European Perspectives in Cardiology Ci rc


Download 124.45 Kb.

Sana02.03.2018
Hajmi124.45 Kb.

European Perspectives in Cardiology

European Perspectives in Cardiology

Ci

rc

ul

ati

on

: Eu

ro

pe

an

 Pe

rs

pe

cti

ve

s

f139


Circulation      June 18, 2013

On other pages...

Spotlight: Emmanuel Messas, MD, PhD

Emmanuel Messas, professor of cardiovascular medicine, Department of

Cardiovascular Medicine, and head, Vascular Unit and Ultrasound

Cardiovascular Lab, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, PARCC,

Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France, describes his work on mitral

regurgitation after myocardial infarction and ultrafast Doppler techniques

to image intramyocardial blood flow and its dynamics.

Page f143

H

anneke Takkenberg, MD, PhD, is professor of clinical



decision  making  in  cardiothoracic  interventions,

Department  of  Cardiothoracic  Surgery,  Erasmus  Uni -

versity Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Her

group’s latest article in Circulation

1

reported on the surgi-



cal outcome of discrete subaortic stenosis in adults. The

international  multicentre  study  was  designed  by  Denise

van der Linde, MSc, PhD, a “young outstanding medical

graduate and researcher” supervised by Professor Takken -

berg  and  cardiologist  Professor  Jolien  Roos-Hesselink,

MD, PhD. 

Dr van der Linde travelled to Canada and Belgium to

collect the data from 313 adult patients who had under-

gone surgery for discrete subaortic stenosis at 4 centres. She

then applied innovative mixed-effects and joint models to

assess the postoperative progression of discrete subaortic

stenosis  and  aortic regurgitation  as  well  as  the need  for

reoperation. 

The  study  concluded  that  survival  is  excellent  after

surgery for discrete subaortic stenosis, but reoperation for

recurrent discrete subaortic stenosis is not uncommon.

Professor Takkenberg comments, “Due to the tremen-

dous improvements made in the past decades in the diag-

nosis  and  treatment  of  congenital  heart  disease  during

childhood,  cardiac  surgery  practice  is  increasingly  con-

fronted with young adult patients with complex congenital

heart disease. A major challenge in studying outcome after

congenital cardiac surgery is that most single-centre patient

cohorts are small, which makes it hard to draw any valid

conclusions  on  determinants  of  outcome.  Denise’s  study

illustrates that successful collaboration in the field of con-

genital heart disease research is feasible and meaningful,

and the finding that additional myectomy is of no added

value and is associated with an increased risk of heart block

is important information for cardiac surgeons.” Dr van der

Linde defended her PhD thesis with honours on April 19,

2013.


“The Model Proved Useful for Clinicians to Assess 

the Advantages and Disadvantages of the Different

Treatment Options for Individual Patients”

Over  the  past  decade,  Professor  Takkenberg’s  interests

have focused on heart valve research, and specifically the

development of evidence-based models to predict individ-

ual patient outcome.  

When she started working in Erasmus MC in 1996, the

group in Rotterdam had just started experimenting with the

use of simulation models to predict age and gender-specific

outcome of patients with a Bjork-Shiley convexo-concave

heart valve prosthesis. Professor Takkenberg says, “These

prostheses had a tendency toward outflow strut fracture, with

serious and usually deadly consequences. Using simulation



Spotlight: Hanneke Takkenberg, MD, PhD

Hanneke Takkenberg, professor of clinical decision making in cardiothoracic interventions,

Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam,

The Netherlands, talks to Mark Nicholls.

“Good Medical Decisions Require not only Evidence and

Consideration of the Clinical State and Circumstances 

of the Patient, but also Informed Patient Preferences”

June 18, 2013, pp.139-144forpress5.6.13Messas_Cir Euro Template 1  06/06/2013  17:19  Page 1

 by guest on March 1, 2018

http://circ.ahajournals.org/

Downloaded from 


models, it was possible to weigh the hazard of a strut frac-

ture  against  the  risk  of  preventive  removal  of  the  heart

valve  prosthesis  and  provide  evidence-based  advice  to

patients. 

“When I started working in Rotterdam, I focused on the

development of evidence-based microsimulation models to

predict outcome after aortic valve replacement with different

types of heart valve prostheses and on reporting clinical out-

come  of  the  Rotterdam  prospective  human  tissue  valve

cohort, eventually applying the microsimulation models to

this cohort.

2,3 


The model proved to be useful for clinicians

to assess the advantages and disadvantages of the different

treatment  options  for  individual  patients,  for  example  to

weigh the lifetime risk of a reoperation after bioprosthetic

aortic valve replacement versus the lifetime risk of major

bleeding events after mechanical aortic valve replacement.

However, it remains difficult to assess which is worse for

the individual patient: a reoperation or a bleeding. This is a

value-sensitive issue.”

4

Another strong area of research in Rotterdam involved



human tissue valves, with the centre performing a large vol-

ume of Ross procedures and homograft aortic valve replace-

ments every year, and maintaining a prospective database.

5,6


Professor Takkenberg has been a council member of the

Society for Heart Valve  Disease  since  2007,  where  she  is

chair of its working group on epidemiology and a member of

the aortic valve repair working groups. She was also a mem-

ber of the Valvular Heart Disease Taskforce that produced

the recent European Society of Cardiology and the European

Association  for  Cardiothoracic  Surgery  guidelines  on  the

management of valvular heart disease.

7

As a member of the



Netherlands  Association  for  Cardiothoracic  Surgery,  she

chairs the Heart Valve Decision Aid Working Group, and she

was a member of the National Data Registration Audit Com -

mittee and the KinCor Working Group (design and initiation

of a new Dutch paediatric cardiology patient registry). 

Work by another researcher that has had the most impact

on Professor Takkenberg’s work and the way she thinks is an

article in 2000 by Per Kvidal, MD, from the Department of

Cardiology,  University  Hospital,  Uppsala,  Sweden.

8

Professor Takkenberg says, “Per Kvidal opened my eyes to



the fact that life expectancy after aortic valve replacement is

markedly  reduced,  in  particular  in  young  adult  patients.

Although observed survival is worse in older patients, rela-

tive  survival  is  inversely  associated  with  patient  age:  the

observed/expected mortality ratio of patients <50 years of

age  is  4.5  compared  with  the  age-matched  general

population. In contrast, patients ≥70 years of age have a life

expectancy  comparable  to  the  general  population.  These

observations  form  the  foundation  of  my  microsimulation

studies  of  age  and  gender-specific  patient  outcomes  after

aortic valve replacement with different types of prostheses.”

“I Will Make Sure That a Decision Aid Becomes

Available for Heart Valve Patients Next Year”

Professor Takkenberg studied medicine at the University of

Groningen  School  of  Medicine,  Groningen,  The  Nether -

lands, and the Vrije University of Amsterdam, qualifying

for an MD in 1994. She says, “Early on in medical school

I was fascinated by congenital heart defects and volunteered

to  help  out  with  experimental  research  in  lambs  in  which

congenital anomalies were surgically created. The setting of

the operating room and the ingenious way the researchers

did their measurements amazed me. I then decided to pursue

a career in the field of cardiovascular disease.” 

In  1993,  Professor  Takkenberg  had  the  opportunity  to

spend 2 months at the California Pacific Medical Center, San

Francisco, CA, where she worked in the heart transplanta-

tion lab with Winston Wicomb, PhD, a biochemist who used

to run the heart transplantation labs for Christiaan Barnard,

MD, in South Africa. Under the “inspiring supervision” of

Dr  Wicomb,  Professor  Takkenberg  developed  a  working

heart model in rabbits within 2 months and from there “a

profound passion for cardiovascular research.”

In 1994, Professor Takkenberg travelled to Los Angeles

to work in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the

Cedars-Sinai  Medical  Center  under Alfredo Trento,  MD,

FACS. She says, “I worked there for 2 years in the heart

transplantation lab as a research fellow studying the effect

of chronic alcohol use in donors on transplanted hearts

10

Ci

rc

ul

ati

on

: Eu

ro

pe

an

 Pe

rs

pe

cti

ve

s

Circulation June 18, 2013

f140


Professor Takkenberg chaired the TOP committee of the Dutch

Female  Physicians  Association  that  promotes  female  medical

leadership  and  is  cofounder  of  the  Erasmus  MC  Network  for

Women  in  Academic  Medicine  (VENA).  She  says,  “In  2006,

together with Professor Roos-Hesselink, I founded VENA to pro-

mote female medical leadership and was cochair until 2011. It is

great to see that since 2006 a lot has changed in my institution:

VENA has empowered female medical specialists and researchers

to  network  more  actively,  improve  their  career  planning,  and

become  more  visible  within  our  organisation.  VENA  has  also

pushed the Erasmus MC organisation to stimulate high-potential

young female medical specialists and scientists through manage-

ment development programmes and courses and commit chairs of

departments  to  actively  push  their  young  female  academic  tal-

ent.” Photograph courtesy of Professor Takkenberg.

June 18, 2013, pp.139-144forpress5.6.13Messas_Cir Euro Template 1  06/06/2013  17:19  Page 2

 by guest on March 1, 2018

http://circ.ahajournals.org/

Downloaded from 


Ci

rc

ul

ati

on

: Eu

ro

pe

an

 Pe

rs

pe

cti

ve

s

and built my first database of heart transplantation recipi-

ents. I also worked in the heart transplantation procurement

team, collecting donor hearts for transplantation throughout

the West Coast. This experience at Cedars-Sinai made me

realise that I preferred research to clinical practice because it

allowed me to push knowledge forward and work on better

surgical treatment for future patients with heart disease.”

In  1996,  Professor  Takkenberg  returned  to  The

Netherlands  as  a  research  fellow  at  the  Department  of

Cardiothoracic  Surgery,  Erasmus  University  Medical

Center, and worked for an MSc and a PhD in clinical epi-

demiology. From 2007 and 2012, she was associate profes-

sor  and  director  of  the  Research  Division  at  Erasmus

University  Medical  Center.  Then  in  November  2012,

Professor Takkenberg was appointed to her current role as

professor  of  clinical  decision  making  in  cardiothoracic

interventions.  She  describes  obtaining  the  post  as  her

proudest  achievement  and  says,  “My  current  position

allows me to work with young and enthusiastic researchers

who are eager to learn and excel. The position also allows

me to expand my research to advance prognostic modelling

in the field of cardiothoracic interventions, implement sim-

ulation models in shared decision-making tools, and trans-

late complex knowledge to a format that is comprehensible

to patients.”

Professor  Takkenberg’s  department  chief,  Ad  Bogers,

MD, PhD (see http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/120/1/f1),

has  helped  shape  her  career.  She  says,  “I  owe  a  lot  to

Professor Bogers. He has always supported me: his door

was—and still is—always open for advice and guidance.”

Professor Sir Magdi Yacoub, MD, FRS, FRCS, FRCP,

has also been inspirational. Professor Takkenberg explains,

“He [Professor Sir Magdi Yacoub] taught me to always stay

curious,  question  every  observation,  and  remain  a  modest

person who serves the patient. His genius and creative mind

and his perseverance are what I admire most. I had the priv-

ilege to collaborate with him on several occasions, usually

on projects concerning the Ross procedure. Now retired, he

is still active as a surgeon and scientist through his Chain of

Hope  charity  (see  http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/114/9/

f133)  to  develop  sustainable  clinical  and  research  cardiac

centres for the treatment of children and young people with

heart diseases in countries where the facilities for such treat-

ments are unavailable. He is a truly remarkable man.”

Professor Takkenberg enthusiastically embraces a num-

ber of teaching roles for the Erasmus MC medical curricu-

lum, the Cardiovascular School Erasmus Rotterdam PhD

and  research  seminar  programmes,  the  European  Asso -

ciation for Cardiothoracic Surgery educational programme,

The  Netherlands  Association  for  Cardiothoracic  Surgery

education programme, the Netherlands Institute for Health

Sciences MSc Clinical Research programme, and self-initi-

ated  international  student  exchange  with  internationally

renowned institutes.

Within the Erasmus MC medical curriculum, together

with Professor Willem Helbing, MD, PhD, and Professor

Roos-Hesselink,  Professor  Takkenberg  initiated  the  3rd-

year  minor  Congenital  Heart  Disease  in  2010.  She  also

teaches evidence-based informed shared decision making

as part of the MSc Medicine programme at Erasmus MC

and supervises PhD theses. She says, “I truly enjoy teach-

ing informed shared decision making to 4th-year medical

students, helping them realise that good medical decisions

require not only evidence and consideration of the clinical

Circulation

June 18, 2013

f141


Professor Takkenberg says her most important and most enjoyable research was a lengthy review of the Ross Procedure.

9

She describes

the work as “a truly multidisciplinary effort” triggered during “an inspiring daylong informal meeting” in November 2005 when her col-

laborators (shown above) examined explanted autograft specimens under the microscope and hypothesised about determinants of dura-

bility of the Ross procedure. “Following the meeting, I started working on the systematic review on outcome after the Ross procedure

because we all agreed that the individual case series were all too small and usually with a limited follow-up duration and thus insuffi-

cient to explore determinants of outcome,” says Professor Takkenberg. “The work took >3 years, but the results were of great value to

the Ross community.” From left to right, standing: Professor Roos-Hesselink, Professor Takkenberg, Professor Paul Schoof, paediatric

cardiac surgeon, UMC Utrecht, Professor Bogers, Loes Klieverik, PhD student, Professor Lex van Herwerden, chief of cardiac surgery,

UMC Utrecht, Sir Magdi Yacoub, and Pieter Zondervan, pathologist, Erasmus MC; sitting: Martijn van Geldorp, PhD student, Sietske

Zoontjes, medical student, and Dr Robert-Jan van Suijlen, pathologist, UMC Maastricht. Photograph courtesy of Professor Takkenberg.

June 18, 2013, pp.139-144forpress5.6.13Messas_Cir Euro Template 1  06/06/2013  17:19  Page 3

 by guest on March 1, 2018

http://circ.ahajournals.org/

Downloaded from 


Ci

rc

ul

ati

on

: Eu

ro

pe

an

 Pe

rs

pe

cti

ve

s

Circulation

June 18, 2013

f142


state  and  circumstances  of  the  patient  but  also  informed

patient preferences.

“Additionally, supervising my PhD students is the best

thing ever. I try to make the PhD trajectory an adventurous

journey for them, not only focusing on their particular PhD

subject, but also broadening their horizon by stimulating

them to travel for short or longer research visits abroad.”

Professor Takkenberg advises people wanting to follow

a  career  in  medicine,  cardiology,  or  cardiac  surgery  to

“work  hard,  have  a  heart  for  patients  and  their  families,

always  be  curious,  and  keep  an  open  mind.”  She  adds,

“The 21st-century doctor has an extremely challenging role

in an ever-changing society where disease-related informa-

tion (reliable and unreliable) can be found anywhere, new

insights into disease and treatment options seem to emerge

every day, and keeping up is like chasing a moving target.

Make sure to keep a good work–life balance.”

In the future, Professor Takkenberg plans to “develop

and implement in clinical practice evidence-based shared

decision-making  tools  for  cardiothoracic  interventions.”

She says, “As chair of the Dutch Association for Cardio -

thoracic  Surgery  quality  project  ‘Heart  Valve  Decision

Aid,’ I will make sure that a decision aid for Dutch heart

valve patients becomes available next year. The decision

aid will first be tested in experimental and implementation

research, additionally employing microsimulation models

to ascertain evidence-based individualised patient prognos-

tication.  Finally,  we  also  intend  to  explore  the  synergy

between optimised decision making and cost-effectiveness

of different cardiothoracic intervention options.”



References

1.  van der Linde D, Roos-Hesselink JW, Rizopoulos D, Heuvelman HJ,

Budts W, van Dijk AP, Witsenburg M, Yap SC, Oxenius A, Silversides

CK, Oechslin EN, Bogers AJ, Takkenberg JJ. Surgical outcome of dis-

crete  subaortic  stenosis  in  adults:  a  multicenter  study.  Circulation.

2013;127:1184–1191.

2.  Takkenberg JJ, Eijkemans MJ, Steyerberg EW. Simulation techniques

to  support  prosthetic  valve  choice  in  aortic  valve  replacement.  Ann



Thorac Surg. 2001;72:1795–1796.

3.  Takkenberg  JJ,  Eijkemans  MJ,  van  Herwerden  LA,  Steyerberg  EW,

Lane MM, Elkins RC, Habbema JD, Bogers AJ. Prognosis after aortic

root replacement with cryopreserved allografts in adults. Ann Thorac



Surg. 2003;75:1482–1489.

4.  van Geldorp MW, Eric Jamieson WR, Kappetein AP, Ye J, Fradet GJ,

Eijkemans MJ, Grunkemeier GL, Bogers AJ, Takkenberg JJ. Patient

outcome after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical or biological

prosthesis:  weighing  lifetime  anticoagulant-related  event  risk  against

reoperation risk. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2009;137:881–886.

5.  Takkenberg JJ, Klieverik LM, Bekkers JA, Kappetein AP, Roos JW,

Eijkemans MJ, Bogers AJ. Allografts for aortic valve or root replace-

ment:  insights  from  an  18-year  single-center  prospective  follow-up

study. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2007;31:852–860. 

6.  Mokhles MM, Rizopoulos D, Andrinopoulou ER, Bekkers JA, Roos-

Hesselink JW, Lesaffre E, Bogers AJ, Takkenberg JJ. Autograft and

pulmonary allograft performance in the second post-operative decade

after  the  Ross  procedure:  insights  from  the  Rotterdam  Prospective

Cohort Study. Eur Heart J. 2012;33:2213–2224.

7.  Vahanian A, Alfieri O, Andreotti F, Antunes MJ, Barón-Esquivias G,

Baumgartner H, Borger MA, Carrel TP, De Bonis M, Evangelista A,

Falk V, Lung B, Lancellotti P, Pierard L, Price S, Schäfers HJ, Schuler

G, Stepinska J, Swedberg K, Takkenberg J, Von Oppell UO, Windecker

S, Zamorano JL, Zembala M; ESC Committee for Practice Guidelines

(CPG); Joint Task Force on the Management of Valvular Heart Disease

of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC); European Association

for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS). Guidelines on the management

of valvular heart disease (version 2012): the Joint Task Force on the

Management  of Valvular  Heart  Disease  of  the  European  Society  of

Cardiology (ESC) and the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic

Surgery (EACTS). Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2012;42:S1–S44.

8.  Kvidal P, Bergstrom R, Horte LG, Stahle E. Observed and relative sur-

vival  after  aortic  valve  replacement.  J  Am  Coll  Cardiol.  2000;35:

747–756.


9.  Takkenberg JJ, Wang HM, Trento A, Popov A, Freimark D, Eghbali K,

Wang CH, Blanche C, Czer LS. The effect of chronic alcohol use on

the heart before and after transplantation in an experimental model in

the rat. J Heart Lung Transplant. 1997;16:939–945.

10. Takkenberg  JJ,  Klieverik  LM,  Schoof  PH,  van  Suylen  RJ,  van

Herwerden LA, Zondervan PE, Roos-Hesselink JW, Eijkemans MJ,

Yacoub MH, Bogers AJ. The Ross procedure: a systematic review and

meta-analysis. Circulation. 2009;119:222–228.



Contact details for Professor Takkenberg: Department of

Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Bd563m, Erasmus University

Medical Center, P.O. Box 2040, 3000CA Rotterdam, The

Netherlands. Tel: +31-10-7035413. Fax +31-10-7033993.

Mark Nicholls is a freelance medical journalist.

Professor Takkenberg with her family. She is married to Mark De

Groot and they have 4 daughters between 4 and 17 years of age.

Away from medicine, her interests include holidays with her family

on her favourite Dutch island, Ameland, with a barbecue on the

beach, horse riding, reading, and biking. She particularly enjoys

literature on advances in medical sciences. Professor Takkenberg

says, “One of my daughters required, and luckily survived, a stem

cell transplantation in 2009. It was tough to be ‘on the other side’

as the parent of a patient and it made me realise that there is so

much work to do to improve patient information and support. This

experience pushed me, in 2010, to become an active volunteer for the

Dutch Childhood Cancer Parent Organisation, a national organi-

sation of parents of children with cancer. We provide support, infor-

mation, and advocacy for patients, parents, and families and I find

it fulfilling to help out.” Photo courtesy of Professor Takkenberg.

June 18, 2013, pp.139-144forpress5.6.13Messas_Cir Euro Template 1  06/06/2013  17:19  Page 4

 by guest on March 1, 2018

http://circ.ahajournals.org/

Downloaded from 


Ci

rc

ul

ati

on

: Eu

ro

pe

an

 Pe

rs

pe

cti

ve

s

Circulation

June 18, 2013

f143


E

mmanuel  Messas,  MD,  PhD,  professor  of  medicine

and  cardiologist,  Department  of  Cardiovascular

Medicine  and  head,  Vascular  Unit  and  Ultrasound

Cardiovascular Lab, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou,

PARCC,  Université  Paris  Descartes,  Paris,  France,  is  the

last author of a recent article in Circulation.

1

This article



demonstrates that comprehensive annular and subvalvular

repair  improves  long-term  reduction  of  both  chronic

ischaemic mitral regurgitation and left ventricular remodel-

ling without reducing global or segmental left ventricular

function at follow up.

Professor  Messas  and  his  colleagues  undertook  this

research for the Leducq Foundation Mitral Valve Disease:

From Genetic Mechanisms to Improved Repair (MITRAL)

Transatlantic Network, for which the European coordinator

is Albert A.  Hagège,  MD,  PhD,  professor  of  cardiology,

Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, and member of the

French  Institute  of  Health  and  Medical  Research  (Unit

633), Paris, France. The US coordinator is Professor Robert

A. Levine, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston,

MA,  and  Harvard  Medical  School,  Boston. The  network

received substantial funding for their research, which was

carried out from 2008 to 2013. 

Other  members  of  the  group  based  at  Paris  Cardio -

vascular  Research  Centre  at  Hôpital  Européen  Georges

Pompidou (PARCC)  are  Professor  Michel  Desnos,  MD,

Professor  Phillipe  Menasché,  MD,  world-known  Professor

Alain  Carpentier,  MD,  PhD,  who  pioneered  mitral  valve

repair and who gave Professor Messas his initial passion for

valve  disease,  Alain  Bel,  MD,  and  Catherine  Szymanski,

MD, who is first author of the study. 

“Ischaemic mitral regurgitation is diffi-

cult  to  treat,”  says  Professor  Messas.

“After myocardial infarction, left ventricu-

lar remodelling results in mitral regurgita-

tion. Treatment is to use a ring, but this has

high rates of recurrence of mitral regurgita-

tion  and  the  left  ventricular  remodelling

remains.”  Professor  Messas  comments,

“We need to treat the cause: the left ven-

tricular remodelling.”

The  idea  behind  the  research  came

when Professor Messas was a research fel-

low  at  Massachusetts  General  Hospital,

when he looked at ways to decrease mitral

valve leaflet tethering by disconnecting the leaflet from the

displaced papilary muscles. “The question is which chordae

to cut: the basal or the marginal? If you cut the basal chor-

dae, there is no prolapse and you improve the shape of the

mitral leaflet and improve mitral regurgitation; if you cut

the marginal chordae, the result is prolapse,” says Professor

Messas.


“From 2000, when we worked on the acute model, to

2012,  we  have  collaborated  with  Professor  Levine  on

mitral  valve  disease  research  funded  by  the  National

Institutes  of  Health.  Together  with  Professor  Levine  and

Professor  Hagege,  we  have  published  several  articles  in

Circulation on the efficacy of mitral valve chordal cutting

to  reduce  chronic  ischaemic  mitral  regurgitation  and  left

ventricular remodelling.

2–5


” 

“Ultrafast Imaging With Ultrasound Has Emerged as a

Unique Novel Technique for Tissue Imaging”

Professor Messas studied for a BA in mathematics from the

Academy of Paris before working for his medical degree at

the University of Paris. After 2 years as a cardiovascular

fellow at Broussais Hospital, Paris, he decided to focus on

cardiology. He then won a fellowship in cardiology at the

Institute  of  Science  and  Medical  Research,  Paris,  under

Professor Hagege. In 1999, he spent 2 years as a research

fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital under the men-

torship  of  Professor  Levine,  who  has  guided  his  career

development. In 2006, Professor Messas was awarded his

PhD  in  biomedical  engineering  from  the  Institute  of

Science and Medical Research. 

Spotlight: Emmanuel Messas MD, PhD

Emmanuel Messas, professor of medicine and cardiologist, Department of Cardiovascular

Medicine, and head, Vascular Unit and Ultrasound Cardiovascular Lab, 

Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, PARCC, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France,

talks to Paula Hensler MD.

“Ultrasound Imaging Can Help Better Understand and Treat

Ischaemic Mitral Regurgitation”

Professor  Messas  (2nd  right)  with  from  left  to  right,  Professor  Menasché,  Professor

Hagege, and Professor Michel Desnos. Photograph courtesy of Professor Messas. 

June 18, 2013, pp.139-144forpress5.6.13Messas_Cir Euro Template 1  06/06/2013  17:20  Page 5

 by guest on March 1, 2018

http://circ.ahajournals.org/

Downloaded from 


The opinions expressed in Circulation: European Perspectives

in Cardiology are not necessarily those of the editors or of 

the American Heart Association.



Ci

rc

ul

ati

on

: Eu

ro

pe

an

 Pe

rs

pe

cti

ve

s

Circulation

June 18, 2013

f144


Editor: Christoph Bode, MD, FESC, FACC, FAHA

Managing Editor: Lindy van den Berghe, BMedSci, BM, BS

We welcome comments. E-mail: lindy@circulationjournal.org

References

1. Szymanski  C,  Bel  A,  Cohen  I,  Touchot  B,  Handschumacher  MD,

Desnos M, Carpentier A, Menasché P, Hagège AA, Levine RA, Messas

E;  Leducq  Foundation  MITRAL  Transatlantic  Network.  Compre -

hensive  annular  and  subvalvular  repair  of  chronic  ischemic  mitral

regurgitation  improves  long-term  results  with  the  least  ventricular

remodeling. Circulation. 2012;126:2720–2727. 

2. Messas E, Guerrero JL, Handschumacher MD, Conrad C, Chow CM,

Sullivan S, Yoganathan AP, Levine RA. Chordal cutting: a new thera-

peutic  approach  for  ischemic  mitral  regurgitation.  Circulation.

2001;104:1958–1963. 

3. Messas E, Pouzet B, Touchot B, Guerrero JL, Vlahakes GJ, Desnos M,

Menasché  P,  Hagège  A,  Levine  RA.  Efficacy  of  chordal  cutting  to

relieve  chronic  persistent  ischemic  mitral  regurgitation.  Circulation.

2003;108(Suppl 1):I1111–I1115.

4. Messas E, Yosefy C, Chaput M, Guerrero JL, Sullivan S, Menasché P,

Carpentier  A,  Desnos  M,  Hagege  AA,  Vlahakes  GJ,  Levine  RA.

Chordal cutting does not adversely affect left ventricle contractile func-

tion. Circulation. 2006;114(Suppl 1):I1524–I1528.

5. Messas E, Bel A, Szymanski C, Cohen I, Touchot B, Handschumacher

MD, Desnos M, Carpentier A, Menasché P, Hagège AA, Levine RA.

Relief of mitral leaflet tethering following chronic myocardial infarc-

tion  by  chordal  cutting  diminishes  left  ventricular  remodeling.  Circ

Cardiovasc Imaging. 2010;3:679–686. 

6. Osmanski  BF,  Pernot  M,  Montaldo  G,  Bel A,  Messas  E,  Tanter  M.

Ultrafast Doppler imaging of blood flow dynamics in the myocardium.

IEEE Trans Med Imaging. 2012;31:1661–1668.

7. Pernot M, Couade M, Frank M, Mirault T, Blanchard A, Niarra R, Azizi

M, Emmerich J, Tanter M, Messas E. Real-time evaluation of the local

carotid  pulse  wave  velocity  using  ultrafast  echo  imaging  in  healthy

population. Eur Heart J. 2012; 852:33 (Abstract Suppl).

8. Faugeroux  J,  Nematalla  H,  Li W,  Clement  M,  Robidel  E,  Frank  M,

Curis E, Ait-Oufella H, Caligiuri G, Nicoletti A, Hagege A, Messas E,

Bruneval P, Jeunemaitre X, Bergaya S. Angiotensin II promotes tho-

racic aortic dissections and ruptures in Col3a1 haploinsufficient mice.

Hypertension. 2013;Apr 29. Epub ahead of print.

Contact details for Professor Messas: Pôle Cardiovasculaire,

Service de Médecine Vasculaire-HTA, Hôpital Européen G.

Pompidou, 20 rue Leblanc, 75908 Paris Cedex 15. INSERM

U633,PARCC,Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France.

Tel: +33 1 56 09 37 55. E-mail: emmanuel.messas@egp.aphp.fr 

Paula Hensler is a freelance medical writer.

As head of the Vascular Unit, Professor Messas works

on a new strategy to treat patients with polyvascular dis-

ease and anticoagulation protocols for deep vein thrombo-

sis and atrial fibrillation. He recently changed his research

and work focus from valvular heart disease to common and

rare vascular disease but using the same philososphy based

on  using  advanced  ultrasound  technique  to  better  under-

stand and treat cardiovascular disease. He has started a col-

laboration  with  Professor  Mathias  Fink,  PhD,  Institut

Langevin,  École  Supérieure  of  Industrial  Physics  and

Chemistry, Paris, and uses ultrasound to better understand

vascular  disease.  The  ultrafast  technique  developed  by

Professor Fink’s lab can with the same probe image at high

frame rate the arterial pulse wave and send a shear wave on

the  arterial  wall  to  calculate  local  arterial  stiffness.  This

revolutionary  technique  can  also  calculate  in  real  time,

local myocardial stiffness and intramyocardial blood flow

and  its  dynamics.  Other  collaborators  at  the  Institut

Langevin are Professor Michael Tanter, PhD, and Mathieu

Pernot,  PhD.  The  research  is  sponsored  by  the  French

Society of Cardiology with collaborations from the Agence

Nationale de Recherche and Societe Française de Medicine

Vasculaire. Professor Messas says, “Ultrafast imaging with

ultrasound has emerged as a unique novel technique for tis-

sue  imaging  at  ultra  high  frame  rates  (up  to  10, 000

images/s).”

6,7 


Professor  Messas  has  recently  conducted  research  and

published on rare vascular diseases such as vascular Ehlers-

Danlos  syndrome.  He  collaborates  with  Professor  Xavier

Jeunemaitre,  MD,  PhD,  at  the  Centre  for  Rare  Vascular

Diseases, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Paris. Other

team  members  at  the  centre  include  Professor  Pierre

Francois Plouin, MD, PhD (see http://circ.ahajournals.org/

content/127/15/f85), Dr Tristan Mirault, Dr Michael Frank,

Dr Julie Faugeroux, Dr Lahlou Laforet, and Jean Michael

Mazala. The results of their animal study on the effects of

angiotensin II in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome have been pub-

lished recently.

8

Professor Levine and Professor Messas at the King David Hotel,

Jerusalem, Israel, during the last Israeli Heart Association meet-

ing. Professor Messas is married with 4 children. He comes from

a long line of rabbis; his father was chief rabbi of Paris, and his

grandfather  was  chief  rabbi  of  Jerusalem,  Israel.  Professor

Messas  believes  in  social  responsibility;  he  serves  his  Paris

neighbourhood  as  a  vice-mayor  and  is  president  of  the  local

Jewish community. Photograph courtesy of Professor Messas.

Professor  Messas  (left)  with  his  colleagues,  from  left  to  right,  Dr

Valentine Gautier, Dr Michael Frank, Professor Jeunemaitre, Jean

Michael  Mazella,  Dr  Juliette  Albuisson,  and  Professor  Plouin.

Photograph courtesy of Professor Messas.

June 18, 2013, pp.139-144forpress5.6.13Messas_Cir Euro Template 1  06/06/2013  17:20  Page 6

 by guest on March 1, 2018

http://circ.ahajournals.org/

Downloaded from 


European Perspectives

Print ISSN: 0009-7322. Online ISSN: 1524-4539 

Copyright © 2013 American Heart Association, Inc. All rights reserved.

is published by the American Heart Association, 7272 Greenville Avenue, Dallas, TX 75231



Circulation 

doi: 10.1161/CIR.0b013e31829e057c

2013;127:f139-f144

Circulation. 

 

http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/127/24/f139.citation



World Wide Web at: 

The online version of this article, along with updated information and services, is located on the

  

 

http://circ.ahajournals.org//subscriptions/



is online at: 

Circulation 

 Information about subscribing to 



Subscriptions:

  

 



http://www.lww.com/reprints

 Information about reprints can be found online at: 



Reprints:

  

document. 



Permissions and Rights Question and Answer 

this process is available in the

click Request Permissions in the middle column of the Web page under Services. Further information about

Office. Once the online version of the published article for which permission is being requested is located

 can be obtained via RightsLink, a service of the Copyright Clearance Center, not the Editorial

Circulation

in

 Requests for permissions to reproduce figures, tables, or portions of articles originally published



Permissions:

 by guest on March 1, 2018

http://circ.ahajournals.org/

Downloaded from 




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling