E   A N D   TH E   PROBLEM S  OF 
NUCLEAR  W EAPO NS
Lt.-Colonel Anatoliy Hlushchenko
Over  the  last  two  years  the  question  of  the  deployment  o f  nuclear  mis­
siles  in  Ukraine  has  constantly  attracted  the  attention  of  politicians,  econo­
mists,  the  military,  and  journalists.  This  is  not  surprising,  since  there  are  two 
diametrically  opposed  views  on  the  matter.  One  side  sees  these  weapons  as 
a  guarantee  of its  security,  while  the  other perceives  in  these  weapons  a  cer­
tain  threat.  Nevertheless,  a  solution  to  the  problem  will  surely  be  found  pro­
vided  that  both  sides  manage  to  understand  each  other’s  point  o f view,  and 
are  prepared  to  act  in  a  constructive  manner,  on  the  basis  of  their  common 
interests.
1.  D isarm am ent  and  independence
The  first  step  should  be  an  objective  analysis  of  the  current  situation 
regarding  nuclear  missiles  in  Ukraine.  Here,  the  starting  point  must  be 
Ukraine’s  declaration  of  independence.  For,  paradoxically,  a  number  of  for­
eign  politicians  see  this  event  as  a  set-back  to  the  international  process  of 
nuclear disarmament.
Those  who  think  this  way  should be  reminded  of the  following  facts.  The 
nuclear  arms  reduction  process  can  be  conventionally  divided  into  three 
phases.  The  first  is  the  1960s,  when  a  number  of  treaties  were  signed  on 
non-proliferation  and  partial  test-bans.  The  second  —   the  1970s  -  was 
marked  by  strategic  arms  limitation  treaties.  (We  may  note  that,  today,  inde­
pendent  Ukraine  is  complying with  all  the  terms  o f these  treaties,  unlike  cer­
tain  other  countries,  which  to  date  have  not  renounced  nuclear  testing,  and 
which  are  the  source  of  a  leakage  of  technological  information  concerning 
nuclear weapons  production).
Lt.-Colonel  Anatoliy  Hlushchenko  graduated  from  the  Kharkiv  Military  Academy  for  Rocket 
Forces  in  1969.
Subsequently,  he  entered  the  Lenin  Military-Political  Academy,  following  which  he  worked 
as  a  political  officer  at  divisional  and  army  level  in  Ukraine.  In  1991  he  was  transferred  to  the 
reserve with  the rank  of Lt.-Colonel.

14
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
The  greatest  interest  in  nuclear  disarmament,  however,  came  in  the  third 
phase  —   the  end  of  the  1980s  and  the  beginning  of  the  1990s.  In  1987  a 
treaty  was  signed  on  the  elimination  of medium-range  and  short-range  mis­
siles,  followed,  in  July  1991,  by  a  treaty  on  the  reduction  and  limitation  of 
strategic  forces.  If we  track  the  course  of the  strategic  forces  limitation  talks, 
then  we  see  at  on ce  that  the  stum bling-block  was  always  what  were 
referred  to  as  the  “heavy  missiles”  based  in  Ukraine.  However,  in  the  sum­
mer  o f 1991  the  situation  changed  drastically,  since  the  military  plants  which 
produced  this  class  of  missiles  were  situated  in  what  now  becam e  the  terri­
tory  of independent  Ukraine.
In  this  situation  the  former  political  and  military  leadership  of  the  USSR 
was  obliged  to  reach  a  compromise  with  the  USA  and  agree  to  the  reduction 
o f nuclear  arms.  Thus,  willy-nilly,  one  has  to  recognise  that  the  reduction  of 
these  weapons  of  mass  destruction  became  possible  because  Ukraine  had 
becom e  an  independent state.
Tracking  Ukraine's  over-all  implementation  of the  treaties  of  1987  and  1991 
also  reveals  some  interesting  facts.  According  to  these  treaties,  the  general 
reduction  of strategic  rocket  forces  should  have  been  around  50  per  cent,  as 
senior  military  officials  have  stated  on  a  number  of occasions.  What is  the  situ­
ation  today? Firstly,  we  may  note  that  during  this  period  (in  addition  to  tactical 
nuclear  missiles)  4  out  of 6  of  the  rocket  divisions  stationed  in  Ukraine  have 
been  cut,  and  more  than  l60  strategic  missiles  targeted  on  Europe  have  been 
decommissioned.  Therefore  Ukraine  today  is  the  only  state  in  the  world  which 
has  reduced  her strategic  rocket  forces  by  more  than  50  per cent in  reality,  and 
not  merely  in  words.  A  legal  point  arises  here:  would  it  not  be  more  equitable 
for  other states,  instead  o f urging  Ukraine  to  total  disarmament,  to  emulate  her 
by  also  reducing  their  rocket forces  in the  same  proportion?
Secondly,  since  Ukraine  has  totally  eliminated  one  class  of missiles  which 
were  targeted  against  European  cities,  her  leaders  should  declare  this  pub­
licly  to  the  peoples  of  Europe.  Certainly  this  will  by  no  means  satisfy  the 
countries  of Europe,  since  one  may  confidently  assume  that  the  targets  pro­
grammed  into  the  missiles  formerly  deployed  in  Ukraine,  have  now  been 
plotted  into  the  trajectories  o f  the  missiles  deployed  in  Russia.  But  this  is  a 
different  issue,  which,  perhaps,  the  countries  of  Europe  should  take  up  not 
with  Ukraine,  but with  Russia.
One  cannot  of  course  discount  the  problem  of  the  rest  of  the  missiles  in 
Ukraine.  Today  there  remain  120  SS-19s  (with  6  warheads  apiece)  and  56  SS- 
24s  (with  10  warheads  apiece).  Naturally,  one  can  and,  indeed,  should  under­
stand  the  concern  o f the  USA  that  in  Ukraine  there  are  missiles  which  could 
be  launched  against  it.  Furthermore,  anyone  who  is  involved  in  thèse  matters 
is  well  aware  that it is  by  no  means  Ukraine  which would take  the  decision  to 
launch  them.  The  chain  of command  from  these  missile  bases  does  not  lead 
back  to  some  mythical  “strategic  forces’  unified  command”,  under  the  joint 
control  of  the  Presidents  of  Ukraine  and  Russia,  but  to  the  command  posts 
and general  headquarters  of the  strategic  rocket forces  of Russia.
1   ...   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   ...   44


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling