Editorial board slava stetsko


beautiful,  petite,  and  bright  as  a  penny.  Her family  also  had  a  very  interesting


Download 16.82 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet4/44
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi16.82 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   44

1
beautiful,  petite,  and  bright  as  a  penny.  Her family  also  had  a  very  interesting
 
history.  Her  grandfather’s  last  name  on  her  mother’s  side  w as  Lavrutin.  The
 
grandfather  was  very  richt  and  he  had  two  daughters.  The  older  one  was
 
named  lia  Oksana  and  the  younger  w as  called  Mimi  Ruta.  Mimi  was  pretty
 
and  charming  and  was  married  early,  but  Ita  was  m ore  austere  and bookish.
 
Therefore,  although  her  father was  quite  wealthy,  suitors  for Ita  w ere  hard to
 
com e  by.  O ne  day  Ita  spotted  a  very  handsome,  new  young  man  in  town
 
w ho  had  just  started  working  in  her  father’s  paper  b o x  factory.  The  man’s
 
name  was  Milos  tapidos.  Milos  had  flashing  dark  eyes  and  a  winning  smile.
 
Although  a  very  adorable  looking  young  man,  he  was  penniless.  Ita’s  heart
 
was  set  on  him  and  her  father's  money  won  the  day.  She  essentially  bought
 
him  as  a  husband,  and  she  used  to  joke  later  that  he  was  the  handsomest
 
catch  that  money  could  buy.  Milos,  unfortunately,  proved  to  have  no  head  at
 
all  for  business,  and  he  went  through  one  venture  after  another  making  a
 
mess  of  them  all.  It  was  only  because  of  his  wife’s  family’s  wealth  that  he
 
was  able  to  survive.
Milos  and Ita  went  on  to  have  five  children  of whom  my  grandmother Jenny
 
was  one  and  had  inherited  her  father’s  good  looks  and  her  mother’s  brains
 
and  determination  for  a  winning  combination.  Like  her  mother before  her,  she
 
took  one  look  at  the  man  bf her  dreams  (in  this  case  Maier)  and  decided  he
 
was  for  her.  They  w ere  married  in  1905  and  they  decided  to  emigrate  to  thé
 
New World  that  year.  Maieris  original  family  name was  o f Slavic  origin.  I  found
 
out  much  later  that  the  name  was  Polish  and  meant  “from  the  city  o f  birch
 
trees”.  The  name  referred  to  his  family’s  ancestral  origin  from  the  city  o f Brest-
 
Litovsk.  But  after  my  grandparents’  arrival  in  North  America  in  1905,  Maier
 
found  that  his  Polish  name  w as  not  only  unpronounceable,  but  also  totally
 
unspellable  in  English.  He  very  quickly  “Americanised’’  it  and  shortened  it  to
 
Bennett  Not only  did  the  couple leave  Ukraine  to  com e  to  a  new  country,  but
 
they  also discovered  that they  had arrived  in  a  whole  new  technological world
 
as  well.  There  w ere  all  kinds  of  inventions  here  including  the  telephone!
 
phonograph,  automobile,  and  even  the  bicycle  which  were  entirely  new  to
 
their  eyes.  They  w ere  also  shocked  to  find  that  they  had  arrived  in  their  new
 
homeland  in  the  midst  of a  financial  crisis  which  became  known  as  “the  panic
 
of  1907".  So  their  early  years  here  were  economically  very  rough.  They  had
 
gone  from  being quite  wealthy  in  Ukraine,  to being suddenly quite  poor while
 
struggling to  adjustto  a  new language,  culture,  and locale.
Later  on,  after  they  becam e  better  established,  like  many  immigrants,  they
 
tried  to  bring  over  their  relatives  from  the  old  country.  They  w orked  very
 
hard  for  years  to  save  m oney  in  order  to  d o   this,  and  eventually  they
 
established  a  chain  of millinery  stores.  By  this  time,  however,  the  immigration
 
law s  h a d   ch a n g e d   an d   th ere  w e re   n ow   re strictio n s  b ein g   a p p lied   to
 
immigrants  coming  from  Eastern  Europe.  The  only  w ay  they  could  get  their
 
kinfolk  over was  if they  cam e  in  ostensibly  as  servants.  Maier  and Jenny w ere
 
not yet  really  prosperous  enough  in  those  days  to  afford  a  live-in  house  maid
34 
_________ __________________ THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW

HISTORY, 

35
of their  own,  but  for the  sake  of getting Jenny's  parents  into  the  country,  they
 
wrote  on  the  official  documents  that  Ita  and  Milos  were  “being sponsored”  to
 
co m e   in  as  the  b u tler  an d   the  m aid.  M ilos,  alw ays  a g re e a b le   to  any
 
adventurous  scheme  was  willing,  but  Ita,  having  been  rich  and  proud  all  of
 
her  life,  adamantly  refused.  Although  she  very  much  wanted  to  get  out  of
 
communist  Ukraine  to  com e  to  the  golden  land  o f opportunity,  there  was  no
 
way  she  was  ever  going  to  have  any  official  paper  say  she  had  entered  the
 
country  as  a  maid  servant!  Her  sister  Mimi,  w ho  by  this  time  was  a  widow,
 
had  no  scruples  about  saying  anything  that  needed  to  be  said  in  order  to
 
leave  Ukraine.  So she cam e  instead as  “the  Bennett’s  new maid”.
S u b sequently,  the  im m igration   restriction s  w e re   lifted.  At  q u ite  an
 
advanced  age  Ita  and  Milos  cam e  into  the  United  States,  as  a  lady  and
 
gentleman.  Grandpa  Maier  show ed  me  a  wonderful  photograph  carefully
 
preserved  in  a  drawer  which  had  been  taken  in  1932  when  Ita  and  Milos
 
celebrated  their  golden  wedding  anniversary  in  America.  By  that  time,  of
 
course,  they were  in their seventies.  Milos  was still  as handsome  as  ever with
 
snow  white  hair  and  a  stylish,  clipped  white  beard  and  moustache  which  set
 
off  his  dark  twinkling  eyes.  Great-grandma  Ita,  w ho  died  before  I  was  born
 
and  w hose  likeness  I  had  never  seen  before,  w as  w earing  an  elaborate
 
beaded  and  jewelled  gown.  She  had  beautiful  coiffed  white  hair  and  the
 
sternest  expression  of  any  woman  I  had  ever  seen!  Surrounding  this  couple
 
in  the  photo  were  their  five  children  and  many  grandchildren,  all  of  whom
 
my  grandparents Jenny  and  Maier  had  “sponsored”  to  com e  to America.  But
 
one  look  at  great-grandma  Ita’s  face  and  one  knew  she  could  never  have
 
fooled  anyone  into  thinking  she  was  a  maid  servant.  And so  there she  posed,
 
the  matron  who would  never be  a  maid. 

Th e   International  Magazine
for Free Expression
INDEX  O N   C E N S O R S H IP ’S  March  1993  issue  focuses  on  Ukraine  and  Belarus. 
As  well  as  literature  by  Mykola Ryabchuk,  Yevhen  Pashkovsky,  Yury Vynnychuk, 
Oksana  Batyuk,  Serhi  Lavrenyuk,  and  Oleh  Lysheha,  there  is  an  interview  with. 
Serhiy Hrinchuk,  the 
c o m m a n d e r  o f
 the Kiev regional  Command 
o f   th e
  U N S D  and 
religious  advisor  to  the  U N A .  And  Susan  Viets  reports  on  Mustafa  Dzhemilev’s 
efforts to bring  back the Crimean  Tatars from  exile.
Also  in  this  issue:  BELARUS  —   modern  short  stories,  the  language  debate  and  an 
interview with the deputy chief of the Inspectorate for the Protection of State Secrets.
INDEX O N  CENSORSHIP,  March  1993,40 pages, price £2.50 / US$4.30.
Piease send your payment and order to 32 Queen Victoria Street, London EC4N 4SS.

THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
36
Literature
TO  OSNOVYANENKO
Taras Shevchenko
Hryls'ko  Kvitka  0 7 7 8 -1 8 4 3 ),  u n d er  the  nam e  o f Osnovyanenko,  was  one 
o f the  m ajor writers  in  Ukrainian  o f the first h a lf o f the  19th  Century.  H e was 
the author o f a  large  num ber o f prose  works,  dealing  almost  entirely with  the 
life o f Ukrainian peasants —   long  before the peasant  "motif’ becam e popular 
elsewhere in European literature.
The above poem  was written  by  Ukraine’s greatest poet,  Taras Shevchenko,  in 
1839,  at the stari  o f his poetic  career,  and was printed in  1840 in  "Kobzar”,  the 
only volume o f Shevchenko’s poetry to  appear in  his  lifetime.  Although  an  early 
work,  it  contains  m any  motifs  to  w hich  the poet  w ould  retu rn   later,  in 
m editations  on  his poetic  mission,  including  the p refa ce  to  his  epic,  "The 
Haydamaky”.  This translation was specially commissioned as part o f the literary 
celebrations this y ear o f the 150th anniversary o f Osnovyanenko’s death.
The  rapids  pound,  the  moon is  setting,
As  it has set  for ever.
The Sich  gone,  and  he who  ruled 
Is  lost,  and will  come  never,
The  Sich  is  no  more! The  rushes 
Ask  the  Dnipro,  saying:
“Where,  now,  have  our children  gone? 
Where,  now,  are  they  playing?”
Flying  round,  the  lapwing wails 
As  if for  her babes weeping,
Sunlight  glows,  a  wild  wind  blows,
O ’er Cossack steppe-land sweeping.
In  that steppe,  all  round,  the  gravemounds,
Stand there,  mourning,  asking
The  wild wind:  “Where  are  our  lads,
Where  now are  they  masters?
Where  now do they hold  their  banquets, 
Where  do you  still  linger?

Come  back  home to us!  For see,
Now drooping rye-ears  mingle,
Where your steeds you  used  to  pasture, 
Where  rustles  the  esparto,
Where  in  crimson ocean flowed 
The blood  of Pole  and Tatar.
Come  ye  home  to us!”
“They’ll  come  not” 
The  blue sea spoke,  roaring,
They  will  come  not home  again,
For ever they have  fallen!
True  it is,  sea,  true,  blue water,
Such  the fortune deemed them,
Never shall  come  back  those  hoped  for, 
Never come  back  freedom,
Never come  back  Cossackdom,
Nor Hetmans  rise  up ever,
Nevermore shall  our Ukraine 
With  crimson  coats be  covered 
Alt  in tatters,  as an  orphan,
On  Dnipro’s banks now grieving,
Weary,  dreary  lives the  orphan,
None  there  is  to see  her,
Save  the  foeman,  and he smiles.
Smile  then,  evil  foeman,
But not  long,  for all  will  perish,
Yet glory  knows  no waning,
Knows  no waning,  still  proclaiming 
How  the world once  wended,
Whose was  right,  and whose  injustice,
From  whom are we descended.
This  our thought  and  this  our song 
Shall  never  die  nor perish...
This,  good  people,  is  our glory,
Ukraine’s  glory  cherished!
Without gold,  nor precious stones,
Nor in  shrewd words  expressed,
But  resounding,  glory  true,
Like  God's own  gospel  blessed.
Well  then,  father-otaman,
Am  I singing rightly
Well,  if not...  But  that’s enough!
I’ve  no talent  mighty.
What’s  more  this  is Muscovy,
Foreigners  all  round us.

38
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
“What’s  the  matter?”,  you  might say,
"Why  should  that confound  us?”
Here they laugh  to  hear the  psalm 
Which With  tears  flows  over,
Here  they  laugh!  Tis  hard,  dear  father,
To  live  among foemen!
I  too would  have  fought,  maybe,
Had strength been  granted to me,
Would  have sung,  had some small voice, 
But loans  ate  it up  truly.
Indeed,  my father,  my dear friend,
This  is  an  evil  burden,
Lost  in  the  snows,  I  to myself 
Sing  “Meadow,  do not murmur!"
And  that is  all.  But you,  dear father,
As you  know full  truly,
You  have  a  good voice,  and  people 
Pay  you  honour duly.
So sing to them,  my dear friend,
O f Sich  and gravemounds  serried,
When  it was  they  piled each high,
And  whom within  they buried;
Sing  o f olden days,  that wonder,
All  that was,  long ended,
To  it,  then,  that,  willy-nilly,
The  whole  world will  attend  then,
And  learn  what  passed  in  Ukraina,
And  what  for she  perished,
And  what  for the  Cossack glory 
Through  the  whole  world once  flourished. 
To it,  then,  grey eagle,  father!
Let  me weep  and  mourn  then,
And  my  own dear Ukraina 
Let  me see  once more  then; 
le t  me  hear once  more  the  sea,
Playing in  its billows,
Hear  how  a  young girl  sings  “Hryts”, 
Underneath  the  willow.
Let  my  poor heart smile  once  more, 
Though  from  my  own  land  severed.
E’er  in strange earth,  in  a  strange  coffin,
I  lay  me down  for ever.

LITERATURE
39
SPRING  SONGS
Ivan Franko
These
 —  
m ainly  untitled
 —  
poems,  written  over the p erio d   1 880-1883, 
when Franko  was  aged between 2 4   a n d  27,  w ere published by the poet as a 
cycle  in  his  collection  "Z  Vershyn  i  Nyzyn"  (From   Heights  a n d  Depths,  Lviv 
1887).  Written in a deceptively simple style,  a n d  often using the metres,  motifs 
a n d   language  o f folk poetry,  they prove,  on  a  closer  reading,  to  contain  a 
m ordant  substratum   o f political  com m ent,  contrasting  the  beauties  o f the 
season,  conventionally hym ned by poets,  with the political a n d  social realities 
o f the time.
I
Winter was  all  amazed,
Why snow started to thaw,
Why  the  ice was  all  cracked
The  wide  river  o’er?
Winter was  all  amazed 
Why  this weakness she  knew,
From whence  came  this  breeze 
That with  warmth pierced  one  through?
Winter was  all  amazed 
How the  earth grew in  might,
Flooded over with  warmth.
Each  day  stirring to  life?
Winter was  all  amazed 
How the  flowers  dared,  so 
Sweet-scented and small,
To  pierce  through  the  snow?
And  she breathed  on  them with 
Wind  from her icy lips,
And she started  to  throw 
Snow on  them in  great heaps.

40
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
The  flowers all drooped,
Closed  up,  sad,  one  and all,
Then  ihe  grey  storm passed by,
And"they stood straight  and 
tall.
And  exceedingly that 
Against  this small  flower 
Winter was  all  amazed 
That she  could have  no  power.
27.iii.1881
II
Thunder  roars!  And  a  blest season now is  arriving!
All  nature  is  pierced  by  strange trembling and striving,
The  thirsty earth  longs  for the  rains  fructifying,
Above the wind dances,  unbridled  and  flying,
And from  the  west sailing,  the dark  stormclouds  pour —
Thunder roars!
Thunder roars! And  mysterious  tremblings  and strivings 
Pierce  the  people —  maybe  the blest  hour is  arriving... 
Millions  await  a  chance  happy  and wondrous,
The  clouds  are  but  shadows  of future  abundance,
That,  like  fair springtime,  mankind  will  restore...
Thunder roars.
15.  v.1881
IV
And  now  the  bright sun at  its  toil 
O f spring over  meadows  is glowing,
And  now on  fields’  wide-spreading soil,
Man’s sweat  in  its  rivers  is  flowing.
Purely  and  gently once  more 
Flows the  river with  silver  fish gleaming, 
Again  on  the bare  common,  poor 
Cattle graze,  wandering leanly.
The woodland  resounds with  birds’ song, 
Near the graveyard —  the  cuckoo’s  inflection; 
And  in  his  coach,  bowling along,
The  taxman  goes  round on collection.
1. v.1881

LITERATURE
VI
Swiftly spread your branches,  willow, 
Oak-grove,  greenly  thriving!
Nature  that has  long been  dead 
Once  more  is  reviving;
Is  reviving,  sundering
The bonds  and  chains  of winter,
With  fresh  vigour is renewed,
And with fresh hope unstinted.
Grow once  more green,  native  field, 
Grow,  Ukrainian  tillage,
Rise  up,  shoot with ears,  and  ripen 
Happy to  fulfilment!
Every  good seed may  you  rear,
Safe  forever keep it,
May good service  from your fruit 
Benefit the  people.
1880
IX
In  the  orchard now,  the  nightingale still  sings,
A beloved  ditty  to  the  fair young spring,
Still  it  twitters  as  of old  it  twittered  long,
And it greets  the  lovely spring with  welcome song.
But the  orchard is  not now as  in  past days,
When  the  village  rang with  song one eve  in May, 
Young girls  came  along the  road like swarming bees, 
Nightingale  was  fluting  in  the  cherry trees,
Now it  is  not as  it was.  Now in  the gloom 
Groups  o f girls  no  longer through  the  village  roam, 
Maidens’ song  no  longer  floats  through  all  the  street, 
With  the  songster in  the  cherry  to  compete.
Now,  worn  out  from  work,  they  hasten  on  their  way, 
And their limbs  ache sorely  as  if hacked  away.
It would  not  mock  the  poor lasses,  this sweet song,
If they could  rest  after toiling  all  day  long.

4 2  
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
Hard it is  now for the  nightingale  to sing,
Hard to greet  now,  though  ’tis  lovely,  the sweet spring, 
To  proclainythe joy  of nature  to  the world,
As  it were  to  human woe  an  insult  hurled.
And  it grieves  its  former  rivals,  now grown  mute, 
Whose sweet song o f old once mingled  with its  flute. 
What  awaits  them? Loveless  marriage,  babes untold,
A bad husband,  and his  mother who’s  a  scold.
25.iv.1881
X
Spring,  ah  how  long waiting for the we  linger,
Why dost  thou  not come,  Spring,  dearest and best?
Why  in  thy  place,  in  a  poor house  to mingle,
Dost thou  send  ruin  and  loss,  cold and hunger,
To  be  our guests?
It  is  already May!  May,  well-beloved,
Why dost  thou  come  into the world as  if dead?
It is  empty  and dead in  the  field,  in  the grove  now,
Only the  dull  leaden  storm-clouds  lie over
The  whole  sky-spread.
Through  the  poor homesteads go groans  and  complaining, 
Children  are dying,  throats swollen and sore,
No wisp  of hay  in  the  ricks still  remaining,
Cattle  die,  and,  through  the  broad valleys straining,
The  waters  roar.
“It  is the  end!",  people whisper,  “for rarely 
Troubles  come singly.  This either must bring 
Plague,  or the  Poles will take  over (God spare us!)
Such  are  the  greetings  the villagers bear thee,
This year,  O spring.
6 v. 1883

LITERATURE
43
XV
Vivere Memento
Spring,  what is  this wonder you 
In  my breast are  making?
Do you  call the  heart to new 
Life  from death  to waken?
Yesterday,  like  Lazarus,  I,
In woe’s  coffin pining,
Rotted,  what new star on  high 
Is  this  for me shining?
A strange  voice  calls,  beckoning 
Me —  here,  there,  now,  then,  to 
“Rise,  rouse up,  awakening,
Vivere memento!"
Warm  wind,  brother truly mine,
Is it your voice speaking?
Or upon  the  hill’s  bright  shine 
Is  the  oak-tree  creaking?
Is  it,  grass,  your whispered breath, 
Gently thus expressed now,
You  that through  the  ice  of death 
To the  light  have  pressed  now?
Was  it your soft murmur,  say,
River,  silver blent so,
Washed  my weariness  away?
Vivere memento!
AH  round I  hear that dear call,
Life’s strong clarion shouting...
Breezes,  spring,  I love you  all,
Rivers,  stormclouds,  mountains!
People,  people,  I  am your 
Brother,  for you  gladly 
I  would live,  my blood I'd  pour 
To wash away your sadness.
What blood cannot  wash  out,  w ell  give 
To  the  fire,  present so!
But we  battle  while  we  live...
Vivere memento!
14.x. 1883

TH E UKRAINIAN REVIEW
mêmk'S
News  From Ukraine
Russian Oil  Supplies 
Still  Low
KYIV,  D ecem b er  12  -—   Russia  has
 
supplied  Ukraine  with  only  a  third  of
 
the  agreed   am ount  o f  oil  o ver  the
 
last  three  months  o f  1992.  Mykola
 
P o p o v y ch ,  sp o k esm an   fo r  th e  oil
 
concern  Ukrneftegas,  said  Ukraine’s
 
largest  refinery  at  Lisichansk  w as
 
only  w orking  at  25  p er  cen t  o f  its
 
capacity.
ChPrtioiifl
KYIV,  D e c e m b e r  13  —   W o rk ers
 
re sta rte d   a  se c o n d   re a c to r  at  the
 
d am aged  C hornobyl  n u clear  plant
 
calculating  that  Ukraine’s  n eed  for
 
energy  outweighs  the  danger  of  this
 
action. 

Zlenko "to  K o zyra v::
Threats Are Not  Funny  .
STOCKHOLM  -i-  The  government  of
 
Ukraine  did  not  find  Russian  Foreign
 
Minister  Andrei  Kozyrev’s  threatening,
 
Cold War jokes to be  funny.
According  to  a   statement  released
 
b y   th e   E m b a ssy   o f  U k ra in e   in
 
Washington,  D.C.,  Ukrainian  Foreign
 
Minister  Anatoliy  Zlenko,  responding
 


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   44


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling