Hindawi Publishing Corporation International Journal of Plant Genomics


Download 261.55 Kb.

bet3/3
Sana12.02.2017
Hajmi261.55 Kb.
1   2   3

stresses (cold, and sulfate starvation); others (protein amino acid

phosphorylation; protein folding, and biological processes unknown)



Biosynthesis (alkaloids, folic acid and its derivatives, trehalose, and tRNA

processing); transport (metal ions, and protein import into nucleus); gene



regulation (DNA methylation, nuclear mRNA splicing; posttranscriptional gene

silencing, and transcription factors); response to biotic and abiotic stresses

(oxidative stresses); others (protein modification process, and 

biological processes unknown)



Biosynthesis (glycogenin); metabolism

(glycolysis, ATP-dependent proteolysis, and

protein ubiquitination); transport (cation and

intracellular protein); cell growth and



organogenesis (ethylene mediated

unidimensional cell growth); gene regulation

(chromatinmodification, RNA processing, and

transcription factors); response to



biotic/abiotic stresses (response to salt stress);

signal transductionothers (gravitropism,

and biological processes unknown)



Biosynthesis (ATP, lignins, translation, and ribosome biogenesis and assembly); metabolism

(amino acids; lipids, prolines, steroids, and proteolysis); transport (calcium ion, cations,

electrons, and potassium ion); cell growth and organogenesis (embryonic development

ending in seed dormancy, fruit development, microtubule-based process, unidimensional cell

growth, cellulose and pectin-containing cell wall modification, tubulin folding, cytokinesis,

and cellulose and pectin-containing cell wall loosening); gene regulation (transcription

factors); photomorphogenesis (response to red or far red light); respond to biotic/abiotic

stresses (disease resistance, cold); signal transduction; DNA biogenesis ( DNA repair,

mismatch repair); others (regulation of GTPase activity, vesicle docking during exocytosis,

circadian rhythm, and biological processes unknown)

Biosynthesis (carbohydrates, and unsaturated fatty acids); metabolisms (carbohydrates,

lipid glycosylation, proteins, fatty acid beta-oxidation, proteolysis, photorespiration);



transport (protein import into peroxisome matrix); cell growth and organogenesis

(embryonic development ending in seed dormancy, and peroxisome organization and

biogenesis); gene regulation (DNA methylation, genetic imprinting, and transcription

factor); response to biotic/abiotic stresses (defense response); signal transduction;



others (protein folding, protein amino acid glycosylation, and

 biological processes unknown)



Metabolism (carbohydrates); transportcell growth and organogenesis

(flower development and organogenesis); gene regulation (transcription

factors); response to biotic/abiotic stresses (temperature stimulus);

others (protein modification process, N-terminal protein myristoylation,

and biological processes unknown)



Biosynthesis (histidine, tryptophan, and proteins); transport (anions, and

electron); cell growth and organogenesis (root hair elongation); gene



regulation (transcription factors); others (biological processes unknown

Biosynthesis (acetyl-CoA, ethylene, fatty acids, and lipid A); metabolism (D-ribose

metabolic process, and glycolysis,); transport (electron, mitochondrial, and

vesicle-mediated); cell growth and organogenesis (cell proliferation, actin

filament-based process, structural constituent of cytoskeleton, microtubule-based

process, and vacuole organization and biogenesis); gene regulation (transcription

factors); photomorphogenesis (red, far-red, light signaling pathway, response to

red light, negative regulation of photomorphogenesis, response to far red light,

short-day photoperiodism, and negative regulation of flower development);



response to biotic/abiotic stresses (response to cold); signal transduction (small

GTPase mediated signal transduction); DNA biogenesis (DNA repair); others 

(N-terminal protein myristoylation, and biological processes unknown)

Biological processes for the putative si-RNA targets overlapping at two or more dpa stages of ovule development:

biosynthesis (proteins, fatty acids, and flavonoid); metabolism (carbohydrates, gluconeogenesis, glycolysis, 

serine-isocitrate lyase pathway, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate catabrolism, aerobic glycerol catabolism, anaerobic glycolysis, 

non-phosphorylated glucose catabolism, acetate fermentation, glucose catabolism to D-lactate and ethanol, glucose 

catabolism to butanediol, glucose catabolism to lactate and acetate, protolysis, ATP-dependent proteolysis, and 

medium-chain fatty acid); transport (amino acids, auxin polar, electrons, and oligopeptides); cell growth and 

organogenesis (cell proliferation, cell wall modification, microtubule-based movement, multicellular organismal

 development, pollen wall formation, and regulation of progression through cell cycle); 



gene regulation (transcription factor); response to phytohormones (auxin and ethylene stimuli); 

response to biotic/abiotic stresses (defense response, light stimulus, salt stress and wounding); 

signal transduction (salicylic acid mediated signaling pathway); others (cellular calcium ion homeostasis; protein 

amino acid dephosphorylation and protein amino acid phosphorylation; protein folding; protein modification 

process, N-terminal protein myristoylation, positive gravitropism, and biological processes unknown)

Biosynthesis (polysaccharides); metabolism(ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolism,

aromatic compounds, carbohydrates, glucans, phosphatidylcholine, nitrogen compounds,

nucleobases, nucleosides, nucleotides and nucleic acids, and proteolysis); transport

(amino acids, sulfates, and vesicle-mediated); cell growth and organogenesis (shoot

development, cell adhesion, cellulose and pectin-containing cell wall biogenesis,

microtubule cytoskeleton organization and biogenesis, pollen tube growth, and cell

morphogenesis); photomorphogenesis (photoperiodism, response to light stimulus, and

regulation of flower development); response to phytohormones (auxin and cytokinin

stimuli); response to biotic/abiotic stresses (defense response to nematode); signal

transduction (intracellular signaling cascade, and two-component signal transduction

system); DNA biogenesis (DNA repair and replication); others (protein amino acid

phosphorylation, biological processes unknown)

2

1



4

9

8



3

10

6



7

0

5



Figure 7: Annotation of biological processes targeted by abundant copy (

>5 copies) candidate siRNAs of developing ovules in cotton. To

better visualize the specific and overlapping putatively targeted proteins at 0 to 10 DPA ovules, Cytoscape [

43

] was used to generate genetic



interaction networks of putative targets at di

fferent DPA stages of ovule, where each node (DPA) and its edges (targeted proteins) were

colored. The interaction networks were depicted using Cytoscape’s “spring embedded layout algorithm” for both full protein target dataset

and protein groups targeted by only abundant copy candidate siRNAs, importing the “simple interaction format (SIF) files” into Cytoscape.

SIF files were created based on specific and overlapping target protein information for 0–10 DPA ovule stages [

33

].



(3) Select RNA fragment(s) to be purified and cut it

(them) from the gel as shown in

Figure 8

.

(4) Place the gel slice in a 1.5 mL tube and crush with a



glass rod. (Note: we have had very good results using

the 1.5 mL tubes and disposable pestles from Kontes

Glass Company.)

(5) Add 200



μL IDT sterile, nuclease-free water and

continue to crush the gel into a fine slurry. Place the

tube at 70

C for 10 minutes.



(6) Following manufacturer’s recommendations, prepare

a Performa DTR column for each gel slice.

(7) Vortex the gel slurry, transfer the entire volume onto

the column and spin at 3000 rpm for 3 minutes.

(8) Discard the DTR column.

(9) Add 3



μL 10 mg/ml glycogen, 25 μL of 3M NaOAc

(pH5.2), and 900



μL ice cold 100% EtOH to the

eluent. Mix by inversion and place at

80



C for 20

minutes.


(10) Spin tubes at full speed (

10 000 rpm) for 10 minutes



to pellet the RNA. Pour o

ff the supernatant and dry

the pellet.

(11) Proceed to next procedure/application (e.g., miRCat

protocol).

This protocol successfully removes the Urea and

other salts with substantially less loss of RNA than is

seen with conventional crush and soak methods fol-

lowed by NAP-5 column desalting or by dialysis meth-

ods. Detail list of small RNA cloning products and

protocol for miRCat can be found from IDT prod-

uct manual at (

http://www.idtdna.com/Support/Technical/

TechnicalBulletinPDF/miRCat User Guide.pdf

).


International Journal of Plant Genomics

11

5.8s rRNA



tRNAs

Gel Slice

21-mer miSPIKE™ 

control RNA

Total RNA

5s rRNA


Figure 8

Acknowledgments

Cotton small RNA characterization research was funded by

Academy of Sciences of Uzbekistan under research Grant

4F-P-149. The authors are grateful to the United States

Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Services

(USDA/ARS)—Former Soviet Union (FSU) Scientific Coop-

eration Program, O

ffice of International Research Programs,

USDA/ARS for financial support of cotton genomics research

in Uzbekistan. The authors thank anonymous reviewers of

the manuscript for valuable suggestions.

References

[1] C. Napoli, C. Lemieux, and R. Jorgensen, “Introduction of

a chimeric chalcone synthase gene into petunia results in

reversible co-suppression of homologous genes in trans,” The



Plant Cell, vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 279–289, 1990.

[2] A. R. van der Krol, L. A. Mur, M. Beld, J. N. M. Mol, and A.

R. Stuitje, “Flavonoid genes in petunia: addition of a limited

number of gene copies may lead to a suppression of gene

expression,” The Plant Cell, vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 291–299, 1990.

[3] N. Romano and G. Macino, “Quelling: transient inactivation

of gene expression in Neurospora crassa by transformation

with homologous sequences,” Molecular Microbiology, vol. 6,

no. 22, pp. 3343–3353, 1992.

[4] C. Cogoni and G. Macino, “Isolation of quelling-defective

(qde) mutants impaired in posttranscriptional transgene-

induced gene silencing in Neurospora crassa,” Proceedings of the



National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America,

vol. 94, no. 19, pp. 10233–10238, 1997.

[5] A. Fire, S. Xu, M. K. Montgomery, S. A. Kostas, S. E. Driver,

and C. C. Mello, “Potent and specific genetic interference by

double-stranded RNA in Caenorhabditis elegans,” Nature, vol.

391, no. 6669, pp. 806–811, 1998.

[6] G. Meister and T. Tuschl, “Mechanisms of gene silencing by

double-stranded RNA,” Nature, vol. 431, no. 7006, pp. 343–

349, 2004.

[7] R. C. Lee, R. L. Feinbaum, and V. Ambros, “The C. elegans

heterochronic gene lin-4 encodes small RNAs with antisense

complementarity to lin-14,” Cell, vol. 75, no. 5, pp. 843–854,

1993.

[8] B. Wightman, I. Ha, and G. Ruvkun, “Posttranscriptional



regulation of the heterochronic gene lin-14 by lin-4 mediates

temporal pattern formation in C. elegans,” Cell, vol. 75, no. 5,

pp. 855–862, 1993.

[9] M. Lagos-Quintana, R. Rauhut, W. Lendeckel, and T. Tuschl,

“Identification of novel genes coding for small expressed

RNAs,” Science, vol. 294, no. 5543, pp. 853–858, 2001.

[10] N. C. Lau, L. P. Lim, E. G. Weinstein, and D. P. Bartel, “An

abundant class of tiny RNAs with probable regulatory roles in



Caenorhabditis elegans,” Science, vol. 294, no. 5543, pp. 858–

862, 2001.

[11] R. C. Lee and V. Ambros, “An extensive class of small RNAs in

Caenorhabditis elegans,” Science, vol. 294, no. 5543, pp. 862–

864, 2001.

[12] B. J. Reinhart, E. G. Weinstein, M. W. Rhoades, B. Bartel, and

D. P. Bartel, “MicroRNAs in plants,” Genes & Development, vol.

16, no. 13, pp. 1616–1626, 2002.

[13] T. Du and P. D. Zamore, “microPrimer: the biogenesis and

function of microRNA,” Development, vol. 132, no. 21, pp.

4645–4652, 2005.

[14] D. H. Kim and J. J. Rossi, “Strategies for silencing human

disease using RNA interference,” Nature Reviews Genetics, vol.

8, no. 3, pp. 173–184, 2007.

[15] L. Aagaard and J. J. Rossi, “RNAi therapeutics: principles,

prospects and challenges,” Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews,

vol. 59, no. 2-3, pp. 75–86, 2007.

[16] D. P. Bartel, “MicroRNAs: genomics, biogenesis, mechanism,

and function,” Cell, vol. 116, no. 2, pp. 281–297, 2004.

[17] V. N. Kim, “Small RNAs: classification, biogenesis, and

function,” Molecules and Cells, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 1–15, 2005.

[18] C. Tissot, “Analysis of miRNA content in total RNA prepa-

rations using the Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer,” Agilent Tech-

nologies, Palo Alto, Calif, USA,

http://www.chem.agilent.com/

Library/applications/5989-7870EN.pdf

.

[19] E. Berezikov, E. Cuppen, and R. H. A. Plasterk, “Approaches to



microRNA discovery,” Nature Genetics, vol. 38, supplement 6,

pp. S2–S7, 2006.

[20] C. Lu, B. C. Meyers, and P. J. Green, “Construction of small

RNA cDNA libraries for deep sequencing,” Methods, vol. 43,

no. 2, pp. 110–117, 2007.

[21] H. Fu, Y. Tie, C. Xu, et al., “Identification of human fetal liver

miRNAs by a novel method,” FEBS Letters, vol. 579, no. 17, pp.

3849–3854, 2005.

[22] H. A. Ebhardt, E. P. Thi, M.-B. Wang, and P. J. Unrau,

“Extensive 3 modification of plant small RNAs is modulated

by helper component-proteinase expression,” Proceedings of

the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of

America, vol. 102, no. 38, pp. 13398–13403, 2005.

[23] S. Pfe

ffer, M. Lagos-Quintana, and T. Tuschl, “Cloning of small

RNA molecules,” in Current Protocols in Molecular Biology, F.

M. Ausubel, R. Brent, R. E. Kingston, et al., Eds., vol. 4, pp.

26.4.1–26.4.18, John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY, USA, 2003.

[24] J. M. Cummins, Y. He, R. J. Leary, et al., “The colorectal

microRNAome,” Proceedings of the National Academy of



Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 103, no. 10, pp.

3687–3692, 2006.

[25] S. Pfe

ffer, A. Sewer, M. Lagos-Quintana, et al., “Identification

of microRNAs of the herpesvirus family,” Nature Methods, vol.

2, no. 4, pp. 269–276, 2005.



12

International Journal of Plant Genomics

[26] A. Aravin and T. Tuschl, “Identification and characterization

of small RNAs involved in RNA silencing,” FEBS Letters, vol.

579, no. 26, pp. 5830–5840, 2005.

[27] P. Y. Chen, H. Manninga, K. Slanchev, et al., “The develop-

mental miRNA profiles of zebrafish as determined by small

RNA cloning,” Genes & Development, vol. 19, no. 11, pp. 1288–

1293, 2005.

[28] V. E. Velculescu, L. Zhang, B. Vogelstein, and K. W. Kinzler,

“Serial analysis of gene expression,” Science, vol. 270, no. 5235,

pp. 484–487, 1995.

[29] J. Pak and A. Fire, “Distinct populations of primary and

secondary e

ffectors during RNAi in C. elegans,” Science, vol.

315, no. 5809, pp. 241–244, 2007.

[30] S. Gri

ffiths-Jones, “miRBase: the microRNA sequence

database,” Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 342, pp.

129–138, 2006.

[31] S. Gri

ffiths-Jones, H. K. Saini, S. van Dongen, and A. J.

Enright, “miRBase: tools for microRNA genomics,” Nucleic

Acids Research, vol. 36, database issue, pp. D154–D158, 2008.

[32] V. Ambros, B. Bartel, D. P. Bartel, et al., “A uniform system for

microRNA annotation,” RNA, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 277–279, 2003.

[33] I. Y. Abdurakhmonov, E. J. Devor, Z. T. Buriev, et al., “Small

RNA regulation of ovule development in the cotton plant, G.

hirsutum L.,” BMC Plant Biology, vol. 8, article 93, pp. 1–12,

2008.


[34] S. Brenner, M. Johnson, J. Bridgham, et al., “Gene expression

analysis by massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) on

microbead arrays,” Nature Biotechnology, vol. 18, no. 6, pp.

630–634, 2000.

[35] M. Margulies, M. Egholm, W. E. Altman, et al., “Genome

sequencing in microfabricated high-density picolitre reactors,”



Nature, vol. 437, no. 7057, pp. 376–380, 2005.

[36] E. R. Mardis, “The impact of next-generation sequencing

technology on genetics,” Trends in Genetics, vol. 24, no. 3, pp.

133–141, 2008.

[37] P. Parameswaran, R. Jalili, L. Tao, et al., “A pyrosequencing-

tailored nucleotide barcode design unveils opportunities for

large-scale sample multiplexing,” Nucleic Acids Research, vol.

35, no. 19, p. e130, 2007.

[38] M. Hamady, J. J. Walker, J. K. Harris, N. J. Gold, and R. Knight,

“Error-correcting barcoded primers for pyrosequencing hun-

dreds of samples in multiplex,” Nature Methods, vol. 5, no. 3,

pp. 235–237, 2008.

[39] J. G. Ruby, C. Jan, C. Player, et al., “Large-scale sequencing

reveals 21U-RNAs and additional microRNAs and endoge-

nous siRNAs in C. elegans,” Cell, vol. 127, no. 6, pp. 1193–1207,

2006.


[40] J. M. Rothberg and J. H. Leamon, “The development and

impact of 454 sequencing,” Nature Biotechnology, vol. 26, no.

10, pp. 1117–1124, 2008.

[41] R. L. Strausberg, S. Levy, and Y.-H. Rogers, “Emerging DNA

sequencing technologies for human genomic medicine,” Drug

Discovery Today, vol. 13, no. 13-14, pp. 569–577, 2008.

[42] C. A. Hutchinson, “DNA sequencing: bench to bedside and

beyond,” Nucleic Acids Research, vol. 35, no. 18, pp. 6227–6237,

2007.


[43] M. S. Cline, M. Smoot, E. Cerami, et al., “Integration of bio-

logical networks and gene expression data using Cytoscape,”



Nature Protocols, vol. 2, no. 10, pp. 2366–2382, 2007.

[44] E. Pettersson, J. Lundeberg, and A. Ahmadian, “Generations

of sequencing technologies,” Genomics, vol. 93, no. 2, pp. 105–

111, 2009.

[45] J. Shendure, G. J. Porreca, N. B. Reppas, et al., “Accurate

multiplex polony sequencing of an evolved bacterial genome,”



Science, vol. 309, no. 5741, pp. 1728–1732, 2005.

[46] C. Lu, S. S. Tej, S. Luo, C. D. Haudenschild, B. C. Meyers,

and P. J. Green, “Elucidation of the small RNA component of

the transcriptome,” Science, vol. 309, no. 5740, pp. 1567–1569,

2005.

[47] C. Lu, K. Kulkarni, F. F. Souret, et al., “MicroRNAs and other



small RNAs enriched in the Arabidopsis RNA-dependent RNA

polymerase-2 mutant,” Genome Research, vol. 16, no. 10, pp.

1276–1288, 2006.

[48] I. R. Henderson, X. Zhang, C. Lu, et al., “Dissecting Arabidop-

sis thaliana DICER function in small RNA processing, gene

silencing and DNA methylation patterning,” Nature Genetics,

vol. 38, no. 6, pp. 721–725, 2006.

[49] K. Nobuta, C. Lu, R. Shrivastava, et al., “Distinct size

distribution of endogenous siRNAs in maize: evidence from

deep sequencing in the mop1-1 mutant,” Proceedings of the



National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America,

vol. 105, no. 39, pp. 14958–14963, 2008.

[50] R. Sunkar, X. Zhou, Y. Zheng, W. Zhang, and J.-K. Zhu,

“Identification of novel and candidate miRNAs in rice by high

throughput sequencing,” BMC Plant Biology, vol. 8, article 25,

pp. 1–17, 2008.

[51] Q.-H. Zhu, A. Spriggs, L. Matthew, et al., “A diverse set of

microRNAs and microRNA-like small RNAs in developing

rice grains,” Genome Research, vol. 18, no. 9, pp. 1456–1465,

2008.


[52] P. Chellappan and H. Jin, “Discovery of plant microRNAs and

short-interfering RNAs by deep parallel sequencing,” Methods



in Molecular Biology, vol. 495, pp. 121–132, 2009.

[53] E. J. Devor and P. B. Samollow, “In vitro and in silico

annotation of conserved and nonconserved microRNAs in the

genome of the marsupial Monodelphis domestica,” Journal of



Heredity, vol. 99, no. 1, pp. 66–72, 2008.

[54] J. E. Endrizzi, E. L. Turcotte, and R. J. Kohel, “Genetics,

cytology, and evolution of Gossypium,” Advances in Genetics,

vol. 23, pp. 271–375, 1985.

[55] J. F. Wendel and R. C. Cronn, “Polyploidy and the evolutionary

history of cotton,” Advances in Agronomy, vol. 78, pp. 139–186,

2003.

[56] A. H. Paterson and R. H. Smith, “Future horizons: biotech-



nology of cotton improvement,” in Cotton: Origin, History,

Technology, and Production, C. W. Smith and J. T. Cothren,

Eds., pp. 415–432, John Wiely & Sons, New York, NY, USA,

1999.

[57] H.-B. Zhang, Y. Li, B. Wang, and P. W. Chee, “Recent advances



in cotton genomics,” International Journal of Plant Genomics,

vol. 2008, Article ID 742304, 20 pages, 2008.

[58] Z. J. Chen, B. E. Sche

ffler, E. Dennis, et al., “Toward sequencing

cotton (Gossypium) genomes,” Plant Physiology, vol. 145, no.

4, pp. 1303–1310, 2007.

[59] H. J. Kim and B. A. Triplett, “Cotton fiber growth in planta

and in vitro. Models for plant cell elongation and cell wall

biogenesis,” Plant Physiology, vol. 127, no. 4, pp. 1361–1366,

2001.


[60] A. H. Paterson, “Sequencing the cotton genomes,” in Proceed-

ings of the 4th World Cotton Research Conference (WCRC ’07),

D. Ethridge, Ed., p. 2154, Lubbock, Tex, USA, September 2007.

[61] C. X. Qiu, F. L. Xie, Y. Y. Zhu, et al., “Computational

identification of microRNAs and their targets in Gossypium

hirsutum expressed sequence tags,” Gene, vol. 395, no. 1-2, pp.

49–61, 2007.



International Journal of Plant Genomics

13

[62] B. Zhang, Q. Wang, K. Wang, et al., “Identification of cotton



microRNAs and their targets,” Gene, vol. 397, no. 1-2, pp. 26–

37, 2007.

[63] M. Y. Khan Barozai, M. Irfan, R. Yousaf, et al., “Identification

of micro-RNAs in cotton,” Plant Physiology and Biochemistry,

vol. 46, no. 8-9, pp. 739–751, 2008.

[64] I. Y. Abdurakhmonov, E. Devor, and A. Abdukarimov,

“Molecular cloning and characterization of tissue expressed

microRNAs in cotton, G. hirsutum L.,” in Proceedings of the



15th Plant and Animal Genome Conference, p. 820, San Diego,

Calif, USA, January 2007.

[65] M. J. Axtell and D. P. Bartel, “Antiquity of microRNAs and

their targets in land plants,” The Plant Cell, vol. 17, no. 6, pp.

1658–1673, 2005.


Submit your manuscripts at

http://www.hindawi.com

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

http://www.hindawi.com

Volume 2014

 Anatomy 

Research International

Peptides


International Journal of

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

http://www.hindawi.com

Volume 2014

Hindawi Publishing Corporation 

http://www.hindawi.com



 International Journal of

Volume 2014

Zoology

Hindawi Publishing Corporation



http://www.hindawi.com

Volume 2014

Molecular Biology 

International 

Genomics

International Journal of

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

http://www.hindawi.com

Volume 2014

The Scientific 

World Journal

Hindawi Publishing Corporation 

http://www.hindawi.com

Volume 2014

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

http://www.hindawi.com

Volume 2014

Bioinformatics

Advances in

Marine Biology

Journal of

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

http://www.hindawi.com

Volume 2014

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

http://www.hindawi.com

Volume 2014

Signal Transduction

Journal of

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

http://www.hindawi.com

Volume 2014

BioMed 

Research International



Evolutionary Biology

International Journal of

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

http://www.hindawi.com

Volume 2014

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

http://www.hindawi.com

Volume 2014

Biochemistry 

Research International

Archaea

Hindawi Publishing Corporation



http://www.hindawi.com

Volume 2014

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

http://www.hindawi.com

Volume 2014

Genetics 

Research International

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

http://www.hindawi.com

Volume 2014

Advances in

Virology


Hindawi Publishing Corporation

http://www.hindawi.com

Nucleic Acids

Journal of

Volume 2014

Stem Cells

International

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

http://www.hindawi.com

Volume 2014

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

http://www.hindawi.com

Volume 2014

Enzyme 


Research

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

http://www.hindawi.com

Volume 2014

International Journal of

Microbiology




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling