Editorial board slava stetsko


Download 16.82 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet38/44
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi16.82 Mb.
1   ...   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   ...   44
him  busy,  whilst  his  satellite,  Anton,  is 
ever  at  work  in the  stables —  an  excellent  little man.33
Jun e  19  ...O ur  daily  routine  has  possessed  a  settled  regularity  for  a  long  time. 
...Between  8  and  8.30  the  men  are  out  and  about,  fetching  ice  for  melting,  etc.  Anton  is 
off to  feed the  ponies,  Demetri  to see  to the  dogs.. .34
21  Edward W.  Nelson,  the  expedition biologist.
22  SLE,  Vol.  1,  pp.  230-231.
23 W.  Lashly,  Chief Stoker on the  Terra Nova,  in  charge  of the motor sledges.
23  SLE,Vol  1.  pp.  237-238.
25 The  base  of Scott's  previous,  Discovery,  expedition,  used  as  an  auxiliary  base  on  the  Terra 
Nova
 expedition.
26  F. J.  Hooper,  the  expedition Steward.
27 Thomas Clissold,  the  expedition  Cook.
2»  SLE,  Vol.  1,  pp.  238.
29  Henry  R.  Bowers,  Lieutenant,  Royal  Indian  Marines.  One  of  Scott's  companions  at  the 
South  Pole.
30 Apsley  Cherry-Garrard, Assistant zoologist.
31  Petty Officer Thomas Crean,  R.N.
32  SLE,  Vol.  1,  p.  248.
33  Ibid,  p.  263.
34  Ibid,  p.  319.

HISTORY
33
June  22,  MIDWINTER  "observed  with  all  the  festivity  customary at Xmas  at  home.
...after  this  show  (of  slides  made  by  Ponting]  the  table  was  restored  for  snapdragon 
and  a  brew  of  milk  punch  was  prepared  in  which  we  drank  the  health  of  Campbell’s 
Party35  and  of our  good  friends  in  the  Terra Nova. Then  the table was  again  removed  and 
a set  of lancers36  formed.
By  this  lime  the  effect  of stimulating  liquid refreshment  on  men  so  long  accustomed  to 
a  simple  life  became  apparent.  Our  biologist  had  retired  to  bed,  the  silent  Soldier  [Oates] 
bubbled with humour  and  insisted on dancing  with Anton...37
July  14.  At  noon  yesterday,  one  of  the  best  ponies,  'Bones',  suddenly  went  off  his 
feed  —  soon  after  it  was  evident  that  he  was  suffering  from  colic.  Oates  called  my  atten­
tion  to  it,  but  we  were  neither  much  alarmed...  later  the  pony  was  sent  out  for  exercise 
with  Crean...  when  he  returned  to  the  stable,  he  was  evidently  worse,  and  Oates  and 
Anton  patiently  dragged  a  sack  to and  fro  under  his  stomach...38
August  15  ...It  is  very  pleasant  to  note  the  excellent  relations  which  our  young
Russians  have  established  with  other  folk;  they  both  work  very  hard,  Anton  having  most 
to  do...  Both  are  on  the  best  terms  with  their  messmate,  and  it  was  amusing  last  night  to 
see little Anton jamming  a  felt hat over  P.  O.  Evans'  head  in  high good humour.39
October  13  ...The  ponies  have  been  behaving  well,  with  exceptions...  The  most  trou­
blesome  animal  is  Christopher.  He  is  only  a  source  of  amusement  so  long  as  there  is  no 
accident,  but  I  am  always  a  little  anxious  that  he  will  kick  or  bite  someone.  The  curious 
thing  is  that he  is  quiet enough  to handle for walking  or  riding  exercise or  in the stable,  but 
as  soon  as  a  sledge  comes  into  the  programme  he  is  seized with  a  very  demon  of vicious­
ness,  and  bites  and  kicks  with every  intent to do  injury.  It  seems to  be getting harder rather 
than easier to get  him  into  the  trances;  the last two turns,  he has  had  to  be  thrown,  as  he  is 
unmanageable  even  on  three  legs.  Oates,  Bowers  and  Anton  gather  round  the  beast  and 
lash  up  one  foreleg,  then  with  his  head  held  on  both  sides  Oates  gathers  back  the  traces; 
quick  as  lightning  the  little  beast  flashes  round  with  legs  flying  aloft.  This  goes  on  until 
some  degree  of exhaustion  gives the  men a  better chance.  But  as  I  have  mentioned,  during 
the  last  two days the  period has  been  so  prolonged that Oates  has had to  hasten  matters by 
tying  a  short line to the other  foreleg and throwing the  beast  when he lashes  out..."*0
November  1.  [The  departure  for the  Pole]  ...This morning  we  got  away  in  detachments 
...Bones  [pony]  ambled off gently with Crean  and  I  led Snippets  in  his  wake...
The  wind  blew  very  strong  at  the  Razor  Back  [island]  and  the  sky  was  threatening  —  
the  ponies  hate  the  wind.  A  mile south  of this  island  Bowers  and Victor [his  pony]  passed 
me,  leaving  me where  I  best  wished to be —  at the  tail  of the line.
About this place  I saw one  of the animals  ahead had stopped and was obstinately refusing 
to  go  forward  again.  1  had  a  great  fear  it  was  Chinaman,  the  unknown  quantity,  but  to  my 
relief  found  it  was  my  old  friend  'Nobby1.  As  he  is  very  strong  and  fit the  matter  was  soon 
adjusted  with  a  little  persuasion  from  Anton  behind.  Poor  little  Anton  found  it  difficult  to 
keep  the pace with short legs.35 * 37 38 * 40 41
35  Lieutenant  Victor  L.  A.  Campbell,  R.N.  Leader  of  an  exploring  party  which  wintered  in 
Victoria  Land.
3® The  most  famous  of what  are  now  termed  “Old Time”  dances,  the  “Lancers"  was  an  indis­
pensable  part  o f family  celebrations  in the Victorian  and  Edwardian eras  in all  levels  of society.
37  SLE,  Vol.  1,  p.  327.
38  Ibid,  p.  351-352.
37  Ibid,  p.  381-382.
40  Ibid,  p. 426-427
41  Ibid,  p. 447-448

34
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
And  with  that  last  glimpse,  we  lose  sight  o f Anton.  Scott  does  not  even 
tell  us  how  far  he  accompanied  the  Polar  party  on  its  way,  nor  how  he 
returned  to  base.  His  case  is  not  unique.  We  know  from  the  diary  entries 
from  O cto b er  28  and  31  that  Ponting  the  photograp her  and  Edward 
Atkinson  the  surgeon  set  out  for  Hut  Point  —   the  first  halt  on  the  route  to 
the  Poled2  But  the  diary  does  not  mention  when  they  turned  back  either. 
This  should  not  be  put  down  to  indifference  or  negligence  on  Scott’s  part. 
His  account  is,  after  all,  only  a  diary  —   and  from  November  1  onwards,  a 
diary  written  in  a  chilly  tent,  after  a  hard  day’s  sledging.  Later  departures,  as 
the  Polar  party  was  gradually  whittled  down  to  the  occupants  of  a  single 
tent,  were  meticulously  noted.  But  in  the  bustle  of  departure,  with  various 
groups  setting  off at  different  times,  it was  a  somewhat  different  situation.
Summing  up  Scott’s  account,  we  observe  that Anton  had  the  reputation  of 
an  extremely  hard  worker  —   on  an  expedition  where  everyone,  from  the 
leader  downwards,  worked  unremittingly!  He  was  skilled  in  the  manage­
ment  of horses,  and  had  a  dry  humour  in  his  insight  into  equine  psychology
—   as  his  comments  on  the  death  o f Hackenschmidt  reveal.  He  was  on  good 
terms  with  his  messmates  —   the  living  quarters  in  the  Hut  at  Cape  Evans 
were  divided  in  naval  fashion  into  “officers’”  [including  scientists’]  and 
“men’s”  quarters^  — joining  —   insofar  as  limitations  of  language  permitted
—   in  any  fun  and  amusement.  He  clearly  disliked  abandoning  anything  he 
had  started  —   even  continuing  to  smoke  a  cigar  between  bouts  of sea-sick­
ness.  And  he  was  of small  stature.
Such  was  the  information  available  to  Bolotnikov,  when,  in  1965,  he  trav­
elled  to  Batky  to  meet Anton  Omelchenko’s  surviving  family  and  friends.
His  account,  in  Moira  Dunbar’s  translation,  reads  as  follows:
In  Bat'ki  I  met  Nataliya  Yefrimovna,  Anton  Lukich’s  widow  (she  had  remarried  three 
years  after  his  death),  his  son  Illarion  Antonovich  and  family,  and  the  older  villagers  who 
remembered  Anton  well.  From  their  accounts,  and  the  letters  of  Zabegaylo  and  Illarion 
Omelchenko.  I  have  succeeded  in  establishing  the  main  facts  about  Anton's  life,  without 
question,  an  unusual  and  curious  one.
He  was  born  in  B a t'k i  in  1883  into  the  family  o f  a  hereditary  farm er,  Luki 
Omel'chenko,  a  family not  over-favoured  by  fortune,  whose  main  wealth  consisted  of the 
children  of two  marriages.  There  was  not  enough  land to  feed  them,  and  the  older  broth­
ers,  like  many  of their  fellow-villagers,  went  away  to  find  work,  mostly  to  the  Stavropol' 42 *
42  Ibid,
  p.  446
4i
  This  arrangement,  although  in  accordance  with  social  practice  of the  time,  was  not  Scott's 
original  intention.  His  original  plans  were  for  an  arrangement  of cubicles,  but  during  the  erec­
tion  of  the  hut,  there  was  found  to  be  insufficient  space.  Accordingly,  a  bulkhead  o f storages 
was  built  to  partition  the  hut  into  “men’s”  and  “officers’”  space.  Distressing  as  sucn  an  arrange­
ment  may  be  to  the  late-20th  century  ideas  on  equality,  one  may  note  that  a)  the  "men”  were 
largely  naval  or  ex-naval  personnel  —   and  even  today,  would  find  nothing  strange  in  such  a 
division;  b)  the  scientists  who  lived  in  the  "officers’”  quarters  spent  much  o f their  “free”  time  in 
the  evenings  either  working  or else lecturing  to  each  other  on scientific  subjects;  c)  the  cooking 
stove  —   the  main  source  of  heat  for  the  Hut,  was  in  the  men's  quarters.  See  SLE,  pp.  96-98. 
Griffith Taylor's  material,  below.

HISTORY
35
district.  Anton  was  the seventh  and  youngest  of the  family.  He set  out  to  earn  his  living  at 
the  age  o f  ten,  landing  up  on  the  estate  of  Mikhail  Adamovich  Pekhovskiy  near 
Mineral'nye  Vody.  At  first  Anton  worked  as  a  herdboy  with  the  dairy  herd,  and  then  he 
got  a  place  looking  after  the  horses.  Pekhovskiy  had  a  stud  farm,  with  a  large  herd  of 
pure-bred horses.  It  was  here  that  the  young Omel'chenko  found his  vocation.
Small,  light,  quick  of movement  and  clever,  it seemed that Anton was  born  to  be a  rider. 
Pekhovskiy,  a  passionate  horseman,  immediately  saw  the  boy's  potential  and  turned  him 
over  for  instruction  to  an  experienced  trainer,  an  Englishmen.  From  this  trainer  Anton 
learned  not only to  handle  unbroken  racehorses,  but  to  speak  fairly  fluent  English.  In gen­
eral,  the  landowner  had  guessed  right:  in  a  few  years  Anton  became  a  first-dass  jockey, 
rode  in races  and  won many  prizes,  bringing  excellent publicity to the  Pekhovskiy stud.
After  Pckhovskiy's  death,  the  estate  came  into  the  possession  of  Colonel  Vedernikov. 
The  new  owner  took  a  fancy  to  his  jockey,  look  him  everywhere  and  indulged  him  in 
every  way. They  lived  for long  periods  in St.  Petersburg,  Moscow,  and  other  large  Russian 
cities,  travelled  to  Central  Asia  to  buy  pure-bred  racers,  twice  went  abroad  to  take  part  in 
race-meetings  in  England  and  in  Austria-Hungary.  When  the  Russo-Japanese  war  broke 
out,  Vedernikov  set  out  for  the  Far  East,  taking  Omel'chenko  with  him.  According  to 
Zabegaylo,  Anton  worked  in  Vladivostok  as  a jockey  at  the  hippodrome,  and  it  was there, 
late  in  1909,  that  he  met  Scott's  agent,  Lieutenant  William  Bruce,  with  whom  he  went  to 
Harbin  to  buy the  Manchurian ponies...
...I  heard  many  nice  things  about  Omel'chenko  from  his  wife  and  fellow-villagers, 
who  described  him  as  a  sincere  and  likable  man  with  a  cheerful  disposition.  He  played 
the  balalayka  well,  and  even  when  over  forty,  danced  tirelessly  and  lightly  on  festive 
occasions.'1'*
Bolotnikov’s  material,  we  may  note,  tallies  with  and  supplements  Scott’s 
diary  in  a  number  of  important  points:  Anton’s  small  stature  (essential  in  a 
jockey),  his  skill  with  horses  (if  he  could  handle  unbroken  racehorses,  his 
ability  to  help  deal  with  the  kicking  Hackenschmidt  and  the  recalcitrant 
Christopher  falls  into  place),  and  his  presence  in  Vladivostok.
As  we  have  already  noted,  Scott’s  diary,  plus  Bolotnikov’s  account,  constitut­
ed  the  entirety  of the  material  available  to  the  Ukrainian  Geographical  Society, 
when  it  approached  the  Scott  Polar  Institute  seeking  for  further  information. 
The  reply  from  the  Institute  referred  only  to  the  “ship’s  book”  of the  expedition 
—   and  ev en   th ere,  as  we  have  noted,  m isin terp reted   V lad iv o sto k , 
Omelchenko’s  current  place  of residence,  as  his  place  of birth.  Furthermore,  it 
did  not  pass  on  to  Ukraine  one  small  but significant  fact  contained  in  that  reg­
ister.  In  signing  on  for the  expedition,  on  28 October  1910,  Anton Omelchenko 
gave  his  age  as  26.  But  according  to  Bolotnikov,  he  was  born  in  1883-  If 
Bolotnikov  is  correct —  that  is,  if Anton’s  wife  and son  remembered his  year of 
birth  correctly,  then  we  may  assume  that  Anton  was  born  towards  the  end  of 
1883,  that  is,  not earlier than 29 October New Style  (17 October,  O.S.).
Since  the  publication  o f Dunbar’s  translation,  Bolotnikov’s  account  seems 
to  have  been  accepted  without  question  as  part  of  the  canon  of  the  Polar 
biography.  The  diary  of  Edward  Wilson,  Chief  of  the  Expedition’s  scientific 
staff,  was  not  published  until  1972."*5  This  book  is  presented  with  all  the 44 45
44
  Dunbar,  op.  cil.,  p. 499-500.
45  Edward  A.  Wilson,  D iary  o f  the  Terra  N ova  E xpedition  to  the A ntarctic,  1910-1912  (here­
inafter  DTNE),  London,  1972.  Dr.  Wilson  was  one  of Scott's  companions  at the  South  Pole.

36
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
apparatus  o f modern  scholarship,  including  a  biographical  appendix,  which, 
for  O m elchenko  and  Girev,  simply  reproduce,  in  precis,  Bolotnikov’s 
accou nt.  Thus  we  read  o f  Anton  that  “w hile  w orking  as  a  jo ck ey   in 
Vladivostok,  he  met  Scott’s  agent Wilfred  Bruce  (q.v.)  and  travelled  with  him 
to  Harbin  to  buy  Manchurian  ponies”.'*6  Yet  when  we  turn  to  the  reference 
to  Bruce,  we  find  that  “an  entertaining  and  little-known  account  o f  this 
episode  is  given  by  Bruce  in  an  article  in  the  magazine  The B lu e Peter,  June 
1932”.4
4 * * 47  And  when  one  turns  up  the  relevant  issue  of  that  magazine,  one 
finds  a  somewhat different  account  of Bruce’s  role.
Bruce,  whose  sister,  Kathleen,  was  Scott’s  wife,48  was,  in  1909,  Chief Officer 
on  a  P.  and  O.  mail  ship  operating  the  China-Japan  route.  When  Scott  began 
recruiting  for  the  expedition,  Bruce  volunteered  his  services.  Scott,  however, 
felt  obliged  to  reject  him  “letting  me  know  that  he  would  gladly  have  taken 
me,  but  he  had  seven  thousand  volunteers,  and  could  only  take  the  fittest.  As 
he  knew that I  had slight varicose  veins  in  my legs,  and  as  I was his brother-in- 
law,  he  was  sorry  he  could  not see  his  way  to  accept me”.49
Nevertheless  “in  the  spring  of  1910,  I  received  in  China  a  letter  asking  me 
if  I  would  care  to  join  the  ship  —   more  or  less  as  a  sailing  ship  expert  —  
but with  no  prospect  of going  with  him  to  the  South  Pole”.50
Bruce  obtained  the  necessary  leave  of  absence,  and  rushed  back  to 
London  via  the  Trans-Siberian  railway —   only  to  find  Scott  had  tried,  unsuc­
cessfully,  to  intercept  him  by  a  telegram  sent  to  Irkutsk:
as  Cecil  Meares,  who  had  been  sent  to  Siberia  to  collect  ponies  and  dogs  for  the 
Expedition,  had  asked  for  another  man  to  assist  to  transport  them  from  Vladivostok  to 
New  Zealand.  Captain  Lawrence  Oates  was  eventually  to  take  charge  of  the  ponies,  and 
Scott  had  intended to  send  him  out  to  Meares.  But Oates  very  much  wanted  to  sail  all  the 
way  on  the  Terra  Nova,  so  Scott  asked  me  if  I  would  mind  taking  his  place,  as  the  long 
sea  voyage would probably be  no  attraction  for  me...
...I  spent  the  next  few  weeks  saying  goodbye  to  relatives  in  the  country  and  left 
London for Vladivostok  on July  9th.
Meares  met  me at once to see  the  twenty ponies  and  thirty-one  dogs  which  he had  col­
lected up  country,  and with which  he  was  quite pleased...  .
On July  26th,  we shipped  out  ponies  and  dogs  on  the  small Japanese  steamer  Tategam i 
Muru.
  The  shipment  was  a  dreadful  experience,  rain  was  falling  in  torrents,  the  streets  and 
quays many  inches  deep  in mud. The ponies  were  obstreperous, two of them breaking away 
twice.  We  had three  Russian grooms, two for the  ponies  and one for the  dogs.
44  DTNE,  p.  253.
47  Ibid,  p.  250.
48  Scott  had  married  Bruce's  sister,  Kathleen,  a  talented  sculptress,  in  1908.  The  only  child  of
the  marriage  was  Peter  Markham Scott  (1909-1989),  who,  in  accordance  with  his  father's  last  let­
ter (“Make  the  boy  interested  in  Natural  History...  they  encourage  it  at  some  schools”)  grew  up 
to  be  Sir  Peter  Scott,  the  eminent  ornithologist.  After  Scott's  death,  Kathleen  was  given  the  title 
of Lady  Scott  and  the  rank  of a  widow  of a  Knight of the  Bath.  The  Scott  memorial  in  Waterloo 
Place,  London,  is  by  Lady Scott.
49  W.  M.  Bruce,  CBE,  RD,  RNR,  "Reminiscences  of  the  Terra  N ova  in  the  Antarctic”,  The 
B lu e Peter,
  Vol.  XII,  No.  123,  June,  1932,  p.  270
50  Ibid.

HISTORY
37
Anton,  one  of  the  grooms,  recaptured  the  truant  ponies  on  each  occasion.  When  for 
the  second  time,  he  had  recaptured  them,  I  had  got  a  long  rope  led  through  the  horse­
box  on  which  they  were  to  be  hoisted  on  board,  and manned  it  at  the shipend with  three 
or  four  heavy  men.  Whilst trying  to  fasten the  other  end  to  a  pony’s  head,  with Anton  sit­
ting  on  its  back,  the  pony  reared  right  up  on  its  hind  legs,  and  before  I  could  dodge 
clear,  came  down  with  one  foreleg  on  each  of my  shoulders.  I  was  much  less  hurt  than  I 
would  have  expected,  as  the ponies  were  not shod.51
The  journey  was  —   to  say  the  least  —   not  an  easy  one.  The  five  men, 
with  the  31  dogs  and  19  ponies  (one  had  been  left  behind  at  Vladivostok 
with  suspected  glanders),  sailed  on  the Japanese  ship  to  Kobe,  then —  since 
no  British  steamship  company  would  accept  them  —   on  the  German  ship 
P rin z  W aldem ar,
  to  Sydney,  then  on  the  New  Zealand  steamer  M oan a  to 
W ellington,  and  finally  on  another  New  Zealand  vessel,  the  M aori,  to 
Lyttelton,  where  they  met  the  Terra  N ova.  Trans-shipping  the  ponies  was 
traumatic.  By  the  time  they  reached  New  Zealand,  Bruce  writes,
[w]e  had  become  expert  at  the  business  by  this  time,  but  the  ponies  appeared  to  get 
more  and  more  frightened  on  each  occasion.  We  had  to  blindfold  them  now  before  they 
were  hoisted  out  of  or  into  a  ship,  and  as  I  was  covering  up  the  head  o f  one  in 
Wellington,  he  struggled  so  much  and  threw  his  head  about  so  quickly  that  I  arrived  in 
Lyttelton  next day  with  black  eyes  and  a  swollen  nose.52
His  account  not  only  gives  us  another  vignette  of Anton’s  skill  in  managing 
the  recalcitrant ponies and some  idea  of the  formidable  task  it was  to ship  these 
animals  south;  it  also  reveals,  quite  definitively,  that  Bolotnikov’s  account,  for 
whatever reason,  may on  occasion  be  less  than  completely accurate.  This is per­
haps  not  surprising;  his  meeting  with  Illarion  Omelchenko  took  place  some  35 
years  after Anton’s  death  in  1932.  Bolotnikov does  not tell  us  when  Illarion was 
born.  However,  as  we  shall  see  later,  at  the  time  of the  Terra N ova expedition, 
Anton  was  still  unmarried,  and,  indeed,  seems  likely  to  have  married  before 
around  1920.  This would  make  Illarion,  at  the  most,  around  10  or  11  at  the  time 
o f his  father’s  death.  It is  hardly strange  that —  however vivid  Illarion’s  memoirs 
of  his  father’s  tales  —   some  errors  may  have  crept  into  his  recollections.  The 
same  is  undoubtedly  true  of Anton’s  widow —  who,  we  recall,  remarried some 
three  years  after  his  death,  and  the  elderly  inhabitants  of  Batky.  Indeed,  it  is 
remarkable  that  Illarion  and  his  mother  remembered  any  of  the  unfamiliar 
British  names  at  all,  since  —   as  we  shall  see  later,  they  had  no  written  material 
to  refresh  their  memories.  There  is,  of  course,  the  alternative  possibility,  that 
they  remembered  no  names  at  all,  and  that  the  reference  to  Bruce  was  interpo­
lated  by  Bolotnikov.  But  Scott’s  Last  Expedition  makes  no  reference  at  all  to 
who  bought  the  ponies  and  dogs,  and  Bolotnikov’s  account  of  his  research 
undoubtedly  gives  the  impression  that  he  had  read  no  other  accounts  of  the 
expedition.  Indeed,  had  he  read  these  accounts,  he  would  surely  have  taken 
cognizance  of the  references  in them  to Anton. 51 52
51  Ibid,  p.  271.
52  Ibid,  p.  272.

38
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
The  most valuable  of these  accounts,  as  far  as  our knowledge  of Anton  is 
concerned,  is  The  G reat  W hite South,  written  by  the  expedition’s  photogra­
pher,  Herbert  G.  Ponting.
Ponting  did  not,  it  appears,  keep  a  diary:  instead  he  kept  careful  notes 
about  when  and  where  he  took  his  photographs.  At  the  time  of  the  expedi­
tion,  he  already  had  established  himself  as  a  travel  writer.55  Not  being  a 
diary,  Ponting’s  account  is  somewhat  vague  about  dates,  but  is  vividly  writ­
ten  and  informative.  And  it  is  to  Ponting,  of  course,  that  we  owe  the  four 
pictures  of  Anton  O m elchenko  preserved  in  the  Scott  Polar  Institute’s 
archives.54  Ponting’s  work  contains  some  significant  material  about  Anton. 
He  confirms,  for  example,  Bolotnikov’s  mention  of  his  musical  ability:“it  is 
unfortunate  that  there  was  so  little  musical  talent  amongst  us,  Nelson  could 
play  the  mandolin  by  ear;  Anton,  the  Russian,  occasionally  gave  us  selec­
tions  on  the  balalaika,  and  I  had brought my  b an jo ...”.55
Ponting  also  shows  us  that,  in  spite  of his  unremitting  toil  with  the  ponies, 
Anton  had  other  contributions  to  make  to  the  expedition’s  work.  He  took 
part,  for  example,  in  the  capture  of an  Emperor  penguin  —   a  matter  of  con­
siderable  importance  to  the  scientific  programme  of the  expedition,  since  the 
emperor was  believed  to  be  a  survival  of an  extremely  primitive  form  o f bird- 
life  and  thus  of considerable  importance  for the  understanding  of evolution.56
The  first  of the  three  Emperor  penguins  that  we  saw  at  Cape  Evans  before  the  winter 
darkness  fell,  came  when the  sea  had frozen over  as far out as  the  bergs  that  had  ground­
ed  in  two  hundred  fathoms  off  our  cape.  While  I  was  testing  the  new  ice  —   which  was 
six  inches  thick  near  the  shore  —   I  spied  him  about  a  quarter-of-a-mile  away,  standing 
perfectly  still,  either  asleep  or  lost  in  meditation.  He  looked  a  perfect  giant;  but,  on  get­
ting my  glass  to bear,  I  found  that this  gigantic appearance  was  due  to  his  being  reflected 
in  the  glassy  ice  on  which  he  stood.  Summoning  two  of  the  men,  Anton  and  Clissold, 
who  were  near  at  hand,  1  went  out  to  interview  him.  As  we  approached,  he  came  for­
ward  and  bowed  his  head  in  greeting,  with  'a  grace  a  courtier  might  envy'.  We  clumsily 
returned  this  salutation;  whereupon  his  majesty  made  several  more  genuflexions.  After 
this ceremonial,  he  gazed at us;  and then advancing  to  within two yards,  delivered  a  short 
speech  in  penguin  language,  to  which  we  tried  to  make  appropriate  replies.  It  was  obvi­
ous  that  the  complaisant  bird,  never  having  seen  our  like  before,  took  us  for  fellow  crea­
tures,  and  was  extending  to  us  a  friendly  greeting;  but  he  appeared  to  be  much  puzzled 
at  our speech and  hilarious  demeanour...
...Thinking  he  might  at  any  moment  take  alarm  at  our  stupidity  —   and  stria  instruc­
tions  having  been  given  to  every  member  of the  Expedition  to  capture  any  Emperors  we 
might  meet  with  —   I  treacherously  took  advantage  of  his  trust,  and  slipped  about  his
55  His  book  


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   ...   44


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling