Editorial board slava stetsko


Download 16.82 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet36/44
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi16.82 Mb.
1   ...   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   ...   44

Free economic zones
To  provide  more  incentives  for  foreign  investors  to  expand  their  activities 
in  the  country  in  October  1992  the  Supreme  Council  of  Ukraine  passed  a 
Law  on  Free  Econom ic  Zones.8  This  supplem ents  the  Law  on  Foreign 
Investments  by  making  provision  for  the  creation  o f  zones  where  foreign 
capital  may  be  granted  additional  benefits  as  regards  taxation,  customs,  sim­
plified  entry  procedures  into  the  zone,  etc.  in  exchange  for  an  increase  in 
the  introduction  of  high  quality  goods  and  services,  introduction  of  new 
technologies,  improvement  of  managerial  skills,  acceleration  o f  socio-eco­
nomic development,  etc.
The  law  lays  down  basic  rules  for  the  creation,  functioning  and  liquida- 
tio a  o f  free  economic  zones.  Regarding  the  status,  terms  and  territory  o f  a 
given  special  economic  zone,  these  are  to  be  determined  by  separate  laws 
to  be  enacted  by  the  Supreme  Council  of Ukraine  whenever  the  question  of 
establishing  such  a  zone  is  raised  (Art.  2).  This  flexible  approach  makes  pos­
sible  the  establishment  o f various  types  of such  zones  having  different  func­
tional  characteristics,  and  hence  requiring  certain  variations  in  their  legal  set­
ups  in  accordance  with  the  purposes  for  which  they  are  established  and  the 
specific  conditions  in  the  area  concerned.
The  procedure  for  setting  up  a  free  economic  zone  consists  o f  several 
stages.  The  initiative  in  this  respect  may  stem  from  the  President,  the 
Cabinet  of Ministers,  local  councils  of people’s  deputies,  local  state  adminis­
tration.  The  project  must  first  be  considered  by  the  Cabinet  o f  Ministers
8  Law  on  Free  Economic  Zones,  13  October  1992,  in  Russia  a n d   Com m onw ealth  Business 
Law Report,
  8  February  1993.

18
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
within  the  specified  time-span  (60  days  from  the  time  it  receives  the  propos­
al).  It  is  submitted  to  the  Supreme  Council  (Parliament)  for  a  final  decision. 
The  same  applies  to  any subsequent  proposals  for  changing  the  status  o f the 
zone  (Art.  5).  The  package  of documents  governing  the  setting  up  o f a  free 
econom ic  zone  includes  the  decision  (the  written  consent  in  the  case  when 
the  initiative  com es  from  the  President  o f  U kraine  or  the  Cabinet  of 
Ministers)  o f  the  local  council  o f  people’s  deputies  and  local  state  adminis­
tration,  the  draft  regulations  governing  the  status  and  the  system  of adminis­
tration  o f the  zone,  a  description  of  its  boundaries,  a  feasibility  study  of the 
expediency  o f  setting  up  the  zone  and  its  future  operation,  and  a  draft  of 
the  law setting  it up  (Art.  6).
Particular  attention  is  paid  by  the  law  to  the  feasibility  study  the  main  part 
o f which  is  listed  in  Art.  7.
The  legal  regime  of  each  zone  is  assumed  to  be  based  on  two  compo­
nents  which  supplement  each  other:  the  legal  rules  determining  the  status  of 
the  zone  and  the  organisational  mechanism  for  administering  its  operation. 
As  far  as  the  latter  is  concerned  the  law  enumerates  several  organs  of 
administration  o f  the  free  econom ic  zone  as  well  as  defining  their  basic 
functions  and  sphere  of interaction.
The  core  of the  organisational  mechanism  of a  free  econom ic  zone  is  the 
local  councils  o f people’s  deputies  and  local  state  administration  on  the  one 
hand,  and  the  organ  of  economic  development  and  administration  of  the 
free  economic  zone  on  the  other.  The  latter  is  to  be  established  with  the 
participation  of the  subjects  of economic  activity  of Ukraine  and  foreign  sub­
jects  of such  activity.
The  functions  and  authority  of the  local  councils  o f people’s  deputies  and 
the  local  state  administration  include  the  presentation  of proposals  for  possi­
ble  changes  in  the  status  of  the  zone,  participation  in  resolving  the  legal, 
financial,  and  social  problems  of  Ukrainian  citizens  living  within  the  zone, 
concluding  with  the  administration  of  the  zone  master  agreements  on  the 
transfer  of  plots  of  land,  facilities  located  within  the  zone  and  also  natural 
resources.  The  other  powers  of  the  local  councils  of  people’s  deputies  and 
local  state  administration  are  to  be  defined  by  the  legal  instrument  when  the 
free  economic  zone  is  established.
The  local  councils  of  people’s  deputies  and  the  local  state  administration 
have  the  right  to  have  their  representatives  in  the  decision-making  levels  of 
the  administrative  body  of the  zone.
Apart  from  the  functions  and  authority  specified  in  the  law  creating  the 
zone,  the  organ  of economic  development  and  administration  of a  free  eco­
nomic  zone  possesses  mainly  operational  powers.  It  alone  is  competent  to 
define  the  future  directions  of development  of the  zone;  to  run  and  develop 
a  common  infrastructure;  organise  international  tenders  to  bring  in  new 
industries;  allocate  plots  o f  land,  facilities  and  the  use  o f  natural  resources; 
issue  licenses  for  the  construction  of new  facilities,  and  register  the  subjects 
o f econom ic  activities  and  the  investments  made  in  the  zone.
The  law  also  allows  a  citizen  of another  country  working  on  a  fixed-term 
contract  to  be  the  executive  director  of the  zone’s  administrative  body.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
19
The  local  councils  of  people’s  deputies  and  local  state  administration  and 
also  the  organ  of economic  development  of  the  zone  carry  out  their  various 
activities  independently of other bodies  of the  state  administration  of Ukraine.
The  involvement  of other organs  in  the  process  of regulating  the  functioning 
of the  zone  is  described  in  the  basic  law  in somewhat general  terms.  Thus,  the 
organs  of  the  state  executive  power  in  Ukraine  exercising  state  regulation  of 
the  activities  of  the  zone  are  to  supervise  the  compliance  of  the  zone’s  legal 
regime  with  the  requirements  of the  legislature  in  Ukraine.  The judicial,  arbitra- 
tional  and  other  law  enforcement  authorities  and  also  the  state  agencies  moni­
toring  compliance  with  environmental,  public  health  and  other  regulations  are 
to  be  guided  by  the  Ukrainian  legislation  currently  in  force  with  such  excep­
tions  as  are specified  in the  law  for the economic zone  in  question  (Art.  9).
The  law  gives  a  general  outline  of the  specific  conditions  to  be  created  for 
subjects  of economic  activities  in  the  zone  and stipulates  their  basic  guarantees. 
Among the  former  it mentions  the  creation  of regulations  covering  a  preferential 
mode  and  level  of taxation,  specific  financial  conditions  relating  to  hard curren­
cy,  a  banking  and  credit  system,  a  system  of  credit  allocation  and  insurance, 
conditions  of individual  types  of payment,  a system  of state  investment  (Art.  12).
Businessmen  have  the  right  o f  independent  choice  of  the  types,  forms 
and  methods  o f  their  activities  within  the  zone  providing  these  do  not  con­
tradict  the  Ukrainian  legislation  currently  in  force  and  the  law  establishing 
the  zone  (Art.  15).
The  state  guarantees  to  foreign  investors  the  repatriation  of  their  profits 
and  capital  invested  within  the  zone  as  well  as  the  remittance  abroad  of  the 
income  earned  by  foreign  employees  from  their  work  in  the  free  economic 
zone  (Art.  13,  19).
Banking law
One  of  the  major  impediments  to  the  activities  of  foreign  investors  in 
Ukraine  derives  from  the  fact  that  the  development  of the  banking  system  in 
the  country  is,  for  all  practical  purposes,  still  in  the  bud  even  though  the 
Law  on  Banks  and  Banking  Activity  has  come  into  force.  The  latter  was 
endorsed  by  the  Supreme  Council  of Ukraine  in  March  1991.9
The  main  particularity  of the  law is  that  it envisages  the  possibility  of setting 
up  banks  of different  kinds  and  forms  of property.  Special  attention  should  be 
drawn  to  the  fact that  it allows  the  functioning of commercial  banks.
These  may  be  set  up  by  natural  and  legal  persons.  One  restriction  is  that 
the  share  of any  shareholder  o f such  a  bank  should  not  exceed  35  per  cent 
of its  statutory  capital.
Every  commercial  bank  must  be  registered.  For  this  purpose,  a  portfolio 
of documents  has  to  be  submitted  to  the  National  Bank  of  Ukraine.  The  lat­
ter  must  carry  out  the  registration  within  a  month  from  the  time  when  the 
necessary documents  have  been  submitted.

Law  on  Banks  and  Banking  Activity,  20  March  1991,  in  U nited  N ation s  E co n o m ic 
Comm ission f o r  Europe.

20
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
A  simplified  procedure  of entry  into  the  zone  for  foreigners  may  be  envis­
aged by  the  law  for  that  particular economic  zone  (Art.  22).
The  preservation  in  full  o f  all  property  and  non-property  rights  of  the 
subjects  o f economic  activity  of the  zone  in  the  case  of its  liquidation  is  also 
guaranteed  by  the  state.  Disputes  arising  in  connection  with  the  liquidation 
of  the  free  economic  zone  and  involving  foreign  subjects  operating  in  the 
zone  can  be  taken  to  litigation  before  judicial  or  arbitrational  bodies  chosen 
by  the  parties  concerned  including  those  located  abroad  (Art.'  25).
O ne  important  feature  is  that  the  law  allows  foreign  banks,  their  sub­
sidiaries  and  banks  with  foreign  participation  to  operate  in  Ukraine.  The 
procedure  for  registering  these  is  somewhat  different.  Thus,  in  addition  to 
the  decision  of  the  foreign  establishing  party  (participant)  to  set  up  a  bank 
or  a  subsidiary  on  the  territory  of Ukraine,  a  foreign  legal  person  also  has  to 
submit  the  written  consent  for  it  of  the  controlling  body  o f  the  country  in 
which  the  foreign  bank  is  located  if  the  legislation  o f  that  country  so 
requires.  As  far  as  foreign  citizens  are  concerned,  they  have  to  submit  a 
guarantee  of  solvency  from  a  reputable  bank;  and  two  recommendations 
from  foreign  legal  persons  or substantial  citizens  (Art.  22).
The  structure  of a  commercial  bank  must  correspond  to  the  general  provi­
sions  of the  Law  on  Entrepreneurship governing  the  relevant issues  (Art.  23).
In  the  case  when  a  bank  is  established  with  the  participation  of  foreign 
natural  or  legal  persons,  a  license  has  to  be  obtained  from  the  National 
Bank  of Ukraine  (Art.  49).
If  a  commercial  bank  is  going  to  carry  out  its  operations  in  foreign  cur­
rency  both  within  Ukraine  and  overseas,  it  should  apply  for  an  additional 
license  from  the  National  Bank  of Ukraine  (Art.  50).
Currency regulations
Some  of  the  issues  relating  to  the  sphere  of  foreign  investment  and  foreign 
trade  are  regulated  by  the  Decree  on  the  System  of  Currency  Regulation  and 
Currency Control  adopted by the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine  in March  1993-10
The  decree  is  designed  to  improve  the  currency  control  mechanism  by 
imposing  restriction  on  the  use  of  foreign  currency  and  establishing  licens­
ing  requirements  for transaction  o f foreign  currency.
Some  of its  regulations  touch  directly on  foreign  investors  involved  in  trade.
According  to  the  decree,  residents  (i.e.  foreign  citizens  with  permanent 
residence  in  Ukraine  and  branches  of foreign  firms  or  representative  offices 
located  in  Ukraine  and  conducting  their  activities  under  Ukrainian  law  [Art. 
1.5D  that  receive  revenues  in  foreign  currency  shall  convert  it  into  Ukrainian 
coupons  on  the  inter-bank  currency exchange.
However,  foreign  currency  earnings  received  by  enterprises  with  foreign 
investments  from  the  export  of goods  and  services  which  are  considered  by 
the  Ministry  of Foreign  Economic  Relations  as  internal  production  are exempt.
10 
Decree  on  the  System  of  Currency  Regulation  and  Currency  Control  in  Russian  a n d  
Com m onw ealth Business Law Report,
  17  May  1993-

CURRENT AFFAIRS
21
Services  provided  by  a  resident  entity  with  foreign  investment  to  an  entity 
non-resident  on  the  territory  o f  Ukraine  are  treated  as  exports  and  conse­
quently  their  hard  currency  revenues  that  they  receive  for  their  services  are 
exempt  too  from  the  mandatory  conversion  rule.
The  exemptions  also  encompass  foreign  currency  transferred  to  Ukraine 
for use  in  the  charter  funds  of enterprises  with  foreign  investment.
Some  provisions  of  the  decree  govern  the  activities  of  foreign  firms  that 
are  non-residents  (this  category  includes  subjects  of entrepreneurial  activity 
such  as  branches  and  representative  offices  of  the  entities  located  outside 
Ukraine  [Art.  1.6]).  Thus,  foreign  “non-resident”  employers  are  required  to 
pay  Ukrainian  citizens’  wages  in  foreign  currency  (Art.  7.  2).
The  decree  sets  up  licensing  procedures  for  currency,  which  means  that 
the  National  Bank  of Ukraine  will  issue  licenses  for  most uses  o f foreign  cur­
rency  or  for  exporting  Ukrainian  currency.
Foreign  investors  likewise  enjoy  certain  benefits  in  this  sphere.  Thus, 
there  are  cases  when  they  do  not  require  licenses.  These  include  making 
payments  in  foreign  currency  abroad  to  pay  for  interest  on  loans  or  to  trans­
fer  dividends  from  a  foreign  investment,  repatriating  funds  from  a  foreign 
investment  if the  investment  is  terminated.
Export regulations
Several  provisions  of  another  governm ental  legal  instrument  —   the 
Decree  on  Quotas  and  Licenses  for  the  Export  of Goods  of  12 January  1993 
—   also  touch  upon  some  important  issues  concerning  the  sphere  of foreign 
trade  and  foreign  investments.11
The  aim  of  the  decree  is  to  protect  the  internal  market  of  Ukraine  by 
introducing  a  system  of  export  quotas  and  licenses  on  goods  (the  list  of 
them  includes  mostly  readily  marketable  raw  materials),  works  or  services 
taken  out  of Ukraine  in  the  course  of foreign  trade.
T he  d ecree  suspends  the  sections  o f  Art.  9  o f  the  Law  on  Foreign 
Investments  which  provides  guarantees  against  unfavourable  changes  in 
Ukrainian  legislation  regarding  the  export  of  goods  purchased  by  foreign 
investors  in  the  Ukrainian  market,  as  well  as  the  section  of  Art.  14  of  the 
same  law  dealing  with  the  permitted  license-free  export  of goods  which  for­
eign  investors  purchase  in  Ukraine.
On  the  other  hand,  according  to  the  same  decree,  business  or  individuals 
do  not  have  to  register  with  the  state  in  order  to  engage  in  foreign  trade 
operations. 

11 
Decree  No.  6-93  on  Quotas  and  Licenses  for  the  Export  of  Goods  (Work,  Services)  in 
Russia a n d  Comm onwealth Business Law Report,
  8  March  1993.

22
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
SOCIAL DOCTRINE,  RELIGION AND STATE-BUILDING
Bishop Ihor  (Isichenko)
The  evangelic  mission  of  the  Church  in  the  world,  determined  by  the 
plan  of  divine  redemption  incomprehensible  in  its  majesty,  is  embodied  in 
diverse  and  manifold  social  activities,  which  are  called  to  illuminate  with  the 
light  of truth  the  one  true  path  of  mankind  in  history  —   the  path  to  eternal 
life.  “No  one  after  lighting  a  lamp  covers  it  with  a  vessel,  or  puts  it  under  a 
bed,  but  puts  it  on  a  stand,  that  those  who  enter  may  see  the  light”.  (Luke, 
viii.  16)  It  is  for  us  to  be  such  a  lamp-stand  which  our  prayers  and  good 
work  spread  afar,  to  our  native  land  and  the  diaspora  the  kindly  light  of the 
good  tidings  of redemption.
The  forces  hostile  to  the  Christian  Church,  which  failed  to  defeat  it  during 
the  modern-day  persecution  of  our  faith,  have  changed  their  strategy.  They 
have,  alas,  been  able  lo  divide  Ukrainian  Christians,  to  instigate  inter-confes­
sional  rivalry,  to  install  among  the  clergy  individuals  discredited  in  the  past 
and  still  unrepentant,  lacking  in  spiritual  and  moral  qualities,  and  to  seduce 
a  section  of the  clergy  and  faithful  with  the  pursuit  of wealth,  glory,  and  the 
support  of the  authorities.  And  so  the  authority  o f the  Orthodox  Church,  first 
and  foremost,  our  independent  Orthodox  Church,  has  declined  in  the  eyes 
of  the  people,  and  suspicion  and  a  lack  of  confidence  in  the  clergy  has 
spread  among  the  laity.
In  spite  of  the  slate’s  apparent  tolerance  of  the  Ukrainian  Church  the 
treatment  of the  faith  and  faithful  by  parliamentary  and  government  officials 
has  in  general  not  changed  since  Soviet  times.  Tax  concessions  and  the 
encouragement  of  charitable  activities  remains  an  empty  dream;  there  has 
been  no  compensation  for  parishes  and  religious  associations  which  were 
deprived  of  their  churches  and  property;  many  church  buildings  are  still 
used  as  museums,  concert  halls,  and  cinemas;  no  denomination  has  been 
allocated  air-time  for  television  and  radio  evangelisation  (except  for  foreign 
missionaries  with  fat  bank-rolls);  religious  education  is  not  allowed  in  the 
majority  o f  schools;  long  negotiations  about  establishing  an  institute  for 
chaplains  have  so  far  been  fruitless  —   apart  form  illegal  attempts  to  get 
priests  to  take  army  jobs  in  the  Socio-Psychological  Service  o f the  Ministry  of 
Defence.  Archaic  and  contradictory  laws  on  religion  provide  all  kinds  of 
opportunities  for  abuses,  including  the  many  months-long  outrages  against 
the  civil  dignity  of  the  faithful  of  the  UAOC,  still  proscribed,  persecuted  in
j  iiiur  Isich en ko   is  Bishop  o f  Kharkiv  and  Poltava  in  the  U krainian  A utocephalic 
O rthod ox  Church.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
23
the  mass  media  and  deprived of legal  rights,  just  as  it used  to  be  under  Peter 
I  and  Joseph  Stalin.  The  Council  for  Religious  Affairs  remains,  as  ever,  an 
instrument  for  discrimination  and  incitement  of  religious  hostility;  and  its 
Stalinist-Communist  character  has  remained  impervious  to  any  changes  of 
personnel.
We  are  proud  that  we  have  managed  to  repeat  the  achievement  of  the 
catacomb  Church  of  apostolic  times,  laying  ourselves  open  to  persecution, 
suffering  from  threats  and  coercion,  forced  to  hold  religious  services  in  pri­
vate  apartments  or  in  the  open  air.  “Blessed  are  you  when  men  revile  you 
and  persecute  you  and  utter  all  kinds  o f  evil  against  you  falsely  on  my 
account”.  (Matthew  v .l l )   But  is  it  not  tragic,  that  we,  who  pray  in  every  ser­
vice  for  Ukraine,  the  government  and  the  army,  have  to  realise  that  the  first 
leadership  of  our  reestablished  state,  by  its  anti-religious  policies  is  calling 
down  the  wrath  of God  upon  the  country.  We  have  to  be  the  voice  of con­
science,  calling  to  repentance  and  conversion.  We  still  have  to  turn  to  the 
authorities  with  a  word  o f love  and  reconciliation.  But  at  the  same  time  we 
have  to  reject,  firmly  and  consistently,  the  temptation  to  submit  to  the  will  of 
the  state,  even  to  our  own  Ukrainian  state,  and  to  a  lay  leadership,  even  the 
most  democratic  in  the  world.  For  a  state  Church  is  no  longer  a  Church.  It  is 
a  governm ent  Department  o f  Religious  Affairs;  if  we  acknow ledge  the 
supremacy  o f lay  laws  over  the  dogmas  and  canons  of the  Church,  then  we 
begin  to  serve  Satan,  who  once  offered  to  Christ  all  the  kingdoms  of  the 
world  and  all  the  glory  of them,  saying  “All  these  I  will  give  you  if you  will 
fall  down  and  worship  me”.  (Matthew,  iv.10)
In  acknowledging  the  principle  of the  separation  of Church  and  State,  we 
see  in  the  realisation  of this  principle  a  vast  field  for  the  use  of  the  spiritual 
potential  o f  the  Church  for  the  higher  good  o f  the  Ukrainian  nation,  which 
today  faces  the  possibility  o f  forfeiting  not  only  the  life  of  the  world  to 
come,  but  also  its  existence  on  Earth.  The  spectre  of  degeneration  and  ruin 
is  growing  ever  more  visible.  Society  has  rejected  the  Christian  idea  of eter­
nal  life,  and  is  falling  prey  to  the  influence  of  the  new  inhumane  culture  of 
death.  The  death  penalty,  suicide,  crime,  mutual  hatred  and  cruelty,  the 
mass  killing  of unborn  babies,  the  cult  of gross  physical  force  come  together 
into  a  complete  satanic  system,  which  is  assailing  the  consciousness  of  the 
masses.  And  the  unprecedented  scale  of forms  of slow  suicide  such  as  alco­
holism  and  drug  abuse,  place  a  direct  choice  before  us,  not  somewhere  in 
the  future,  but  this  very  day:  with  Christ  to  life,  or  else  into  the  abyss  of 
non-being  through  anti-God  fossilisation  of atheist  thinking.  By  transferring, 
with  the  help  of  other  Churches  and  individual  state  officials,  the  ideas  of 
Christian  ethics  and  anthropology  into  the  field  o f  realistic  social  pro­
grammes,  we  can  effectively counteract  this  wave  of destruction.
The  individual  freedom,  which  is  so  attractive  to  post-totalitarian  society, 
can  easily  turn  into  anarchy  and  permissiveness,  under  conditions  o f spiritu­
al  vacuum,  which  aspire  to  implement  teachings  and  ideologies  which  are 
incompatible  with  Christianity.  It  is  amoral  to  be  a  passive  observer  of  the

24
THE UKRAINIAN REVIEW
advance  of  occult  and  esoteric  doctrines,  communities  of  sexual  minorities 
and  neo-Communist  groupings.  We  must  firmly  and  consistently  defend 
society  against  the  cult  o f  personal  gain  and  sexual  depravity,  the  misan­
thropic  ideology  of  class  struggle  and  racial  discrimination.  We  stand  in 
defence  o f marriage  and  the  family,  the  right  of the  individual  to  ownership, 
in  defence  of  dignity  and  social  security  for  children,  invalids,  the  sick  and 
the  old.  And  in  order  to  carry  out  our  social  obligations  we  demand  from 
the  state  the  following:
•  the  legal  recognition  of  the  UAOC,  legal  guarantees  of  its  development 
and  compensation  for  past  wrongs  committed  against  it;
•  air-lime,  free  of  charge,  on  Ukrainian  television  and  radio  to  be  given 
to  the  broadcasting  of  Sunday  and  l:cast-day  services  and  daily  religious 
instruction;
•  encouragement  of  charitable  activities  through  the  introduction  of  tax- 
concessions  for  donors;
•  support  for the  publishing  activities  of the  Church;
•  strict  limits  on  the  propaganda  of  amorality,  the  class  struggle,  trade  in 
alcohol  and  cigarettes,  prostitution;
•  a  clear  juridical  definition  of  the  murder  of  an  unborn  child  as  a  most 
serious  crime;
•  the  abolition  of the  death  penalty;
•  legal  and  economic  guarantees  allowing  pastoral  care  to  be  provided 
for  the  army,  prisoners,  the  sick,  invalids,  schoolchildren  and  students,  resi­
dents  of orphanages  and  pensioners’  homes  for  war  and  work  veterans;
•  the  creation  of  opportunities  for  extending  the  network  of  religious 
schools,  kindergartens,  clinics,  hospitals,  including  the  cost  of  handing  over 
slate  property  to  Church  ownership.
The  main  precondition  for  an  understanding  to  be  reached  between  the 
State  and  the  Church  is  the  abolition  of  that  shameful  relic  of  atheist  totali­
tarianism  —   the  Council  for  Religious  Affairs  and  its  departments  in  the 
provinces.  Experience  shows  that  this  institution  is  incapable  of  anything 
except  a  voluntarist  interference  in  religious  life  in  pursuit  of certain  political 
and  material  ends.  Us  corrupt  structures  are  trying  to  woo  the  Ukrainian 
Orthodox  Church-Kyiv  Patriarchate  in  Kyiv,  the  Ukrainian  Greek-Catholic 
Church  in  Lviv,  and  the  Ukrainian  Orthodox  Church-Moscow  Patriarchate  in 
Kharkiv,  but  have  nowhere  got  any  useful  results.  The  job  of  ensuring  the 
liaison  o f  church  institutions  with  the  government  and  local  authorities 
could  perfectly  well  be  carried  out  by  a  highly  qualified  lawyer,  whose  job 
can  be  attached  to  the  Cabinet  of  Ministers,  the  provincial  and  the  Kyiv 
municipal  administrations.
People  sometimes  attempt  to  gauge  the  level  of  our  patriotism  by  our 
readiness  to  carry  out  blindly  the  plans  of  the  state  apparatus,  political  par­
ties  and  movements.  This  is  a  rather  strange,  if  not  absurd  position.  A 
Christian  looks  at  relations  between  the  Church,  the  Slate  and  the  political 
parties  differently.  Our  slate  and  political  parlies  are  Ukrainian  insofar  as

CURRENT AFFAIRS
25
they  are  capable  of  assessing  and  respecting  religious-church  traditions  of 
the  Ukrainian  nation,  the  bearer  of  which  is  the  UAOC.  We  are  ready  for 
dedicated  and  self-sacrificing  work,  but  not  in  the  political  interests  of a  par­
ticular  government,  party  or  group,  but  on  behalf  of  the  whole  nation  and 
all  the  people  of  God.  We  do  not  demand  concessions  and  privileges  —  
only  normal  relations  and  legal  protection.
The  first  attempts  at  the  direct  participation  of the  clergy  in  elections  and 
parliamentary  activities  resulted  in  tragicomedy,  personified  first  and  fore­
most  by  Metropolitan  Ahatanhel  Savyn.  This  is  a  warning  to  us  all.  A  priest, 
and  even  more  so  a  bishop,  must  not  neglect  his  pastoral  duties  in  order  to 
perform  certain  obligations  towards  an  extra-ecclesiastical  group  of  persons 
who  elected  or  supported  him.  Life  brings  us  to  the  necessity  o f strengthen­
ing  the  Church’s  traditional  ban  on  the  clergy  holding  state  positions  or 
being  members  of  political  parties.  We  must  strengthen  the  social  doctrine 
of  the  Church  from  the  pulpit,  testifying  to  it  and  teaching  the  laity,  from 
among  whom  must  be  raised  up  qualified  politicians,  better  fitted  than  the 
clergy  to  defend  Christian  ideals  at  party  meetings,  rallies  or  in  Parliament.
This  demands  a  wide  and  branched  network  of  public  organisations  of 
Orthodox  laymen.  The  All-Ukrainian  Brotherhood  of St.  Andrew  the  Apostle 
is  a  good  example  of  such  an  organisation,  although  its  own  status  within 
the  Church  is  still  uncertain  and  not  defined  by  statute.  But  nothing  is  being 
done  in  the  field  of sororities  (for  the  attempts  of politicised  women  in  Kyiv 
to  declare  themselves  a  sorority  proved  unsuccessful),  artistic  societies, 
clubs,  associations,  etc.  These  should  all  occupy  an  honourable  place  in 
drawing  up  the  church  statute,  and  in  the  everyday  practice  of  pastoral 
activities  of our parishes.
Society  longs  to  see  in  the  Church  not  a  banal  public  association,  but  a 
higher  model,  an  immutable  moral  force,  a  firm  defender  of  spiritual  tradi­
tions.  And  if  today  we  declare  that  we  are  ready  to  hurry  into  new  inter­
church  alliances,  this  not  only  deals  a  destructive  blow  to  the  authority  of 
the  national  Church,  but  may  even  be  seen  as  that  Church’s  blessing  on  the 
whole  country’s  entering  a  similar  political  alliance  —   the  Economic  union, 
the  CIS  political  union,  and  then  there  we  are  back  in  our  old  role  of 
“younger  brother”  in  a  restored  USSR.  Let  us  consider  this  well  before  talk­
ing  about  any  union.  Let  us  consult  our  partners:  the  Ukrainian  Greek- 
Catholic  Church  as  the  second  national  Church  of Ukraine,  and  the  two suc­
cessors  of  the  Kyiv  Exarchate  of  the  Russian  Orthodox  Church  —   the 
Ukrainian  Orthodox  Churches  of the  Kyiv  and  Moscow  Patriarchates.  Let  us 
forget  petty  grievances  and  our  own  ambitions;  let  us  instead  study  diligent­
ly  and  carefully  our  church  dogmas,  canons  and  regulations.  Let  us  read  his­
tory  lest  we  go  into  a  council  intended  to  promote  unity  and  come  out  dis­
membered  into  even  more  splinters.
I  see  a  slow,  sure,  honest  and  uncompromising  way  to  a  single  Ukrainian 
Particular  Christian  Church.  This  is  the  path  towards  spiritual  freedom,  not  a 
protectorate  o f  Moscow,  Rome,  Constantinople  or  a  secular  government.

26
THE UKRAINIAN REVIEW
Undue  haste  and  disregard  for  church  norms  and  traditions  will  result  in 
new  schisms.  Therefore  we  have  to  begin  by  calling  a  halt  to  mutual  dis- 
creditation,  and  establishing  an  all-Ukrainian  inter-confessional  pre-synodial 
commission  with  permanent  working-groups  in  every  Church  o f the  Eastern 
rite,  painstaking  checking  of  the  canonicity  of  ordinations  and  church  deci­
sions,  repentance  for  the  violation  of canons  (clerical  appointments  decided 
by  the  interference  of  the  authorities,  back-handers  for  ordination,  dedica­
tion,  reordinations,  clerics  continuing  to  conduct  services  while  under  sus­
pension,  etc.),  coordination  of  ritual  niceties,  the  drawing  up  o f  a  joint 
statute  and  joint  translation  of service  books  and  Eucharistical  unity  around 
a  single  see.  After  that  there  will  be  no  difficulty  in  convening  a  truly  all- 
Ukrainian  synod  and  electing  a  single  head  of  the  national  Particular 
Apostolic Church.
The  problem  to  reach  inter-confessional  agreem ent  is,  undoubtedly, 
extremely  vital.  But  this  does  not  give  the  right  to  let  everything  else  go  by 
the  board  and just go  on  holding  endless  discussions  about  unity,  perceiving 
this  as  a  panacea  for  all  evils.  Our  Church  was  never  so  much  one,  as  after 
1946,  but  never  was  it  so  spiritually  weak.  Let  us  not  repeat  past  mistakes! 
Let  us  grow  into  a  Church  that  is  creative,  building  and  advancing.  And 
when  we  thrust  aside  these  artificially-created  barriers,  and  spread  and  the 
cloak  o f  our  holy  m other’s  protection  over  all  strata  o f  the  people  of 
Ukraine,  then  we  shall  have  taken  the  decisive  step  in  the  transition  from 
hostile  enmity  to unity  in  love  before  the  throne  of God. 

1   ...   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   ...   44


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling