Elizabeth Franks, Ed. D. & Barbara Tedesco. M. A. T. Elizabeth Franks, Ed. D. & Barbara Tedesco. M. A. T


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Elizabeth Franks, Ed. D. & Barbara Tedesco. M.A.T.

  • Elizabeth Franks, Ed. D. & Barbara Tedesco. M.A.T.

  • ejf24bb@aol.com babted@aol.com

  • WIDA Consultant

  • Language & Literacy Associates for Multilingual and Multicultural Education

  • LLAMAME, LLC www.education4ells.com

  • http://www.facebook.com/pages/education4ells/233538066164


  • 1. Write down anything that you have a question about without putting your name on the paper.

  • Stick it on the sheet labeled “Parking Lot” at any time of the day.





Language function

  • Language function

  • Adaptations

  • Meaningful activity

  • Schemata



Introduce yourself to your partner and explain how you got your name. (Think, Pair-Share-Square) (S.E.E.D. activity)

  • Introduce yourself to your partner and explain how you got your name. (Think, Pair-Share-Square) (S.E.E.D. activity)

  • “Identity Theft” by Cassandra Lawrence -Voices, New Jersey Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages and New Jersey Bilingual Educators (NJTESOL/NJBE) Newsletter

  • Volume 37,NO. 4 – Fall 2008











fashion personal hygiene gender roles

  • fashion personal hygiene gender roles

  • concept of time food holidays morals concept of family

  • parental involvement in education vacations group loyalties

  • verbal communication body language societal rules

  • respect for elders writing contracts music/dance animals/pets

  • conception of law, rules, and regulations mobility

  • business transactions table manners discipline





https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGTVjJuRaZ8

  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGTVjJuRaZ8

  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mgouex0WSJw



Clearly defined content objectives

  • Clearly defined content objectives

  • Clearly defined language objectives

  • Content concepts appropriate for age and educational background level of students

  • Supplementary materials used to a high degree, making lesson clear and meaningful

  • Adaptation of content

  • Meaningful activities that integrate lesson concepts with language practice opportunities for listening, speaking, reading, and writing



  • What features of Preparation did you observe in the video?

  • What are your impressions?

  • What did you observe students doing?

  • http://mediaplayer.pearsoncmg.com/_blue-top_640x360_ccv2/ab/streaming/myeducationlab/SIOP/Lesson_Prep_PowerPoint_Hi_iPad.mp4



a content objective and

  • a content objective and





http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bfq5kju627c

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bfq5kju627c





Academic Language

  • Academic Language

  • Quick write:

  • What constitutes academic language?



Turn to a partner. Person A is the one with the longer hair and the other is Person B.

  • Turn to a partner. Person A is the one with the longer hair and the other is Person B.

  • Person A will speak first and person B will write what person A says trying to capture the entire sentence.



In social studies, long sentences with multiple embedded clauses are common.

  • In social studies, long sentences with multiple embedded clauses are common.

  • Cause and effect statements are frequent.

  • Various verb forms are used:

    • “I found Rome a city of bricks and left it a city of marble.” Augustus is supposed to have spoken these words as he lay dying. He was Rome’s first emperor, and started the first of its great building programs. He claimed that he had had over 80 temples rebuilt.
  • Frequent use of pronouns it and they as referents.



Comparatives:

  • Comparatives:

    • 6 is greater than 4
    • Maria earns six times as much as Peter
    • Lin is as old as Roberto
  • Prepositions:

    • (divided) into, divided by,
    • 2 multiplied by 6 and X exceeds 2 by 7
  • Passive voice:

    • X is defined as a number greater than 7.
  • Reversals: The number a is five less than b

  • Logical connectors: if…then

    • If a is positive then -a is negative.\
  • K- How many objects would there be if we added one more?”

  • 1st - Bella added a number to 11 and got 17. What number did Bella add to 11?

  • 3rd - Write a word problem about sharing beads, where 32 ÷ 4 tells the number of

  • beads that were shared.





Reading, writing, speaking, grammar and interpreting literature

  • Reading, writing, speaking, grammar and interpreting literature

  • Connected to cognitive skills: interpretation, persuasion, cause/effect

    • Interpretation
      • Characterization and symbolism
      • Figurative language, dialogue, plot twists
    • Persuasion
      • Culturally-based
      • Language of persuasion- modals
    • Cause and effect
      • Motives for character actions
      • Author’s purpose and craft










Providing the mortar words will enable students to use language to compare and contrast.

  • Providing the mortar words will enable students to use language to compare and contrast.

  • Frontload vocabulary

  • Frontload language form with familiar concepts,

  • e.g. People have two legs, whereas dogs have four.

  • Sentence Frame:

  • ________ have __________, whereas________ have _____________.

  • Marine mammals have lungs, whereas ocean fish have gills.



The facility with which a speaker, reader and writer uses language.

  • The facility with which a speaker, reader and writer uses language.

  • Developed through focused and deliberate engagement with a range of uses of language (both oral and written), and many opportunities to practice the newly learned forms in different contexts.

  • Dutro & Moran, 2003



Making an appointment

  • Making an appointment





 

  •  

  • 1. Frozen-- Language that does not change; remains fixed

  • Examples: Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag; Preamble to the Constitution

  •  

  • 2. Formal--Complete sentences and specific word usage. This is the standard for work, school, and business.

  • Examples: Academic Interviews, academic language in classroom (lectures, instruction—mini-lessons), public speaking.

  •  

  • 3. Consultative--Formal register used in conversation

  • Example: Talking to a boss/supervisor/teacher, lawyer, doctor, Counselor (asking for assistance)

  •  

  • 4. Casual/Informal--Language used in conversation with friends. Word choice is general, and conversation is dependent upon non-verbal assists.

  • Examples: slang (writing drafts should allow casual before the formal draft because it “gets the information out” on the paper)

  •  

  • 5. Intimate--Language between lovers as well as the language between twins. This is also the language of Sexual Harassment (not for public information)

  •  This list is adapted from a list in the book A Framework for Understanding and Working with Students and Adults from Poverty (Copyright, 1995, Ruby K. Payne, RFT Publishing)

  •  



Action-

  • Action-

  • draw the line

  • blow the whistle

  • bite one’s tongue



5 Cultural Patterns

  • 5 Cultural Patterns



Discourse complexity

  • Discourse complexity

    • Cohesion
    • Quantity and variety of sentences
  • Language forms & conventions

  • Vocabulary

    • Key grade level content-specific words
    • Transitions








CONTENT

  • CONTENT

  • WALT select the 3 most significant events which led to the Revolutionary War.



It is the hallmark of SIOP® .

  • It is the hallmark of SIOP® .

  • It is challenging requiring a new way of thinking about the subject.

  • It requires knowing levels (reading, language, special needs).

  • It does not require a different objective per level i.e. objective for all to attain based on content concepts in the lesson but adjust intended outcome to match students’ ability levels.

  • It does not require teachers to become grammar experts but become aware of syntax used in their subject.



In grade level or content group, decide on a known lesson.

  • In grade level or content group, decide on a known lesson.

  • Share the content standard and objective for a lesson.

  • Keeping the same content objective, write a language objective. Differentiate for level 3 and level 1 student.

  • Share with the group.



Consider the following:

  • Consider the following:

  • the student’s literacy

  • their language proficiency

  • the cultural and age appropriateness of the

  • materials

  • the difficulty level of the material to be read (Gunderson, 1991)



  • Hands-on

  • Realia

  • Pictures

  • Visuals

  • Multimedia

  • Technology

  • Demonstrations

  • Related literature

  • Hi-lo readers

  • Adapted texts

  • Stickers



Divide into 5 teams. Each team subdivides into pro and con positions. Your team will be assigned a topic.

  • Divide into 5 teams. Each team subdivides into pro and con positions. Your team will be assigned a topic.

    • Content objectives and language objectives should be addressed in separate lessons.
    • It is necessary to tell and review the objectives each day.
    • Supplementary materials should be used in place of textbooks.
    • All lessons should include L, S, R and W practice.
          • Jigsaw




As the plates of the crust move, they can collide.

  • As the plates of the crust move, they can collide.

  • Compost is a mixture of decaying, organic material.

  • Slavery grew in the South after the invention of the cotton gin.

  • Julio buys a slice of pizza for $1.68. He gives the cashier a five-dollar bill. How much change should Julio receive? How does the price of pizza compare to the amount Julio paid? What coins and bills did you use to count up?







Unit _____________ Text _________

  • Unit _____________ Text _________

  • Lesson _____________ Pages _____

  • Key Vocabulary:

  • Main idea:

  • Supporting Concepts:





Catfish have two systems for breathing: gills, like other fish, for use under water; and lungs, like people, for use on land, where they can breathe for twelve hours or more. Catfish would dry out and die from the heat of the sun, so they stay in water during the daytime. At night, on the other hand, they can slip out of their ponds and still stay cool while they hunt for food. They are meat eaters, so they hunt for worms, insects, and other fish. People traveling at night often see catfish crossing roads when the fish are out on these hunting expeditions (Yano, Long, Ross, 1994).

  • Catfish have two systems for breathing: gills, like other fish, for use under water; and lungs, like people, for use on land, where they can breathe for twelve hours or more. Catfish would dry out and die from the heat of the sun, so they stay in water during the daytime. At night, on the other hand, they can slip out of their ponds and still stay cool while they hunt for food. They are meat eaters, so they hunt for worms, insects, and other fish. People traveling at night often see catfish crossing roads when the fish are out on these hunting expeditions (Yano, Long, Ross, 1994).



Authentic purpose, relevance, student choice, and ownership are the keys to making learning meaningful

  • Authentic purpose, relevance, student choice, and ownership are the keys to making learning meaningful

  • Oral language development

  • Situated not abstract (opportunities) surveys, letter writing, making models, plays, games…

  • San Francisco teacher Dan Meyer’s blog has attracted much response from teachers and students http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_meyer_math_curriculum_makeover.html



Concepts explicitly linked to students’ background experiences

  • Concepts explicitly linked to students’ background experiences

  • Links explicitly made between past learning and new concepts



Curriculum as Windows and Mirrors: “Curriculum and teaching methods should provide both windows into others’ experiences, and mirrors of each student’s own reality and validity” (Emily Style, 1990)

  • Curriculum as Windows and Mirrors: “Curriculum and teaching methods should provide both windows into others’ experiences, and mirrors of each student’s own reality and validity” (Emily Style, 1990)

  • Multicultural Selves activity or

  • A Piece of My Heart/Pedacito de mi Corazón

  • The Art of Carmen Lomas Garza

  • \Reflections.ppt

  • That’s a Family



Stand up-sit down

  • Stand up-sit down

  • KWL

  • Survey (think technology)

  • May have to provide background experience to connect to lesson

  • - videos/DVDs, streaming, experiments, stories, (virtual) field trips, games, etc.



Deposits Withdrawal

  • Deposits Withdrawal

          • (Payne)


Culturally responsive pedagogy helps teachers make the connections between the content and the students’ schemata, prior knowledge and cultural perspectives.

  • Culturally responsive pedagogy helps teachers make the connections between the content and the students’ schemata, prior knowledge and cultural perspectives.

  • Culturally responsive pedagogy emphasizes acquisition of the dominant culture.

  • Culturally responsive pedagogy approaches effective instruction through a cultural lens.

  • Culturally responsive pedagogy creates learning opportunities in which students’ voices emerge and knowledge and meaning are constructed from the students’ perspectives.

  • Your turn



Questioning

  • Questioning

  • Charts

  • KWL (KWLH)





Language function

  • Language function

  • Adaptations

  • Meaningful activity

  • Schemata



Answer one of the following questions on a post-it.

      • Answer one of the following questions on a post-it.
      • What should you stop doing?
      • What should you keep doing?
      • What should you start doing?
  • Post the “ticket” on the Ticket Out chart.



http://www.teachervision.fen.com/graphic-organizers/printable/6293.html Graphic Organizers

  • http://www.teachervision.fen.com/graphic-organizers/printable/6293.html Graphic Organizers

  • www.nwrel.org -NWREL ELL Unit

  • www.siopinstitute.net - SIOP Institute

  • www.lessonlab.com - Pearson Education Co. (Lesson Lab)

  • http://www.funbrain.com/idioms

  • http://www.brainpopesl.com/

  • http://www.i-ready.com I-Ready offers an adaptive diagnostic, and both teacher-led and individualized online instruction for a complete blended learning solution.(lexile level)

  • www.readingquest.org Clock Buddies

  • http://www.colorincolorado.org/article/41025/ Differentiation of Instruction for ELLs

  • http://www.fresno.k12.ca.us/divdept/titlevii/discourse.pdf Discourse Patterns

  • The Write Path: A College Preparatory Reading and Writing Program for English Language Learners (additional resource for Discourse Patterns)

  • http://www.choiceliteracy.com/articles-detail-view.php?id=1329 Patricia Cunningham and word walls

  • http://www.readwritethink.org many ideas

  • http://www.animoto.com make slide shoes with visuals and music



Echevarria, J., and Graves, A.(2007) Sheltered Content Instruction: Teaching ELLS with Diverse Abilities. PearsonEchevarria, J., Vogt, ME., & Short, D. (2004).Making Content Comprehensible for English Language Learners: The SIOP ® Model. 4th ED. Boston: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.

  • Echevarria, J., and Graves, A.(2007) Sheltered Content Instruction: Teaching ELLS with Diverse Abilities. PearsonEchevarria, J., Vogt, ME., & Short, D. (2004).Making Content Comprehensible for English Language Learners: The SIOP ® Model. 4th ED. Boston: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.

  • Echevarria, J., Vogt, ME., & Short, D. (2010). The SIOP® Model for Teaching English – Language Arts to English Learners. Boston: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.

  • Echevarria, J., Vogt, ME., & Short, D. (2010). The SIOP® Model for Teaching Math to English Learners. Boston: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.

  • Echevarria, J., Vogt, ME., & Short, D. (2010). The SIOP® Model for Teaching Science to English Learners. Boston: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.

  • Echevarria, J., Vogt, ME., & Short, D. (2010). The SIOP® Model for Teaching Social Studies to English Learners. Boston: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.



Gottlieb, M., Ernst-Slavit, G. (2013). Academic Language in Diverse Classrooms: Promoting Content and Language Learning. Thousand Oaks: Corwin/Sage Publications.

  • Gottlieb, M., Ernst-Slavit, G. (2013). Academic Language in Diverse Classrooms: Promoting Content and Language Learning. Thousand Oaks: Corwin/Sage Publications.

  • Marzano, R., et al. (2013). Using Common Core Standards to Enhance Classroom Instruction & Assessment. Bloomington: Marzano Research Laboratory.

  • Payne Ruby. (2005). A framework for Understanding Poverty. Highlands, Tx: aha! Process, Inc.

  • Rutherford., P. (2009). Why Didn’t I Learn This in College? Second Edition. Alexandria: Just ASK Publications.

  • Zwiers, J. (2007). Building Academic Language: Essential Practices for Content Classrooms. New York: Jossey Bass Teacher.

  • Zwiers, J., & Crawford, M. (2011). Academic Conversations: Classroom Talk that Fosters Critical Thinking and Content Understandings. Portland: Stenhouse.




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