Editorial board slava stetsko


particularly  interested  in  guarantees


Download 16.82 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet6/44
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi16.82 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   44
particularly  interested  in  guarantees
 
from   n u clear  states.  I f   this  is
 
subsequently  confirm ed  by  the  UN
Security  C ouncil,  w e  have  n o
 
objections”.
Tarasiuk  rep eated   the  statem ent
 
he  made  on  arrival  from  Washington
 
that  guarantees  essentially  m eant  a
 
co m m itm e n t  n ot  to  u se  fo rc e   o r
 
th re a te n   to   d o   so .  H e  a lso   sa id
 
Ukraine  was  still  lobbying  to  secure
 
th e  g u aran tees  b efo re  p arliam en t
 
ratified the  pact
However,  Oleksander  Tarasenko,
 
a  se n io r  m em b er  o f  p a rlia m e n t’s
 
d efen ce  com m ission,  said  he  had
 
little  c o n fid e n c e   in  T a ra s iu k ’s
 
assurances.  “Tarasiuk  appears  rather
 
o p tim istic  a fte r  his  trip .  M ore
 
a tte n tio n   sh o u ld   b e  p aid   to  th e
 
interests  o f  Ukraine  rather  than  to
 
w h at  o n e   p e rs o n   o r  a n o th e r  is
 
saying”,  he  said.  “We  have  discussed
 
this  q u e stio n   in fo rm a lly   in  the
 
co m m issio n   an d   ca m e   to  th e
 
conclusion  that  no  one  will  in  fact
 
provide us  with  security guarantees".
T a ra se n k o   is  o n e  o f  a b o u t  7 0
 
m e m b e rs  re p re s e n tin g   farm in g
 
interests  and  embodies  some  o f  the
 
m o re  co n se rv a tiv e   v ie w p o in ts  in
 
U k ra in e ’s  p a rlia m e n t. 
H e  said
 
parliam ent  had  put  ratification  of
 
START-1  and  the  Non-Proliferation
 
Treaty  at  the  top  o f  its  legislative
 
a g e n d a   and  w o u ld   d e b a te   b o th
 
d o c u m e n ts  so o n   a fte r  d e p u tie s
 
re su m e d   w ork   in  m id -Ja n u a ry .
 
O ther  deputies  have  said  a  heavy
 
parliamentary  agenda  dominated  by
 
e c o n o m ic   re fo rm   a  y e a r  a fte r
 
independence  from  M oscow  would
 
push  the  ratification   d eb ate  b ack
 
until  February  or  March.
US 
o fficials 
m ain tain  
th a t
 
A m erican   a s s is ta n c e   h in g es  on
 
Ukraine’s  ratification o f START-1.

NEWS  FROM UKRAINE
The:  Ukrainian  p arliam en t  will
 
discuss  ratifying  the  original  Strategic
 
Arms  R eduction  Treaty  w hen   it
 
reconvenes  in  mid-January.  Also,  the
 
defence  ministers  of  the  four  former
 
Soviet  states  with  nuclear  weapons  —
 
Russia,  Kazakhstan,  U kraine  and
 
Belarus  —   will  meet  on January  21  to
 
d iscu ss 
co n trol 
o v e r 
the
 
Commonwealth  of Independent  States^
 
nuclear  arsenal,  Interfax.  Presidents
 
Kravchuk  and  Yeltsin  w ere  to  meet
 
separately on January  15.
The  m eetin g  on  the  ev e  o f  the
 
January  22  summit  of  CIS  heads  of
 
state  in  the  Belarus  capital  Minsk
 
was  largely  prom pted  by  Ukraine’s
 
d e la y   in  ratifyin g   th e   START-1
 
a c c o rd ,  a  sp o k esm an   for  the  CIS
 
C om b in ed   F o rc e s  C om m and   told
 
Interfax.  The  ratification  o f  START-1
 
by  the  U nited  States  and  all  four
 
nuclear-armed  CIS  states  is  necessary
 
fo r  th e  im p le m e n ta tio n   o f  the
 
START-2  accord  recently  negotiated
 
b y  P resid en t  Bush  and  P resid en t
 
Borys  Yeltsin.  START-2,  which  will
 
sla sh   US  a n d   R u ssian   n u cle a r
 
arsenals  by  two-thirds,  is  inextricably
 
linked  to  START-1.
Only  Ukraine  and  Belarus  have  not
 
yet  ratified  START-1,  although  Belarus
 
w as  e x p e c te d   to  e n d o rse   it  soon.
 
Ukraine  originally  agreed  to  transfer
 
all  its  nuclear  weapons  to  Russia  for
 
destruction,  ratify  the  START-1  accord
 
and  become  a  non-nuclear  state.  But,
 
in  recent  months,  Kyiv  has  hesitated
 
rep eated ly   Over  giving  up  its  176
 
strategic  multi-warhead  missiles,  and
 
cau sed   anxiety  in  W ashington  and
 
M oscow   by  attaching  conditions  to
 
ratifying  START-1.  Several  Ukrainian
 
legislators  even  suggested  Ukraine
57
should  keep  its  missiles  to  boost  the
 
n ew ly 
in d e p e n d e n t 
re p u b lic’s
 
in te rn a tio n a l  clo u t.  C u rren tly   all
 
strategic  nuclear missiles  in  the  former
 
Soviet  Union  are  under  CIS  central
 
control.. 

Russia’s Oil Cuts to 
Ukraine Pose Threat 
to  Economy
KYIV  —   Russia  will  only  guarantee
 
to  supply  Ukraine  with  one-sixth  of
 
the  45  million  tons  o f oil  it  needs  for
 
1 9 9 3 ,  th re a te n in g   th e   U k rain ian
 
e co n o m y ,  Prim e  M inister  L eonid
 
Kuchma  said  on  Monday, January  11.
He  told  Ukrinform  new s  agency
 
th at  R u ssian   r e p re s e n ta tiv e s   at
 
w e e k e n d   in terg ov ern m en tal  talks
 
had  sa id   th e y   co u ld   g u a r a n te e
 
delivery  of  only  7 .5  million  tons.  At
 
the  most  they  could  supply  only  15
 
million tons.
“This  m eans  the  collapse  o f  Our
 
econom y”,  Ukrinform  quoted  him  as
 
tellin g  
lo c a l 
g o v e rn m e n t
 
representatives.
First  Deputy  Prime  Minister  Ihor
 
Yukhnovskyi  told  a news  conference
 
this  w e e k   th at  U k ra in e ,  h e a v ily
 
d e p e n d e n t  on  R ussia  fo r  e n e rg y
 
supplies,  needed  a  bare  minimum  of
 
36  million  tons  of  oil  in  1993,  down
 
from  about 40  million  tons  in  1992.
K u ch m a  w as  d u e  to  a rriv e   in
 
Moscow  on January  14  for  talks  with
 
his  R u ssian   c o u n te rp a rt  V iktor
 
C h ern om yrd in ,  a  day  a h ead   o f   a
 
planned  meeting  between  Presidents
 
Boris  Yeltsin  and  Leonid Kravchuk.
M ean w h ile,  U k ra in e ’s  s e c o n d
 
largest oil  refinery  has  resumed  work
 
after  being  virtually  Idle  for  several

58
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
weeks,  Ukrainian  radio  reported  on
 
Saturday.
T h e  ra d io   said   th e  refin ery
 
Kremenchuk  in  central  Ukraine  was
 
receiving  between  25,000  and  29,(XX)
 
tons  of  oil  daily.  In  accordance  with
 
orders  from  local  authorities,  7 5   per
 
ce n t  o f  the  refin ed   oil  w as  b eing
 
distributed  to  the  farming  sector  with
 
th e  
re m a in d e r 
for 
sc h o o ls ,
 
kindergartens  and  emergency  services
 
freq u en tly  
sh o rt 
o f 
su p p lies.
 
Breakdowns  in  shipments  from  Russia
 
have  disrupted  work  at  Ukraine’s  five
 
refineries  in  recent weeks.
The  cou n try’s  largest  refinery  at
 
lisichansk,  with  an  annual  capacity
 
of 22  million  tons,  was  shut briefly  in
 
December.  Ensuring  supplies  o f  oil
 
will  b e   at  th e   c e n tr e   o f  talk s  in
 
M oscow  betw een  Presidents  Leonid
 
Kravchuk  and  Boris  Yeltsin.
Ukraine needs some  40  million  tons
 
annually  and  Russia  can  ship  only
 
about  15  million.  Ukraine’s  oil  sector
 
has  been  in  turmoil  over  allegations
 
that  sen ior  officials  diverted  large
 
am ounts  abroad  for  personal  gain.
 
U k rain ian   rad io   said   K rav ch u k ’s
 
representatives  have  been  conducting
 
rig o ro u s  c h e c k s  at  refin eries  to
 
prevent further illegal  sales.
Also,  in  Moscow,  provisional  data
 
sh o w s  that  Russia  e x p o rte d   6 6 .2
 
million  tons  (1 .3 2   million  barrels  a
 
d ay)  o f  oil  in  1992,  up  from  54.1
 
m illion  (1 .0 8   m illion)  in  1 9 9 1 ,  an
 
official  at  the  fuel  and  energy  ministry
 
said  Former Soviet  republics  complain
 
that Russia  is  not  supplying  them  with
 
sufficient  fuel  and  many  republics,
 
in clu d in g   U kraine,  A rm enia  and
 
Lithuania,  su ffered   se v e re   fuel
 
shortages during  1992. 
*
Kravchuk’s Visit  Builds 
Bridges to  Israel
’JERUSALEM  —   Ukrainian  President
 
Leonid  Kravchuk  arrived  in  Israel  on
 
Monday, January  11.
K ravchuk,  a cco m p a n ie d   by  the
 
Ukrainian  foreign  minister  and  six
 
other  Cabinet  members,  was  greeted
 
in  an  official  state  reception,  kicking
 
o ff  his  tw o -d ay   visit  d esig n ed   to
 
stre n g th e n   ties  b e tw e e n   the  n ew
 
republic  and  Israel.
Th e  p u rp o se   o f  th e   trip  is  “to
 
establish  new  relations  betw een  an
 
independent  Ukraine  and  m od ern
 
Is ra e l”,  Israeli  F o re ig n   M inister
 
Shimon  Peres  said  after  lunch  with
 
K ravchuk.  “We  co n sid e r  it  a  very
 
im p o rta n t  v isit  b e c a u s e   h e  is
 
p re sid e n t  o f  a  v e ry   im p o rta n t
 
country”.
Welcoming  Kravchuk  at  Tel  Aviv
 
a irp ort.  F o reig n   M inister  Shim on
 
Peres  said  the  visit  “is  particularly
 
important  because  w e  are  mutually
 
in te re s te d   in  s tre n g th e n in g   o u r
 
cultural  and econom ic  relations”.
Kravchuk  also  met  Prime  Minister
 
Yitzhak  Rabin.  Israel  and  Ukraine
 
la u n c h e d  
d ip lo m a tic 
tie s 
in
 
December  1991.  Kravchuk  is  the  first
 
leader  of  a  m em ber  o f  the  CIS  to
 
visit  Israel
P e re s 
a lso  
d o w n p la y e d  
the
 
buildup  of  nuclear  arms  in  Ukraine,
 
saying  that  Kravchuk’s  governm ent
 
has  indicated  a  desire  to  sign  the
 
Strtnegic  Arm s  R ed u ctio n   T reaty,
 
which  has  already b een  endorsed  by
 
19  countries.
On  the  seco n d   day  of  his  visit,
 
Kravchuk  toured  the  Yad  Vashem
 
Holocaust  Museum  with  a  group  of

NEWS FROM UKRAINE
59
Ukrainians  honoured  as  “Righteous
 
o f  the  N ations”  —   n on -Jew s  w ho
 
sa v e d   Je w is h   liv es  d u rin g  the
 
H olocau st.  K ravchuk  w as  also  to
 
a tte n d   th e 
d e d ic a tio n   o f  the
 
Ukrainian  em bassy  in  Tel  Aviv  on
 
Tuesday.  An  Israeli  am bassador  to
 
U kraine,  rep lacin g  the  tem p orary
 
charge  d’affaires,  is  expected  to  be
 
announced soon.
Reuter  said  K ravchuk’s  trip  was
 
in ten d ed   to  b a la n ce   M iddle  E ast
 
policy  and  secure  good  ties  with  a
 
country,  which  is  hom e  to  6 00,000
 
former  Soviet  Jews,  a  third  of  them
 
from  Ukraine.
“We  are  doing  everything  to  put
 
an  end  to  the  myth  that  Ukrainians
 
a re   a n ti-S e m ite s ”,  sa id   V iktor
 
N ah aich u k ,  h e a d   o f  th e  fo reig n
 
ministry’s  Middle  East  section.  “We
 
believe  there  is  m ore  to  unite  us
 
than  divide  us".
Relations  between  Ukrainians  and
 
Je w s ,  w h o   n o w   n u m b e r  ab o u t
 
5 0 0 ,0 0 0   in  th e   fo rm e r  S oviet
 
republic,  are  on  the  w hole  g oo d ,
 
Reuter said. 

Ukrainian  PM Convinced 
By Polish  Reform Path
KYIV, January  12  —   Ukrainian  Prime
 
Minister  Leonid  Kuchma  said  talks
 
with  his  Polish  co u n te rp a rt  h ave
 
persuaded  him  that  Warsaw's  shock
 
th e ra p y   a p p ro a c h   to  re fo rm   w as
 
correct.  Since  com ing  to  p ow er  in
 
O cto b e r,  K uchm a  has  rep eated ly
 
b a ck e d   w hat  h e  says  a re   gradual
 
re fo rm s  to  re o rie n t  U k ra in e ’s
 
econom y  on  market  principles  after
 
se v e n  
d e c a d e s   o f  C om m u n ist
 
co m m an d   eco n o m ics.  These  have
included  steep   price  increases  last
 
m onth  fo r  staple  goods,  like  milk
 
and  b read ,  public  transport,  rents
 
and  public services. 

Ukraine 
May 
Seek
Higher 
Oil 
Wages
KYIV,  Jan u ary  12  —   Ukraine  m ay
 
ask  Russia  to  pay  world  salary  levels
 
to  2 0 0 ,0 0 0   U k rain ian   w o rk e rs  in
 
Russian  oil  fields  if  M oscow  insists
 
on   p a y m e n t  for  its  oil  at  w o rld
 
p rice s.  U k rain e  an d   R ussia  h ave
 
been locked  in  a  protracted row over
 
oil  p rice s  and  su p p lies  follow ing
 
large  increases  in  the  price  paid  for
 
Russian  oil.  The  issue  is  likely  to
 
figure  prominently  in  talks  this  week
 
b etw een  the  two  co u n tries’  prime
 
ministers  and  their  presidents  Leonid
 
Kravchuk  and  Boris  Yeltsin. 

Hew 
Chernobyl 
Fire 
Underscores 
Problems
KYIV,  January  13  —   Fire  broke  out
 
overnight  at  the  Chornobyl  nuclear
 
p ow er  station,  site  o f  the  w orld ’s
 
w orst  n u clear  accident,  but  it  was
 
quickly  extinguished  and  there  was
 
no  radiation  danger.  The  fire  was  the
 
latest  of dozens  of incidents plaguing
 
Ukraine’s  atomic  industry. 

Ukraine to Retaliate  if 
Russia  Raises  Fuel 
Prices
KYIV,  Jan u ary   13  —   U kraine  will
 
retaliate  against  Russian  m oves  to
 
charge  world  prices  for  oil  and  gas
 
by  raisin g   fe e s  to  tra n sp o rt  th e
 
co m m o d itie s  a c r o s s   its  te rrito ry .

60
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
“Now  that Russia  has  raised  its  prices
 
for  oil,  w e  will  also  start  to   raise
 
c h a rg e s   fo r  rail,  s e a   an d   o t h e t ,
 
tra n sp o rt”,  Prim e  M inister  Leonid
 
K uchm a  said.  "Everything  here  is
 
mutually interdependent”. 

Industrialists Want  End 
to  Impasse
M OSCOW ,  Ja n u a ry   14  —   t h e
 
powerful  industrialist  blocs  of  Russia
 
and  U k rain e  u rg ed   th eir  political
 
le a d e rs   to  s to p   th e ir  e c o n o m ic
 
standoff  turning  into  an  open  trade
 
w ar.  In  a  Join t  a p p e a l,  industrial
 
leaders  of  the  two  states  called  on
 
their presidents  to  take  decisive  steps
 
to  e n d   a  c o n fro n ta tio n   th at  h as
 
frozen  financial  transactions  between
 
them   and  plunged  Ukraine  into  an
 
energy crisis. 

Russian,  Ukrainian 
Premiers  Fail .to  Resolve 
Disputes:,
MOSCOW,  January  14  —   The  Prime
 
Ministers  of  Russia  and  Ukraine  met
 
to  deal  with  som e  o f  the  disputes
 
souring  relations  betw een  the  two
 
states,  but  failed  to  break  a  deadlock
 
o v e r  th e   S oviet  d eb t  an d   e n e - g /
 
prices.  New  Russian  Premier  Viktor
 
C h e rn o m y rd in  
m et 
w ith  
his
 
U k rain ian  
c o u n te rp a rt 
L e o n i:'
 
Kuchma  for  talks  which  ended  in  the
 
sig n in g   o f  only  five  o f  U --  ten
 
eco n om ic  agreem ents  before
 
Ukraine  is  still  refusing  to  let  A
l
..
 
tak e  o v e r  its  sh are  o f  the  form er
 
Soviet  U nion’s  $ 8 0   billion  foreign
 
debt  in  exchange  for  Ukraine’s  share
 
o f the  USSR’s  financial  assets. 

Presidents Start  Summit 
Talks
MOSCOW,  Ja n u a ry  
15  —   The
 
presidents  of  Russia  and  Ukraine  met
 
in  Moscow  to  shore  up  relations  that
 
have  b een   strained  by  a  ran ge  of
 
disputes.  Boris  Yeltsin  and  Leonid
 
K ravchuk  w ere  due  to  d iscu ss
 
differences  over  oil  and  gas  supplies
 
and  prices,  repayment  of  the  former
 
Soviet  Union’s  foreign  debt.  Ukrainian
 
ratification  of  the  START-1  nuclear
 
arms  reduction  agreement may  also be
 
on  the  summit’s agenda. 

Ukraine Gains  Border  v. 
Guarantee  From Russia
MOSCOW,  Jan u ary   15  —   Ukraine
 
won  a  guarantee  from  Russia  of  the
 
inviolability  of  its  borders,  one  o f
 
Kyiv’s  conditions  for  the  ratification
of  nuclear  cutback  agreements  with
 
the  United  States.  At  a  summ it  in
 
Moscow.  President  Yellsir 
'so  met
 
a n o th e r  item and  h old in  
ip  the
 
.-Valegic  Arms  Kcduclioi 
eaties
 
(START),  giving  Kyiv  co u n terp art
 
Leonid  Kravchuk  a  guarantee  that
 
Russia  w ou ld   co m e   to   U k ra in e ’s
 
defence  against  any  nuclear  attack.  ■
Slack Sea  Fleet 
C  ef  i  ..ned
MC.-.'.OW.  J  nuarv 
..air.e
:md 
A
ussis 
lpom- 
■; 
.»•miral 
'.dua.e 
Bal'"‘  as 
com
  ■
 
-r 
me 
spiA-.i  BL.Ct  Sea 
Ah'i :.  56,
.  c a d   o '   the  n aval  i. 
H.r  ■  the
 
Kt- -.sia-  General  Staff 
Jemy  ;,kes
 
over  from  Admiral  Igor  Kata^nov..-
 
U k rain e  h ad   a c c u s e d   K asatonov,
 
who  quit in  December,  o f adopting  a
 
pro-Moscow line. 


NEWS  FROM  UKRAINE
Creditors Snub Ukraine 
Debt  Deal  Hopes
MOSCOW,  Ja n u a ry   1
6
  —   Foreign
 
c re d ito rs   b a c k e d   R u ssia  o v e r  an
 
argum ent  with  Ukraine  on  how   to
 
repay  ab ou t  $80  billion  o f  foreign
 
debts  o f  the  form er  Soviet  Union.
 
Russia  wants  to  repay  the  debts  on
 
b e h a lf  o f  all  o th e r  fo rm e r  Soviet
 
re p u b lics,  b u t  U k rain e  insists  on
 
handling  its  ow n  share  separately.
 
N egotiators  from . the  Paris  Club  o f
 
c r e d ito r  n atio n s  an d   th e   L on d o n
 
Club  o f  com m ercial  creditor  banks
 
h ad   found  th e  U krainian  position
 
unacceptable  at  talks  in  Moscow. 

Russians. Demand 
Return of Crimea
M OSCOW   —   A fter  a  p ro-R u ssian
 
d em onstration   in  C rim ea,  Russian
le g is la to rs   h e re   d is cu s sin g   th e
 
d is p u te d   C rim ean   P e n in su la   in
 
Parliament  said  on  January  18  that
 
R u ssia  h ad   a  righ t  to   u se   th e
 
Ukrainian-controlled  Crimean  port  of
 
Sevastopol  as  the  base  for  the  Black
 
Sea  Fleet.
“We  must  examine  the  options  for
 
defining  Sevastopol’s  status  as  the
 
base  o f the  Russian  Black  Sea  Fleet”,
 
c o n s e r v a tiv e   la w m a k e r  Y e v g e n y
 
Pudovkin  said.
Pudovkin  spoke  to  reporters  after
 
clo se d   p arliam en tary  h earin g s  on
 
Crimea.
R ussian  ch au vin ists  point  to  a
 
d o cu m e n t 
from  
1 9 4 8  
turning
 
Sevastopol  into a  distinct administrative
 
and  economic  unit  directly  controlled
 
by  M oscow   and  stress  that  the  port
 
w as  fin an ced   out  o f  the  Russian
61
budget  from  1948 until  1968.  They  say
 
existing legislation gives  Russia  a  claim
 
to  the port,  which  they want  as  a  base
 
for their Black Sea naval  contingent
Ukrainian Actions
They  also  say  the  Ukrainian  Defence
 
Ministry  is  gradually  taking  over  the
 
fleet’s  on-shbre  facilities  in  violation
 
o f  agreem ents  forbidding  unilateral
 
actions  by  either  side  until  the  fleet’s
 
final  status  is  determined.
The  chauvinists  at  the  hearings  on
 
Crimea  insisted Russia  call  on  Kyiv to
 
lift  a  referen d u m   ban  in  o rd er  to
 
a llo w   th e   p e n in su la   to   d e c id e
 
whether  it  wants  to  stay  in  Ukraine,
 
secede,  or merge  with  Russia.
“R u ssia  w o u ld   lik e  to   h a v e
 
confederative  relations  with  Ukraine
 
an d  
th e  
C rim e a n  
R e p u b lic ”,
 
Pudovkin  said.  “We  also  want  Kyiv
 
to   lift  its  b a n   o n   a  C rim ean
 
referendum,  which  is  a  violation  o f
 
human  rights”.
T h e 
C o n g re ss 
o f 
P e o p l e ’s
 
D e p u tie s,  R u ssia ’s  c o n s e rv a tiv e -
 
dominated  suprem e  legislature,  last
 
m o n th   v o te d   to   e x a m in e  
all
 
le g isla tio n  
o n  
th e  
sta tu s 
of
 
S e v a s to p o l  a n d   h o ld   a  s p e c ia l
 
session  on  the  issue.
Angry Reaction
Ukrainian  lawmakers  reacted  angrily  to
 
the  decision,  and  in  a  strongly-worded
 
statem en t  called   it  “undisguised
 
interference  in  Ukraine’s  internal  affaire”
 
and  an  en croachm ent  on  U kraine’s
 
territorial  integrity  and  sovereignty.
 
About  5,000  demonstrators,  many  of
 
them pensioners,  on January  17 shouted
 
pro-Russian  slogans  in  the  Crimean

THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
6 2
Black  Sea  Fleet  port  of  Sevastopol  on
 
Sunday  and  called  for  the  secession
 
from   in d ep en d en t  Ukraine.  Local
 
journalists,  som e  of  w hom   said  the'
 
d em onstration   num bered  1 0 ,0 0 0
 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   44


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling