Figurative language is the use of words outside their literal or usual meaning to add beauty or force


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Figurative language is the use of words outside their literal or usual meaning to add beauty or force.

  • Figurative language is the use of words outside their literal or usual meaning to add beauty or force.

  • A figure of speech may be said to occur whenever a speaker or writer, for the sake of freshness or emphasis, departs from the usual denotations of words.

  • It is characterized by the use of similes and metaphors



Literal language is meaning exactly what you say: “Go jump in a lake!”

  • Literal language is meaning exactly what you say: “Go jump in a lake!”

  • Figurative language is saying one thing and meaning another: “Go jump in a lake!”

  • Poetry relies heavily on figurative language.











“It's been a hard day's night, and I've been working like a dog.”

  • “It's been a hard day's night, and I've been working like a dog.”

  • - The Beatles

  • “My heart is like an open highway.”

  • - Jon Bon Jovi



A simile expresses a similarity. Still, for a simile to exist, the things compared have to be dissimilar in kind. It is no simile to say, “Your fingers are like mine,” it is a literal observation. But to say, “Your fingers are like sausages” is to use a simile. Omit the connective– say, “Your fingers are sausages” – and the result is a metaphor, a statement where one thing is spoken of as though it were something else, which, in a literal sense, it is not.

  • A simile expresses a similarity. Still, for a simile to exist, the things compared have to be dissimilar in kind. It is no simile to say, “Your fingers are like mine,” it is a literal observation. But to say, “Your fingers are like sausages” is to use a simile. Omit the connective– say, “Your fingers are sausages” – and the result is a metaphor, a statement where one thing is spoken of as though it were something else, which, in a literal sense, it is not.





As black as...

  • As black as...

  • As light as a...

  • As clean as a...

  • As hungry as a...

  • As proud as a...

  • As heavy as...





As black as... Coal

  • As black as... Coal

  • As light as a... Feather

  • As clean as a... Whistle

  • As quick as a... Flash

  • As hungry as a... Wolf

  • As proud as a... Peacock

  • As sharp as a... Needle

  • As heavy as... Lead

  • Like a bull in a.. China shop



Being stood up is like being the last fruit on the tree, left to wither through the winter

  • Being stood up is like being the last fruit on the tree, left to wither through the winter

  • Feeling angry is like carrying a volcano in the pit of your stomach that threatens to erupt at any moment

  • The leaves fell from the tree like a thousand paratroopers leaping into battle behind enemy lines





Like the white curls from a gigantic beard

  • Like the white curls from a gigantic beard

  • Drifting across the barber’s shop floor

  • In the breeze from the open door;

  • Like the broken parts of the ice flow

  • Afloat on the blue of the ocean,

  • Drifting southward from the Pole;

  • Like a heavily laden treasure fleet

  • In a light wind on the calm sea,

  • Hardly moving with all sails set;

  • Like suds of foam from the waterfall

  • That lathers the rocks at its foot,

  • Gliding over a tranquil pool;

  • Like wool from a fleece,

  • Like smoke from a fire,

  • Like islands in the sky.



Like the white curls from a gigantic beard

  • Like the white curls from a gigantic beard

  • Drifting across the barber’s shop floor

  • In the breeze from the open door;

  • Like the broken parts of the ice flow

  • Afloat on the blue of the ocean,

  • Drifting southward from the Pole;

  • Like a heavily laden treasure fleet

  • In a light wind on the calm sea,

  • Hardly moving with all sails set;

  • Like suds of foam from the waterfall

  • That lathers the rocks at its foot,

  • Gliding over a tranquil pool;

  • Like wool from a fleece,

  • Like smoke from a fire,

  • Like islands in the sky.



"My rhymes are like shot clocks, interstate cops and blood clots, my point is your flow gets stopped." - Talib Kweli on "Hater Players," Mos Def and Talib Kweli Are Blackstar

  • "My rhymes are like shot clocks, interstate cops and blood clots, my point is your flow gets stopped." - Talib Kweli on "Hater Players," Mos Def and Talib Kweli Are Blackstar

  • "Throwing out the wicked like God did the devil, funky like your grandpa's drawers, don't test me, we're in like that, you're dead like Presley." - Q-Tip on "Steve Biko," Midnight Marauders "Me without a mic is like a beat without a snare... I'm sweet like licorice, dangerous like syphilis." - Lauryn Hill on "How Many Mics," The Score



"Coming from the deep black like the Loch Ness, now bring apocalypse like the Heart of Darkness." - Talib Kweli on "We Got the Beat," The Beautiful Struggle

  • "Coming from the deep black like the Loch Ness, now bring apocalypse like the Heart of Darkness." - Talib Kweli on "We Got the Beat," The Beautiful Struggle

  • "You stopping us is preposterous like an androgynous misogynist, you picking the wrong time, stepping to me when I'm in my prime like Optimus, Transforming..." - Talib Kweli on "Twice Inna Lifetime," Mos Def and Talib Kweli Are Blackstar





Separation

  • Separation

  • Your absence has gone through me

  • Like thread through a needle.

  • Everything I do is stitched with its color.

  • Underline the simile and explain its meaning.



Like a glove, a black glove thrown up at the light, and falling back

  • Like a glove, a black glove thrown up at the light, and falling back

  • Wings like bits of Umbrella

  • Hanging upside down like rows of disgusting old rags

  • And grinning in their sleep

  • Swallows with spools of dark thread sewing the shadows together





“ Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee”

  • “ Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee”

  • Muhammad Ali



Write a poem between12-15 lines that uses two similes. You may write on any theme but here is a suggestion.

  • Write a poem between12-15 lines that uses two similes. You may write on any theme but here is a suggestion.

  • Consider the phrase “love is like. . .” Think about the love is like to you, and write a poem comparing love to an object, experience—anything you want.







Metaphor – direct comparison without using the words ‘like’ or ‘as’

  • Metaphor – direct comparison without using the words ‘like’ or ‘as’



“The greater part of untested men appeared quiet and absorbed. They were going to look at the war, the red animal- the blood-swollen god.”

  • “The greater part of untested men appeared quiet and absorbed. They were going to look at the war, the red animal- the blood-swollen god.”

  • The Red Badge of Courage-

  • Stephen Crane



My life is a dream, like a tiger waking up from her deep sleep. My life is like a dream, it's all up to me.

  • My life is a dream, like a tiger waking up from her deep sleep. My life is like a dream, it's all up to me.



“All the world’s a stage,

  • “All the world’s a stage,

  • And all the men and women merely players.”

  • Shakespeare -- As You Like It











How is a wave like a mountain?

  • How is a wave like a mountain?



Hokusai – ‘The Wave’

  • Hokusai – ‘The Wave’



You know a dream is like a river, ever changing as it flows. And a dreamer's just a vessel that must follow where it goes. Trying to learn from what's behind you and never knowing what's in store makes each day a constant battle just to stay between the shores.          And I will sail my vessel 'til the river runs dry.         Like a bird upon the wind, these waters are my sky.         I'll never reach my destination if I never try,         So I will sail my vessel 'til the river runs dry. Too many times we stand aside and let the water slip away. To what we put off 'til tomorrow has now become today. So don't you sit upon the shore and say you're satisfied. Choose to chance the rapids and dare to dance the tides         -Chorus- There's bound to be rough waters, and I know I'll take some falls(understood challenges). With the good Lord as my captain, I can make it through them all.

  • You know a dream is like a river, ever changing as it flows. And a dreamer's just a vessel that must follow where it goes. Trying to learn from what's behind you and never knowing what's in store makes each day a constant battle just to stay between the shores.          And I will sail my vessel 'til the river runs dry.         Like a bird upon the wind, these waters are my sky.         I'll never reach my destination if I never try,         So I will sail my vessel 'til the river runs dry. Too many times we stand aside and let the water slip away. To what we put off 'til tomorrow has now become today. So don't you sit upon the shore and say you're satisfied. Choose to chance the rapids and dare to dance the tides         -Chorus- There's bound to be rough waters, and I know I'll take some falls(understood challenges). With the good Lord as my captain, I can make it through them all.

  • ( understood God guides him in reaching his dream just like a captain guides a vessel)         -Chorus-



You know a dream is like a river, ever changing as it flows. And a dreamer's just a vessel that must follow where it goes. Trying to learn from what's behind you and never knowing what's in store makes each day a constant battle just to stay between the shores.          And I will sail my vessel (understood – live my dream) 'til the river runs dry.         Like a bird upon the wind, these waters are my sky.         I'll never reach my destination if I never try,         So I will sail my vessel 'til the river runs dry. Too many times we stand aside and let the water slip away. To what we put off 'til tomorrow has now become today(understood—we procrastinate. So don't you sit upon the shore (understood – be a bystander) and say you're satisfied. Choose to chance the rapids (understood - taking chances) and dare to dance the tides (understood – live life).         -Chorus- There's bound to be rough waters, and I know I'll take some falls(understood challenges). With the good Lord as my captain, I can make it through them all.

  • You know a dream is like a river, ever changing as it flows. And a dreamer's just a vessel that must follow where it goes. Trying to learn from what's behind you and never knowing what's in store makes each day a constant battle just to stay between the shores.          And I will sail my vessel (understood – live my dream) 'til the river runs dry.         Like a bird upon the wind, these waters are my sky.         I'll never reach my destination if I never try,         So I will sail my vessel 'til the river runs dry. Too many times we stand aside and let the water slip away. To what we put off 'til tomorrow has now become today(understood—we procrastinate. So don't you sit upon the shore (understood – be a bystander) and say you're satisfied. Choose to chance the rapids (understood - taking chances) and dare to dance the tides (understood – live life).         -Chorus- There's bound to be rough waters, and I know I'll take some falls(understood challenges). With the good Lord as my captain, I can make it through them all.

  • ( understood God guides him in reaching his dream just like a captain guides a vessel)         -Chorus-



Underline the metaphors

  • Underline the metaphors



Some say love, it is a river that drowns the tender reed. Some say love, it is a razor that leaves your soul to bleed. Some say love, it is a hunger, an endless aching need. I say love, it is a flower, and you its only seed. It's the heart afraid of breaking that never learns to dance. It's the dream afraid of waking that never takes the chance. It's the one who won't be taken, who cannot seem to give, and the soul afraid of dyin' that never learns to live. When the night has been too lonely and the road has been too long (understood – life has been hard), and you think that love is only for the lucky and the strong, just remember in the winter far beneath the bitter snows lies the seed that with the sun's love in the spring becomes the rose (understood – rose is love).

  • Some say love, it is a river that drowns the tender reed. Some say love, it is a razor that leaves your soul to bleed. Some say love, it is a hunger, an endless aching need. I say love, it is a flower, and you its only seed. It's the heart afraid of breaking that never learns to dance. It's the dream afraid of waking that never takes the chance. It's the one who won't be taken, who cannot seem to give, and the soul afraid of dyin' that never learns to live. When the night has been too lonely and the road has been too long (understood – life has been hard), and you think that love is only for the lucky and the strong, just remember in the winter far beneath the bitter snows lies the seed that with the sun's love in the spring becomes the rose (understood – rose is love).



Some say love, it is a river that drowns the tender reed. Some say love, it is a razor that leaves your soul to bleed. Some say love, it is a hunger, an endless aching need. I say love, it is a flower, and you its only seed. It's the heart afraid of breaking that never learns to dance. It's the dream afraid of waking that never takes the chance. It's the one who won't be taken, who cannot seem to give, and the soul afraid of dyin' that never learns to live. When the night has been too lonely and the road has been too long (understood – life has been hard), and you think that love is only for the lucky and the strong, just remember in the winter far beneath the bitter snows lies the seed that with the sun's love in the spring becomes the rose (understood – rose is love).

  • Some say love, it is a river that drowns the tender reed. Some say love, it is a razor that leaves your soul to bleed. Some say love, it is a hunger, an endless aching need. I say love, it is a flower, and you its only seed. It's the heart afraid of breaking that never learns to dance. It's the dream afraid of waking that never takes the chance. It's the one who won't be taken, who cannot seem to give, and the soul afraid of dyin' that never learns to live. When the night has been too lonely and the road has been too long (understood – life has been hard), and you think that love is only for the lucky and the strong, just remember in the winter far beneath the bitter snows lies the seed that with the sun's love in the spring becomes the rose (understood – rose is love).



And chiselled clear on stone,

  • And chiselled clear on stone,

  • A spider-web of shell,

  • The thumbprint of the sea



On silent hinges

  • On silent hinges

  • Open-folds her wings

  • Applauding hands



Giraffe-talk, gormless somehow

  • Giraffe-talk, gormless somehow

  • Heads hanging

  • Over the next garden



Boredom Is clouds

  • Boredom Is clouds

  • Black as old slate

  • Chucking rain straight

  • On our Housing Estate

  • All grey Day long.



My family lives inside a medicine chest: Dad is the super-size band aid, strong and powerful but not always effective in a crisis. Mom is the middle-size tweezers, which picks and pokes and pinches. David is the single small aspirin on the third shelf, sometimes ignored. Muffin, the sheep dog, is a round cotton ball, stained and dirty, that pops off the shelf and bounces in my way as I open the door. And I am the wood and glue which hold us all together with my love.

  • My family lives inside a medicine chest: Dad is the super-size band aid, strong and powerful but not always effective in a crisis. Mom is the middle-size tweezers, which picks and pokes and pinches. David is the single small aspirin on the third shelf, sometimes ignored. Muffin, the sheep dog, is a round cotton ball, stained and dirty, that pops off the shelf and bounces in my way as I open the door. And I am the wood and glue which hold us all together with my love.

  • By: Belinda



My family is an expired firecracker set off by the blowtorch of divorce. We lay scattered in many directions. My father is the wick, badly burnt but still glowing softly. My mother is the blackened paper fluttering down, blowing this way and that, unsure where to land. My sister is the fallen, colorful parachute, lying in a tangled knot, unable to see the beauty she holds. My brother is the fresh, untouched powder that was protected from the flame. And I, I am the singed, outside papers, curled away from everything, silently cursing the blowtorch.

  • My family is an expired firecracker set off by the blowtorch of divorce. We lay scattered in many directions. My father is the wick, badly burnt but still glowing softly. My mother is the blackened paper fluttering down, blowing this way and that, unsure where to land. My sister is the fallen, colorful parachute, lying in a tangled knot, unable to see the beauty she holds. My brother is the fresh, untouched powder that was protected from the flame. And I, I am the singed, outside papers, curled away from everything, silently cursing the blowtorch.



Write a poem about your family describing the members using metaphors. Your poem should be an extended metaphor

  • Write a poem about your family describing the members using metaphors. Your poem should be an extended metaphor

  • My family is a (your metaphor)

  • My father is (metaphor)

  • My mother is (metaphor)

  • I am (metaphor)

  • You get the idea



Oh, my love is like a red, red rose

  • Oh, my love is like a red, red rose

  • OR

  • My lover’s cheeks are like red roses

  • My lover’s cheeks are red roses

  • OR

  • Oh, my love is a red, red rose.



My thoughts no longer hover. . . Resting their wings.

  • My thoughts no longer hover. . . Resting their wings.

  • Eye, gazelle, delicate wanderer, Drinker of horizon’s fluid line.

  • Boy, you are a wrecking ball, crashing into me.

  • I will speak daggers to her.

  • The pen is mightier than the sword.

  • Her smile is like a ray of sunshine

  • O thy love’s like a red, red rose



My thoughts no longer hover. . . Resting their wings--Metaphor

  • My thoughts no longer hover. . . Resting their wings--Metaphor

  • Eye, gazelle, delicate wanderer, Drinker of horizon’s fluid line--Metaphor

  • Boy, you are a wrecking ball, crashing into me--Metaphor

  • I will speak daggers to her --Metaphor

  • The pen is mightier than the sword--Metaphor

  • Her smile is like a ray of sunshine—Simile

  • O thy love’s like a red, red rose--Simile



Use a metaphor to describe one of the following as a phrase or line.

  • Use a metaphor to describe one of the following as a phrase or line.

  • London Underground

  • Boots

  • A rhinoceros

  • A hive of bees

  • Fog



Color poems use your imagination and senses to investigate a subject. The focus of the poem is on using similes and metaphors. Similes compare two unlike things using with words “like” or “as.” For example: "The lake is like a whirlpool." Metaphors are like similes without using the word "like" or “as.”

  • Color poems use your imagination and senses to investigate a subject. The focus of the poem is on using similes and metaphors. Similes compare two unlike things using with words “like” or “as.” For example: "The lake is like a whirlpool." Metaphors are like similes without using the word "like" or “as.”

  • They state that one thing is something else. An example of a metaphor is “The lake is a whirlpool.”



Line 1: ________ (color) is

  • Line 1: ________ (color) is

  • Line 2: ________ (color) is

  • Line 3: ________ (color) is

  • Line 4: ________ (color) is

  • Line 5: ________ (color) smells like

  • Line 6: ________ (color) tastes like

  • Line 7: ________ (color) sounds like

  • Line 8: ________ (color) looks like

  • Line 9: ________ (color) feels like

  • Line 10: ________ (color) makes me

  • Line 11: ________ (color) is

  • Blue is the color of the sky.

  • Blue is the waves in the ocean.

  • Blue is the feeling I get sometimes.

  • Blue is the icy color of glacial snow.

  • Blue smells like freshly washed bed sheets.

  • Blue tastes like freshly squeezed blueberries.

  • Blue sounds like jets flying through the clouds.

  • Blue looks like the clear waters of the Hawaiian waters as I’m snorkeling.

  • Blue feels like the snow while I’m skiing at Mt. Bachelor.

  • Blue makes me want to put on my coat, hat and gloves.

  • Blue is a state of being

  •  



Five senses poems use your senses to study or investigate a subject. #4

  • Five senses poems use your senses to study or investigate a subject. #4

  • The focus of the poem is on using similes. Similes are comparisons

  • between two unlike things using with words “like” or “as.”

  • Directions:

  • Line 1. Tell what color an emotion or idea looks like to you.

  • Line 2. Tell what the emotion or idea tastes like (imagine it has a taste)

  • Line 3. Tell what the emotion or idea sounds like.

  • Line 4. Tell what emotion or idea smells like.

  • Line 5. Tell what the emotion or idea looks like.

  • Line 6. Tell how the emotion or idea makes you feel.

  • Examples:

  • Summer is yellow.

  • It tastes like lemonade.

  • It sounds like kids splashing in a lake.

  • It smells like dandelions.

  • It looks like boating.

  • It makes me feel overjoyed.

  •  

  • Rain is clear.

  • It tastes like water.

  • It sounds like pounding on your windows.

  • It smells like fresh pine trees.

  • It looks like dew drops on plants.

  • It makes me feel cool.

  •  





Imagery

  • Imagery



Personification: Giving human qualities to objects and animals

  • Personification: Giving human qualities to objects and animals



The moon gazed on my midnight labors,

  • The moon gazed on my midnight labors,

  • While, with unrelaxed and breathless eagerness, I pursued nature to her hiding- places

  • -Mary Shelley

  • Frankenstein



James Stephens (1882-1950)

  • James Stephens (1882-1950)

  • The wind stood up and gave a shout.

  • He whistled on his fingers and

  • Kicked the withered leaves about

  • And thumped the branches with his hand

  • And said he’d kill an kill and kill,

  • And so he will and so he will





The angry clouds marched across the sky.

  • The angry clouds marched across the sky.

  • The lonely train whistle cried out in the night.

  • The hungry chainsaw growled loudly.

  • The stubborn dense fog swallowed us.

  • The evening stars winked at me from the sky.







“January wind and the sun playing truant again.

  • “January wind and the sun playing truant again.

  • Rain beginning to scratch its fingernails across the blackboard sky.”

  • “O! how shall summer’s honey breath hold out. . .”

  • Excerpt from Roger McGough



Percy Shelley

  • Percy Shelley

  • And, like a dying lady, lean and pale,

  • Who totters forth, wrapped in a gauzy veil,

  • Out of her chamber, lead by the insane

  • And feeble wanderings of her fading brain,

  • The moon arose up in the murky east,

  • A white and shapeless mass.

  • Art thou pale for weariness

  • Of climbing heaven and gazing on the earth,

  • Wandering companionless

  • Among the stars that have a different birth,

  • And ever changing like a joyless eye

  • That finds no object worth its constancy?



Personify the following:

  • Personify the following:



The house is quiet now

  • The house is quiet now

  • The vacuum cleaner sulks in the corner closet,

  • Its bag limp as a stopped lung, its mouth

  • Grinning into the floor, maybe at my

  • Slovenly life, my dog-dead youth.

  • I’ve lived this way long enough,

  • But when my old woman died her soul

  • Went into that vacuum cleaner, and I can’t bear

  • To see the bag swell like a belly, eating the dust

  • And the woolen mice, and begin to howl

  • Because there is old filth everywhere

  • She used to crawl, in corner and under the stair.

  • I know now how life is cheap as dirt,

  • And still the hungry, angry heart

  • Hangs on and howls, biting at air.



What is the speaker’s attitude about housework?

  • What is the speaker’s attitude about housework?



Use personification to bring one of the following to life:

  • Use personification to bring one of the following to life:

  • Water

  • Stars

  • Sun

  • Tree

  • A dentist’s chair

  • Cell phone

  • Anything

  • Your poem should be at least 8 lines long



“Hope, thou bold taster of delight”

  • “Hope, thou bold taster of delight”

  • Richard Crashaw

  • “Memory, that exquisite blunderer”

  • Amy Clampitt



  • Personify Jealousy, Anger, Pride, Greed, Envy, Sloth, Love , or some other emotion

  • Your poem should be between 4-8 lines



Simile

  • Simile



Highly suggestive in a few words

  • Highly suggestive in a few words

  • Physical object that represents or stands for something else

  • Most powerful symbols do not specify the ideas they represent



List the meaning of each symbol

  • List the meaning of each symbol

  • Explain how each symbol contributes to the overall meaning of the poem



A Work of Artifice

  • A Work of Artifice

  • The bonsai tree

  • In the attractive pot

  • Could have grown eighty feet tall

  • On the side of a mountain

  • Till split by lightning.

  • But a gardener

  • Carefully pruned it

  • It is nine inches high.

  • Every day as he whittles back the branches

  • The gardener croons,

  • It is your nature

  • To be small and cozy,

  • Domestic and weak;

  • How lucky, little tree,

  • To have a pot to grow in.

  • With living creatures

  • One must begin very early

  • To dwarf their growth:

  • The bound feet,

  • The crippled brain,

  • The hair in curlers,

  • The hand you love to touch. Marge Piercy



 

  •  

  • 1. What are the symbols in the following poem?

  •  

  • 2. What do they represent? How are these symbols used to contribute to the meaning of the poem?



  • Imagery may be defined as the representation through language of sense experience. It is the use of words to create a mental picture. Poetry appeals to our senses, of course through its music and rhythms, which we actually hear when it is read aloud. But indirectly it appeals to our sense experience, the representation to the imagination of sense experience.



Sensuous imagery—pleasurable for its own sake, but also provides concreteness and immediacy.

  • Sensuous imagery—pleasurable for its own sake, but also provides concreteness and immediacy.



The word image perhaps most often suggests a mental picture, something seen in the mind’s eye—and visual imagery is the kind of imagery that occurs most frequently in poetry. But an image may also represent a sound (auditory imagery); a smell (olfactory imagery); a taste (gustatory imagery); touch, such as hardness, softness, wetness, or heat and cold (tactile imagery).

  • The word image perhaps most often suggests a mental picture, something seen in the mind’s eye—and visual imagery is the kind of imagery that occurs most frequently in poetry. But an image may also represent a sound (auditory imagery); a smell (olfactory imagery); a taste (gustatory imagery); touch, such as hardness, softness, wetness, or heat and cold (tactile imagery).



Though the term image suggests a thing seen, when speaking of images in poetry we generally mean a word or sequence of words that refers to any sensory experience.

  • Though the term image suggests a thing seen, when speaking of images in poetry we generally mean a word or sequence of words that refers to any sensory experience.

  • Remember to ask why are the images important?

  • Imagery usually helps to illuminate the meaning of the poem.



The gray sea and the long black land;

  • The gray sea and the long black land;

  • And the yellow half-moon large and low;

  • And the startled little waves that leap

  • In fiery ringlets from their sleep,

  • As I gain the cove with pushing prow,

  • And quench its speed i’ the slushy sand.

  • Then a mile of warm sea-scented beach;

  • Three fields to cross till a farm appears;

  • A tap at the pane, the quick sharp scratch

  • And blue spurt of a lighted match,

  • And a voice less loud, through its joys and fears,

  • Than the two hearts beating each to each!



Highlight the images that appeal to your senses. How do they contribute to the meaning of the poem?

  • Highlight the images that appeal to your senses. How do they contribute to the meaning of the poem?



Write a poem that appeals to the five sense. Your poem should be 10-12 lines.

  • Write a poem that appeals to the five sense. Your poem should be 10-12 lines.



Hyperbole

  • Hyperbole

  • An exaggerated expression, also called overstatement, for a particular effect, which may be humorous, satirical, or intensely emotional. Hyperbole is the expression of folktales and legends.



Example: I have mountains of work to do.

  • Example: I have mountains of work to do.



The poet uses hyperbole to overstate something to reveal the truth.

  • The poet uses hyperbole to overstate something to reveal the truth.

  • In a poem called “Sow” Sylvia Plath describes how much the sow eats. She writes, “Of kitchen slops and, stomaching no constraint,/ Proceeded to swill/ The seven seas and every earth-quaking continent.”



“ Two hundred years should go to praise / Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze:

  • “ Two hundred years should go to praise / Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze:

  • Two hundred to adore each breast:

  • And thirty thousand to the rest. . .”

  • -To his Coy Mistress



The art of losing isn’t hard to master;

  • The art of losing isn’t hard to master;

  • so many things seem filled with the intent

  • to be lost that their loss is no disaster.

  • Lose something every day. Accept the fluster

  • of lost door keys, the hour badly spent.

  • The art of losing isn’t hard to master.

  • Then practice losing farther, losing faster:

  • places, and names, and where it was you meant

  • to travel. None of these will bring disaster.



I lost my mother’s watch. And look! My last, or

  • I lost my mother’s watch. And look! My last, or

  • next- to -last, of three loved houses went.

  • The art of losing isn’t hard to master.

  • I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster,

  • some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.

  • I miss them, but it wasn’t a disaster.

  • Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture

  • I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident

  • the art of losing’s not too hard to master

  • though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.



How is hyperbole used in this poem? For what reason?

  • How is hyperbole used in this poem? For what reason?



Write a poem that uses hyperbole. Your poem should be between 10-12 lines

  • Write a poem that uses hyperbole. Your poem should be between 10-12 lines

  • A hint: The poem “One Art” repeats the same line several times (villanelle). Try writing a poem that uses the same line to begin and end the poem.



We are familiar with onomatopoeia even if we don’t understand the word. When two cars collide, what sound do they make? Crash! That is onomatopoeia – words that make the sound they are imitating.

  • We are familiar with onomatopoeia even if we don’t understand the word. When two cars collide, what sound do they make? Crash! That is onomatopoeia – words that make the sound they are imitating.



Screech

  • Screech

  • Hiss

  • Cluck

  • Neigh

  • Buzz

  • Crash

  • Pow



Here is a poem by Eve Merriam appropriately titled “Onomatopoeia.” Highlight all of the different sounds you hear.

  • Here is a poem by Eve Merriam appropriately titled “Onomatopoeia.” Highlight all of the different sounds you hear.



The rusty spigot

  • The rusty spigot

  • sputter,

  • utters

  • a sputter,

  • spatters a smattering of drops,

  • gashes wider;

  • slash,

  • splatters,

  • scatters,

  • spurts,

  • finally stops sputtering

  • and plash!

  • gushes rushes splashes

  • clear water dashes.



1. What words did you highlight?

  • 1. What words did you highlight?




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