Editorial board slava stetsko


participants,  said the demonstration was


Download 16.82 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet7/44
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi16.82 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   44
participants,  said the demonstration was
 
the largest of a series. 

Russian Lawmakers 
Raise Claim to Naval Port
MOSCOW,  Ja n u a ry   1 8   —   Russian
 
legislators  discussing  the  disputed
 
Crimean  Peninsula  in  Parliament  said
 
R u ssia  h a d   a  rig h t  to   u se   the
 
Ukrainian-controlled  Crimean  pon  of
 
Sevastopol  as  the  base  for  the  Black
 
S ea  F le e t.  T h e  a p p e a l  fo r  dual
 
control  o f the  naval  base  threatens  m
 
sou r  relations  b etw een  Russia  and
 
Ukraine,  already  strained  by  conflicts
 
over  the  division  o f  the  Black  Sea
 
Fleet. 

Ukraine to  Pay  Sts Share
of Foreign  Debt
KYIV —  Despite  opposition  from  the
 
P a ris  C lub,  U k rain e  h as  re a c h e d
 
agreement  with  Russia  on January  18
 
to  re p a y   its  sh a re   o f  the  form e ■■
 
Soviet  foreign  debt  separately,  senior
 
government  officials  said.
The  officials  said  the  two  forme:
 
Soviet  republics  signed  a  prniocoi
 
during  talks  in  Moscow  on  SaiwJ.ay
 
under  which  Ukraine  undertook  о
 
repay  a  16.37  per  cent  share  of debts
 
estimated  at about  $80  billion.
“B u t  W e ste rn   cre d ito rs   h ave
 
already  expressed  reservations  at  the
 
a g re e m e n t  as  th e y   a re   u n ce rta in
 
about  Ukraine’s  ability  to  pay",  said
 
one  official.
R u ssian   o fficia ls  an d   W e ste rn
 
creditors  could  not  confirm  whether
 
any  agreem ent  had  b een   reached .
 
Russian  officials  said  creditors,  Russia
 
and  Ukraine  planned  to  issue  a  joint
 
statement  on  the  issue  on  Tuesday.
 
Russian  Deputy  Prime  Minister  Boris
 
Fyodorov  said  at  a  news  conference
 
that  questions  on  dividing  up  debt
 
would  be  answered  by  Russia’s  chief
 
ud.it  negotiator  Alexander  Shokhin  at
 
u  news  conference  of  iris  own  after
 
th e  re le a s e   o f  the  s ta te m e n t.
 
Fyodorov  declined  to  com m ent  on
 
the  outcome  of  the  w eekend  talks,
 
which  also  involved  senior  officials
 
from  the  Paris  Club  of creditor  states
 
and  the  Loudon  (Hub  of  eonm ertial
 
banks.
Th e  Kyiv  o fficials  sa id   the
 
agreement  with  Russia  also  provided
 
for  Ukraine  to  receive  a  share  of the
 
assets  of  the  form er  Soviet  Union.
 
The  assets  include  embassy  premises
 
ao ro a d   anti  reserv es  cT  j  aid  and
 
diam onds,  while  Ukraine  tas  also
 
said  it  has  a  claim   on  a  h are  of
 
":,c  "’-ic.s  built  ab road   ■  it  ■  Soviet
 
help.  Officials  provided  no  details  on
 
whether  ilk.  nvo  side«  bad  agreed  on
 
how  to  divide  the  asset-
Russia  has  agreed a  so-called  zero-
 
option  deal  with  other  former  Soviet
 
re p u b lics 
excluding 
Jk ra in e
w h e re b y  
th e  
o th e r 
s ta te s
rel: 
ibh ed   their  c l e m   ;>  >  Soviet
assets  and  Russia  agr .  d  c  pay  all
 
debts  on  their  behalf. 
3t  a  similar
 
deal  with  Ukraine  has  ?ti  l e i   amid
 
.  wmv.vm.g  ab ou t  the 
V; 
3
  o f  th e
 
assets,  which  Ukraine  s  -s  could  be
 
worth  ns ore  than  m e  e  b 
Russia
 
it  will  take  tin.,.,  r   -  ilue  the
 
assets  properly.

NEWS FROM UKRAINE
O le k s a n d e r 
S h a ro v , 
d e p u ty
 
chairman  o f Ukraine’s  national  bank,
 
estimated  Ukraine’s  share  o f the  debt
 
at  $11.4  billion.  Russia  is  anxious  to
 
reschedule  as  soon  as  a  deal  can  be
 
reached with  creditors.
But  Kyiv  officials  have  not  said
 
how  they  plan  to  divide  up the  debts
 
or  how   paym ents  are  to  be  made.
 
S om e  a ck n o w le d g e   th at  W estern
 
creditors  are  n ot  happy  about  the
 
arran g em en t.  U krainian  estim ates
 
show   that  half the  debt  is  payable  to
 
o fficia l  c r e d ito rs   an d   h a lf  to
 
commercial  banks.
.  Creditors  have  so  far  been  wary  of
 
dividing  up  debts  built  up  by  the  old
 
Soviet  Union,  arguing  it  is  hard  to
 
d ivide  up  d eb ts  d e n o m in a te d   in
 
d ifferen t  cu rre n cie s  and  p aying
 
different  interest  rates.  The  maturity  of
 
d eb ts  a lso   v arie s  g re a tly .  Kyiv
 
m in isters  h ave  said  U kraine  paid
 
Western  creditors  about  $10  million  in
 
1992,  a  small  part  of its obligations.
Kyiv  officials  believe  Ukraine  can
 
probably  claim  about  $2  billion  in
 
p ro p e rty .  T h ey   say  th e  n ew   deal
 
would  allow  them  to  take  control  of
 
the  former  Soviet  republic’s  financial
 
affairs. 

Kravchuk  Balks Signing 
CIS  Charter; Warns 
Against  Further
Integration
KYTV  —   Though  he  faces  opposition
 
from  communist  hardliners,  President
 
Leonid  Kravchuk  said  on  January  18
 
that  he  would  not  tolerate  any  further
 
integration  of  the  CIS  and  w arned
 
m em bers  of  the  com m unity  not  to
 
press  for further political  integration.
63
Kravchuk  told  a  news  conference
 
ahead  of  this  w eek’s  CIS  summit  in
 
Minsk  that  he  w ould  not  sign  the
 
c u rre n t  d raft  o f  th e   g ro u p in g ’s
 
statutes  currently  under  discussion.
 
“The  p resid en t  an d   g o v e rn m e n t,.,
 
will  not  allow  the  CIS  to  be  turned
 
into  a  supra-national  body  subject  to
 
in te rn a tio n a l  la w ”,  h e  said .  “The
 
statutes  d o  not  in  their  essen ce  or
 
from   a  legal  stan d p oin t  m eet  the
 
needs  of  the  Ukrainian  people.  We
 
h a v e   to   co n firm   th a t  th e   CIS  is
 
w o rk in g  
w ith in  
its 
e x is tin g
 
framework.  Let  no  one  take  it  upon
 
himself to  change  this status”,
Kravchuk  earlier  had  refused  to
 
sign  the  charter,  which  now   Russian-
 
speaking  hardliners  in  Ukraine  are
 
demanding  that  he  does.
Kravchuk,  w ho  has  criticised  the
 
functioning  of  the  C om m onw ealth
 
but  says  Ukraine  w ants  to  rem ain
 
within  it,  told  reporters  he  faced  a
 
split  in  public  opinion  on  continued
 
membership.
M ore  th a n   1 5 0   m e m b e rs  o f
 
p a rlia m e n t,  m o st  from   R u ssian -
 
speaking  areas  o f  eastern   Ukraine
 
an d  
C rim e a , 
c o n v e r g e d  
o n
 
parliament  on  Monday  to  present  a
 
petition  demanding that Ukraine  sign
 
the statutes.  The  deputies  denounced
 
the  g o v e rn m e n t’s  m ark et  reform s
 
and  called  for  immediate  resumption
 
of  parliam ent  to  discuss  eco n o m ic
 
policy.
They  also  seek  the  lifting  of a ban
 
im posed  on  U kraine’s  C om m unist
 
Party  after  it  su p p o rted   the  failed
 
A u g u st  1 9 9 1   c o u p   in  M o sco w ,
 
Scuffles  broke  out  briefly  betw een
 
the  deputies  and  several  hundred
 
m em b ers  o f  the  n a tio n alist  Rukh

64
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
m o v e m e n t 
se e k in g  
U k ra in e ’s
 
withdrawal from  the  CIS.
“If there is  no  econom ic  agreement
 
within  the  CIS,  then  no  statutes  will'
 
help  u s”,  Kravchuk  told  journalists.
 
“There  are  specific  questions  to  be
 
a d d re ss e d   —   fo re ig n   d eb ts  and
 
strategic  forces  for  instance.  It  Ls  not
 
necessary  for  all  republics  to  stand  at
 
attention  to  do so".
A fter  K rav ch u k   m e t  R u ssian
 
President  Boris Yeltsin  in  Moscow  on
 
Friday,  January  15,  Ukrainian  officials
 
sa id   th ey   b e lie v e d   M o sco w   had
 
a g re e d   to  d ro p   the  id ea  o f  the
 
statutes  in  favour  of  an  eco n om ic
 
pact.  Senior  cabinet  ministers  were
 
m e e tin g   on  M onday  to   w ork   out
 
final  d etails  o f  the  g o v e rn m e n t’s
 
e c o n o m ic   re fo rm s  in te n d e d   to
 
re o rie n t  th e   e c o n o m y   on  m ark et
 
principles.
Ambassador Confirms 
Statement
In  Warsaw,  Ukraine’s  ambassador  to
 
P o la n d , 
H e n a d iy  
U d o v e n k o ,
 
confirmed  the  thought  that  Ukraine
 
m ay not sign  the  CIS  charter.
“I  think  that  K ravchuk  will  not
 
sign  it”,  U dovenko  said  at  a  news
 
conference  on  January  18.  “I  would
 
like  him   n o t  to  sign  it”,  observed
 
Udovenko,  former  Ukrainian  deputy
 
fo re ig n   m in ister  an d   lon g tim e
 
am bassador  to  the  United  Nations.
 
Udovenko,  considered  a  close  friend
 
o f  Kravchuk,  stressed  that  Ukraine,
 
w h ic h   is  e x p e r ie n c in g   a  d ee-:
 
e co n o m ic  crisis,  does  n ot  w ant  ■
 
quit  the  Commonwealth  at  prese:-..
 
“P r e s id e n t  K ra v ch u k   n e v e r  said
 
Ukraine  wants  to  leave  the  CIS”,  he
 
sa id .  “B ut  w e  a re   a g a in st  the
formation  of  a  new   superpow er  on
 
the  principles  o f  con fed eration   o r
 
,  fed eratio n ...  This  stru ctu re  w ou ld
 
’  lead   us  to   th e   re s to ra tio n   o f  the
 
former  Soviet  Union”.
He  said  that  following  the  latest
 
g u a ra n te e   on  s e c u rity   g iv e n   by
 
Russian  President  Boris  Yeltsin  to
 
K ravchuk  in  M oscow ,  his  country
 
may  modify  its  stance  on  the  new
 
ag reem en t.  U d o ven k o   w ou ld   n ot
 
discuss  Ukraine's  specific  objections
 
to  the  new  agreement,  saying  only,
 
“It  is  limiting  the  sovereign  rights  of
 
Ukraine".  Political  experts  said  that
 
the  new   agreement,  if  not  signed  by
 
Ukraine,  will  deal  the  final  blow  to
 
R u ssia’s  p la n   to  co n s o lid a te   its
 
power.
U d o v e n k o   sa id   K ra v ch u k   will
 
offer  a  new   plan  in  Minsk,  w hich
 
will  stress  the  necessity  of  econom ic
 
c o o p e r a tio n  
a m o n g  
the 
CIS
 
members.  Udovenko  charged  Russia
 
w ith   u sin g   e c o n o m ic   b la ck m a il
 
a g a in st  U k rain e. 
“W e  a re   fo r
 
e c o n o m ic   c o o p e ra tio n ,  an d   they
 
want  to  bring  us  to  our  knees”,  he
 
said.
In  Moscow,  Yeltsin  offered  Ukraine
 
secu rity  
g u a ra n te e s 
includ in g
 
p ro te ctio n   from   n u cle a r  attack   to
 
en co u rage  it  to  ratify  the  START-1
 
arms  treaty:  “Russia  gives  a  guarantee
 
to  preserve  and  safeguard  the  integrity
 
of Ukraine  :md  its  borders  and  defend
 
ir.  from  nuclear 
attach. 
ha  gives
.-'.■eh  a  g u a ra n te e ”, 
n  said,
p i ".. -;huk  said  Yeltsl  . 
a-an tee
 
■  : ; : d   m ake 
it 
e a s it.. 
him  to
 
..•crKi;tide  the  Ukrainian 
rnent  to
ratify START-1.
Vhr;  tw o  p re sid e n t: 
d  they
cu e-1  acco rd   on  the 
iosal  o f

NEWS FROM  UKRAINE
65
Ukraine’s  Soviet  nuclear  inheritance
 
an d   arm s  red u ction   treaties  —
 
reiterating  past  assurances  that  never
 
materialised but sounding more « n o u s
 
about making their promises slid«.
B oth 
lead ers 
p ro n o u n ce d
 
themselves  satisfied  with  their  work.
 
“The  m ain  political  result  o f   the
 
meeting  is  that  we  remained  friends
 
although  today  w e  could  have  parted
 
co m p a n y ”,  Yeltsin  told  a  new s
 
conference.  “The  most  important  thing
 
is  that  two  major  states,  Ukraine  and
 
Russia,  have  lived,  are  living  and  will
 
live  together  in  peace,  tranquillity,  not
 
threatening each other”,  he said.
Ukraine Begins1
 to 
impose  Export Duties
KYIV,  Jan u ary   1 9   —   A  d e cre e   of
 
Ukraine’s  Cabinet  of  Ministers  on  the
 
imposition  of  export  duties  on  items
 
that are  taken  out or mailed by  citizens
 
to  beyond  Ukraine’s  customs  border
 
takes effect on January 20.  Export duty
 
rates  are  reckoned  in  US  dollars  but
 
shall  be  paid  in  coupons,  according to
 
A lexan d er  P etrov,  ch ie f  o f  the
 
Ukrainian  State  Customs  Committee’s
 
D ep artm en t  for  C ustom s  C ontrol
 
Arrangements.  The list of goods  subject
 
to such export duties  includes  50 items
 
ranging  from  television  sets  and  tape
 
recorders to soap. 

Ukraine and Russia 
Agree  on  New Debt  Deal
KYIV,  Jan u ary   19  ~   U kraine  and
 
Russia  have  ag reed   to  service  the
 
debts  o f  the  form er  Soviet  Union
 
separately  and  divide  up  assets  of
 
the  defunct  superpower  by  the  end
o f  M arch.  The  p ro to co l  says  both
 
sides  “will  be  responsible  for  their
 
corresponding  shares.  Should  either
 
side  violate  the  repayment  schedule,
 
th e 
o th e r   sid e  
will 
n o t 
b e
 
re s p o n sib le   fo r  ca rry in g   o u t  th e
 
obligations”.  The  protocol  reverses  a
 
p re v io u s  d e a l  sig n e d   b y   fo rm e r
 
Soviet  republics  in  1990  whereby  the
 
republics  agreed  to  joint  and  several
 
responsibility  for  ali  debts.  Ukraine
 
has  accepted  responsibility  for 
1
6.4
 
p er  ce n t  o f  form er  Soviet  debt  of
 
about  $80  million. 

Chornobyl  Plant  is  Fire 
Hazard
HAMBURG,  January  20  —   Ukraine’s
 
Chornobyl  nuclear  power  plant  is  in
 
urgent  need  of  repairs  costing  millions
 
of dollars  to  reduce  the  danger  of fire,
 
according  to  German safety  inspectors.
 
A  team  of  experts  commissioned  by
 
the  European  Community  to  study  the
 
plant  said  the  former  Soviet  reactors
 
were unfit to operate by Western safety
 
standards. 

Premier Defends 
Reforms Against 
Hardliners
KYIV,  January  20  -—   Prime  Minister
 
Leonid  K uchm a  sto o d   h is  g rou n d
 
a g a in st  h a rd lin e rs  in  p a rlia m e n t
 
telling  them  his  reform  program m e
 
for  pulling  Ukraine  o u t  o f   a  d eep
 
crisis  w as  not  negotiable.  K uchm a
 
told  conservatives  w ho  d en ou n ced
 
steep  price  increases  that  the  crisis
 
in  the  former  Soviet  republic  w as  so
 
dire  that  there  was  no  alternative  to
 
his  pro-market  policies.  Inflation,  he

66
said,  was  running  at  50  per  cent  per
 
m on th ,  industrial  p ro d u ctio n   w as
 
dow n  nine  per  ce n t  over  the  past
 
year  and  food  production  had  fallen
 
15  per  cent  in  the  sam e  period.  The
 
c o u n tr y ’s  in terim   c u r r e n c y ,  th e
 
k arb o v an ets,  has  h alv ed   in  valu e
 
over the  last year. 

CIS  Naval  Forces: 
“Mistakenly” Attacked
Ukrainian  Base
KYIV,  J a n u a ry   21  —   U k rain ian
 
military  officials  accu sed   forces  o f
 
the  Black  Sea  Fleet  of  attacking  one
 
o f their  bases  and  accused  the  fleet’s
 
commanders  of provocation.
B u t  o ffic ia ls  o f  th e   fle e t,  ru n
 
jointly  by  Russia  and  Ukraine,  said
 
the  assault  on  the  anti-aircraft  base
 
was  a  misunderstanding  during  night
 
exercises  in  the  Crimean  peninsula.
 
No  one  w as  hurt.
A  sp ok esm an   for  the  Ukrainian
 
navy  said  fleet  forces  attacked  the
 
b a s e , 
firin g   b lan k   s h o ts  an d
 
“e x p lo siv e   d e v ic e s ”.  “This  w as  a
 
provocation”,  the  spokesman  said by
 
telephone.  “A  tragedy  w as  avoided
 
only  thanks  to  the  restraint  shown
 
by  Ukrainian  forces”.
A  fle e t  sp o k e sm a n   sa id   the
 
incident  involved  eight  servicemen
 
on  Fiolent  Cape  “who  were  to  have
 
m a d e  

m o ck  
a tta c k  
on 
a
 
c o m m u n ic a tio n s   c e n tre   d u rin g
 
e x e r c is e s   an d   a tta c k e d   the  b ase
 
instead”.
“This  was  not  a  deliberate  act,  but
 
rather  a  regrettable  mistake”,  the  Itar-
 
Tass  new s  ag en cy   quoted  another
 
fleet  spokesman  as  saying.  “Black  Sea
 
Fleet  and  Ukrainian  military  sites  in
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
Crimea  are  often  located  side  by  side
 
an d   se rv ice m e n   so m etim es  h ave
 
..difficulty  getting  their  bearings  with
 
bases  changing hands”.
Meanwhile,  the  chairm an  of  the
 
Ukrainian  Supreme  Council  accused
 
Russia  of  attempting  to  p rovoke  a
 
conflict  by  questioning  the  status  of
 
the  port  of  Sevastopol,  headquarters
 
of the  disputed  Black  Sea  Fleet.
Ivan  Plyushch,  in  an  appeal  to  his
 
Russian  o p p o site   n u m b er  R uslan
 
K hasbulatov,  said  the  decision  of
 
Russia’s  suprem e  legislature  to  re­
e x a m in e  
S e v a s to p o l’s 
sta tu s
 
constituted  interference  and  “seizure
 
of land”.
“We  can  only view  the  provocations
 
su rrou n d in g 
the 
‘p ro b le m ’ 
o f
 
Sevastopol  as  a  throwback  to  earlier
 
times,  an  attempt to  tie Ukraine’s hands
 
and  precipitate  a  clash  between  our
 
two nations and spill blood”,  he said.
R u ssia ’s  to p   le g is la tu re ,  th e
 
C o n g re ss  o f   P e o p l e ’s  D e p u tie s,
 
em p ow ered  the  country’s  standing
 
parliam ent  last  m onth  to  exam in e
 
the  issue,  one  of several  dividing  the
 
tw o   le a d in g   m e m b e rs  o f  th e
 
C o m m o n w e a lth   o f  In d e p e n d e n t
 
S tates. 
Russian  n a tio n a lists  in
 
C rim ea,  th eir  ranks  sw e lle d   b y
 
p e o p le   u p se t  by  p rice   in c re a s e s
 
o rd ered   by  the  Kyiv  g ov ern m en t,
 
have  resumed  demonstrations  calling
 
for secession  from  Ukraine.
F iv e  th o u sa n d   d e m o n s tra to rs
 
gathered  in  the  city  in  mid-January
 
and  a  fresh  protest  was  to  be  held
 
on  Sunday,  January  24,  to  coincide
 
w ith  th e  a rriv a l  o f   th e  n ew
 
com m ander  of  the  Black  Sea  Fleet.
 
Ukrainian  authorities  gave  the  region
 
sw e e p in g   a u to n o m y   last  y e a r,

NEWS  FROM UKRAINE
67
te m p o ra rily   lo w e rin g   te n sio n s
 
caused  by  calls  for  a  referendum  on
 
separating  from  Ukraine.  President
 
Leonid  Kravchuk  said   the  Issue  o f
 
S e v a s to p o l  w as  n o t  n e g o tia b le
 
w ithout  co n d u ctin g   a  referendum
 
throughout  Ukraine. 

Russia Wants Control 
Over Arms
MINSK,  January 
21 
—   Russia  wants
 
to  take  o ver  control  of  the  former
 
S o v ie t  U n io n ’s  s tra te g ic   n u cle a r
 
w eapons  from  the  Com m onw ealth
 
o f  Independent  States  according  to
 
Lt.  Gen.  Vladimir  Zhurbenko.  The
 
deputy  head  of  the  general  staff  of
 
th e   R u ssia n   a rm e d   fo rc e s   said
 
nuclear  w eapons  based  in  Ukraine,
 
B e la ru s  an d   K a z a k h sta n   sh o u ld
 
becom e  Russian  armed  forces  since
 
all  the  others  have  declared  they will
 
be  nuclear-free. 

Ukraine Fulfils Promise, 
Says “No” to CIS Charter
MINSK  —  
Fulfilling 
P resid en t
 
K ravchuk’s  pledge  not  to  sign  the
 
ch a rte r  o f  the  C om m on w ealth   o f
 
In d ep en den t  States,  the  Ukrainian
 
delegation  at  the  CIS  meeting here  on
 
Jan u ary  2 2   refused  to  en d orse  the
 
document at what was called a stormy
 
meeting of the presidents.
O b s e rv e rs   sa id   th at  U k ra in e ’s
 
rejectio n   o f  the  ch arter  calls  into
 
q u e s tio n   th e   fu tu re   r o le   if  n ot
 
existence  of the  Commonwealth.
Snubbing  again   the  10  o th er
 
members,  Ukrainian  officials  said  they
 
would  not  sign  a  charter  designed  to
 
solidify  p olitical,  co m m ercial  and
defence  links  among  the  countries  of
 
the old Soviet orbit
“U k rain e  c a n n o t  a c c e p t   th e
 
tra n sitio n   o f  the  CIS  in to   a  new
 
supranational  structure”,  said  Anton
 
Buteyko,  chief foreign  policy  adviser
 
to   U k ra in ia n   P re s id e n t  L eo n id
 
Kravchuk.  “It  would  b e  little  m ore
 
than  a  revival  of the  Soviet  Union”,
Since  the  in cep tion   o f  the  CIS,
 
Kravchuk  has  publicly  stated   his
 
opposition  to  any  deeper  integration  of
 
the  alignm ent  and  has  refused  to
 
approve  the  creation  of  a  supra-state
 
organisation.  At  a  press  conference  in
 
Kyiv  on  th e   e v e  o f  the  m eeting,
 
Kravchuk said that attempts to politically
 
formalise  the  CIS  sm ack  of  imperial
 
centralism.  Ukraine  cannot  accept  that
 
kind of arrangement,  he said.
While  refusing  to  sign the  27-page
 
ch arter,  K rav ch u k   re ite ra te d   that
 
Ukraine  is  not  quitting  the  CIS,  it  is
 
only  looking  for  other  avenues  o f
 
cooperation.
“The  links  that  existed  cannot  b e
 
preserved”,  Kravchuk  said.  “The  CIS
 
is  working  and  we  are  all  members
 
of the  CIS  actively  contributing  to  its
 
im p ro v e m e n t”,  K ra v ch u k   sa id ,
 
ca llin g  
e c o n o m ic  
tie s 
m o re
 
important  than  the  political  accord
 
represented by the  charter.
T h e  h e a d   o f   th e   U k ra in ia n
 
delegation,  People’s  Deputy  Dmytro
 
Pavlychko,. told  the  G erm an  Press
 
A g en cy ,  “Y ou   co u ld   say   th at  the
 
C om m on w ealth   has  fallen  a p a rt”.
 
P a v ly c h k o , 
c h a irm a n  
o f 
th e
 
Ukrainian  parliament’s  Commission
 
for  Foreign  Policy,  added,  “A  new
 
relationship  will  emerge  from  among
 
those  states  which  have  signed  the
 
document.  They  will  quickly  form  a

@8
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
confederation”.  Pavlychko,  emerging
 
briefly  from  Friday’s  deliberations,
 
stressed,  “The  CIS,  as  w e  knew  it,  no
 
longer exists".
The  U k rain ian   d e le g a tio n   h ere
 
fo c u s e d   its  a tte n tio n   s o le ly   on
 
econom ic  cooperation.
Ukraine  w as  joined  in  its  rebuff
 
by Moldova  and Turkmenistan.
On  the  eve  of the  meeting,  Ukraine
 
scorned  efforts  to  strengthen  the  post-
 
Soviet  alliance by adamantly  refusing to
 
give up legal claims to nudear weapons
 
remaining  on  its  soil.  Ukrainian  Deputy
 
Defence  Minister  Ivan  Bizhan  said  that
 
although  Soviet  strategic  n u clear
 
weapons  left  in  Ukraine  remain  under
 
Commonwealth operative  control,  “they
 
should  remain  under  the  administrative
 
jurisdiction of Ukraine”.
That  position  has  drawn  expressions
 
o f  co n ce rn   from   C om m onw ealth
 
military  commanders  that  confusion
 
over  ow nership  of  the  176  nuclear
 
m issiles  in  U kraine  cou ld   lead  to
 
d an gero u s  instability.  Russian  Air
 
Marshal  Yevgeny  Shaposhnikov,  the
 
C o m m on w ealth ’s  top  com m ander,
 
complained  this  week  that  the  nudear
 
w eapons  in  Ukraine  are  essentially
 
without an owner.
“At  present,  there  are  w eapons
 
they  are  functioning,  but  there  is  no
 
jurisdiction  of  any  state  over  them’’,
 
he  told  reporters,  saying  the  missiles’
 
legal  limbo  has  created  problems  for
 
th e  R u ssian   e x p e r ts   w h o   m ust
 
s e r v ic e   th em .  But  S h a p o sh n ik o v
 
m ad e  it  cle a r  that  Russia  h as  full
 
operational  control  over  any  nuclear
 
launch.  Ukraine  has  the  theoretical
 
rig h t  to   v e to   a  la u n c h   fro m   its
 
territory,  he  said,  but  “that  is  only  an
 
organisational  veto,  not  a  technical
o n e ’’.  S p o k e sm e n   fo r  th e   th re e
 
republics  that  refused  to  sign  the
 
draft  statute  said  they  feared  it  could
 
lead  to  an  attempt  to  re-create  new
 
federal  structures  on  the  ruins  o f the
 
old  Soviet  Union.  But  they  denied
 
th e y   w e re   p u llin g   o u t  o f  th e
 
C om m onw ealth  altogether,  leaving
 
open  the  possibility  that  they  could
 
re co n sid e r  their  d e cisio n   o r  seek
 
observer status.
“By  our  com m on  efforts  we  have
 
s u c c e e d e d   in  reso lv in g   the  m o st
 
b asic  question  in  a  w ay  that  suits
 
everybody  and  takes  into  accou n t
 
the  interests  o f  all  m embers  o f  the
 
CIS”,  Russian  President  Boris  Yeltsin
 
said  at  a  new s  co n fe re n ce   at  the
 
conclusion  of  a  one-day  summit  of
 
the  10-inem ber  C om m onw ealth  in
 
the  Belarus  capital.
Tii-.:  decisions  taken 
Minsk  are
 
likely  to  lead  to  the  de  facto  creation
 
o f  a  tw o -tie r  C o m m o n w e a lth ,
 
observers  said.  Russia, "Belarus  and
 
m ost  o f  the  u n d ev elo p ed   Central
 
••■‘ ian  republics  have  no-./  com e  out
 
: -i  favour  of  faster  inti ■:■,■■■: uion,  while
 
Ukraine,  Moldova  a:ui  Turkmenistan
 
are  d eep ly  su sp icio u s  of. Russian
 
domination.
U k ra in e ’s 
su s p ic io n s 
w e re
 
u n d e rlin e d   by  re m a rk s  by  th e
 
■ hairmnn  of  the  Ukrainian  Supreme
 
Council,  Ivan  Pliushch,  who  accused
 
poll* 'd a n s  in  Russia 
seeking  to
 
“reanim ate  the  old  empire  and  the
 
old  im p erial  p o lic y 1'.  H e  a lso
 
denounced  a  recent  resolution  of the
 
Russian  parliam ent  that  effectively
 
ch allenges  Ukrainian  control  o ver
 
the  Crimean  port  of  Sevastopol,  the
 
headquarters  of  the  Black  Sea  Fleet
 
of the  former Soviet navy.

NEWS; FROM  UKRAINE
Seven  republics  backed  the  charter:
 
Russia,  Belarus,  Armenia,  and  four
 
Central  Asian  republics,  Kazakhstan,
 
Kyrgyzstan, Tadzhikistan and Uzbekistan.
 
The  11th  original  member,  Azerbaijan,
 
has  drifted  away  from  the  organisation
 
and only sent observers to the summit
However,  in  an  effort  to  avoid  the
 
im p re ss io n   th a t  th e   a llia n ce   is
 
co m in g   a p a rt,  th e   10  re p u b lic
 
leaders  at the  summit agreed  to  keep
 
the  charter  open  for  future  signing
 
for on e year so  they  could  go  home,
 
consider  it  further  and  present  it  to
 
their parliaments.
W e ste rn   r e p o r te r s   sa id   w h en
 
F rid a y ’s  su m m it  c a m e   to  en d ,  it
 
lo o k e d   a  lo t  lik e  a 
“p e a c e fu l
 
divorce”  w as unfolding,  in the words
 
o f  Kazakhstan  President  Nursultsan
 
N a z a rb a y e v ,  w h o   h as  fa v o u re d
 
integration.
D e sp ite   th e   failu re  o f   all  CIS
 
m e m b e rs  to   lin e  u p   b e h in d   a
 
binding,  u n ifying  ch a rte r,  Yeltsin
 
declared,  “We  realise  w e  ca n ’t  live
 
w ith ou t  e a c h   o th e r”.  T h e  ch a rte r
 
calls  for 
CIS 
coordinating  bodies  —
 
on e  o f  the  p rin cip les  that  sca re d
 
Kravchuk  aw ay  out  o f  fear  that  it
 
m igh t  le a d   to   a  n e w   ce n tra l
 
government  —   such  as  a  council  of
 
d e fe n c e   m in iste rs  to   c o o rd in a te
 
military  policies.
Also,  eight  of  the  11  leaders  of  the
 
O S  agreed  to  set  up  a  joint  interstate
 
bank  to   im p rove  the  cash   flow
 
b e tw e e n   en terp rises 
and 
state
 
institutions. 
Ukraine,  Uzbekistan  and
 
Turkmenistan  opposed  the plan.  Russia
 
will  have  50  per  cent  of  the  voting
 
rights  in  the  new  bank,  which  will  use
 
the  rouble  as  a  transfer  unit.  Russian
 
Prime  Minister  Viktor  Chernomyrdin
6
$
p roposed   that  M oscow   and  its  CIS
 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   44


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling