In today’s session, participants will


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This content was produced under U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, Award No. H325A120003. Bonnie Jones and David Guardino serve as the project officers. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the positions or polices of the U.S. Department of Education. No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service, or enterprise mentioned in this website is intended or should be inferred.

  • This content was produced under U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, Award No. H325A120003. Bonnie Jones and David Guardino serve as the project officers. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the positions or polices of the U.S. Department of Education. No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service, or enterprise mentioned in this website is intended or should be inferred.



In today’s session, participants will:

  • In today’s session, participants will:

  • Share accomplishments from institutions of higher education (IHEs) who are successfully integrating Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT) into their educator preparation programs.

  • Reflect on CRT principles and how they can be integrated into educator preparation coursework.



Michael Orosco, Ph.D., author of CEEDAR’s knowledge paper and innovation configuration on Culturally Responsive Teaching

  • Michael Orosco, Ph.D., author of CEEDAR’s knowledge paper and innovation configuration on Culturally Responsive Teaching

  • Angela López-Velásquez, Ph.D., Southern Connecticut State University

  • Donald Easton-Brooks, Ph.D., professor and Dean of the University of South Dakota School of Education



Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Students: What Educator Preparation Programs Need to Do to Support Teacher Learning

  • Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Students: What Educator Preparation Programs Need to Do to Support Teacher Learning

  • The Priority

  • State Practice Highlights

  • Leveraging the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA)



Growing “minority” population: 55% by 2025 (U.S. Department of Education, 2015)

  • Growing “minority” population: 55% by 2025 (U.S. Department of Education, 2015)

  • National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reading and mathematics scores in 2015

  • Overrepresentation in special education

  • High suspension and expulsion rates

  • How are our teachers prepared to address these inequities?



CRT benefits



Inadequate teacher preparation

  • Inadequate teacher preparation

  • Cultural learning gap between teachers and students

  • Evidence-based practices are not synonymous with CRT.



CRT values students’ cultural and linguistic resources, and views these as assets to build upon rather than deficits to be overcome through schooling.

  • CRT values students’ cultural and linguistic resources, and views these as assets to build upon rather than deficits to be overcome through schooling.

  • CRT measures student development in multiple ways, in addition to standardized test scores.

  • CRT highlights the importance of strong and warm working relationships among school participants and serves as cultural organizer, mediator, and orchestrator of social contexts.

  • CRT helps students and families bridge borders between home and school cultures.



Evidence-based practice (EBP) is the conscientious and judicious use of current best evidence in conjunction with professional expertise and students’ values to guide educational decisions.

  • Evidence-based practice (EBP) is the conscientious and judicious use of current best evidence in conjunction with professional expertise and students’ values to guide educational decisions.

  • Best evidence includes empirical evidence from randomized controlled trials and evidence from other scientific methods such as descriptive and qualitative research.

  • When enough research evidence is available, the practice should be guided by research evidence in conjunction with professional expertise and student values.

  • As more research is done in a specific area, the research evidence must be incorporated into the EBP.







Southern Connecticut State University

  • Southern Connecticut State University



Context:

  • Context:

  • Mandatory teacher certification course on supporting English learners (ELs) in the regular education classroom.

  • Only 1.5 credits: 18 instructional hours.

  • All certification candidates take this course.



Role of native language in English academic development.

  • Role of native language in English academic development.

  • Introduction to ELs’ funds of knowledge (González, Moll, & Amanti, 2005).

  • Cultural Relevance and Prior Knowledge taught as important principles in teaching ELs (Levine & McCloskey, 2013).

  • Provision of abundant comprehensible input (departing from ELs academic, linguistic, life knowledge) and scaffolding.

  • Application of principles to a lesson plan designed to include ELs with different levels of English proficiency.

  • High expectations  Lesson must demonstrate opportunities provided to ELs to reach the same academic standards as non-ELs.



Heightened emphasis on:

  • Heightened emphasis on:

    • Expanded definition of cultural relevance for students (might not be the same for two students).
    • ELs’ native language, life experiences, and personal interests as capital, not as a barrier to learning (Aceves & Orosco, 2014).
    • Funds of knowledge—deeper exploration and opportunities.
    • Social justice, political consciousness, and advocacy.
  • Addition of Connecticut English Language Proficiency (CELP) Standards to lesson plan assignment.



Time! Short course: Limits time to dedicate to…

  • Time! Short course: Limits time to dedicate to…

    • Exposing teacher candidates to more experiences with CRT.
    • Providing timely feedback on instructional design.
    • Increased field experience.


University of South Dakota School of Education

  • University of South Dakota School of Education



CRT Expert Keynote With General University Community and Special Guests

  • CRT Expert Keynote With General University Community and Special Guests

  • Workshop With School of Education Faculty and Other Invited Faculty

  • Workshop With School Partners



Professional Development Course for Teachers (taught by USD faculty)

  • Professional Development Course for Teachers (taught by USD faculty)

  • SOE Diversity Committee and Curriculum Reform



Partnership With Sioux Falls School Leaders

  • Partnership With Sioux Falls School Leaders

  • Partnership With State and Priority Schools

  • Diverse Educator Pathway Program



CEEDAR IC on CRT

  • CEEDAR IC on CRT

  • CEEDAR Evidence Standards

  • CEEDAR Policy and Practice Brief on Culturally Responsive Teaching



Please share your experience!

  • Please share your experience!

  • Questions?

  • Comments?



Aceves, T. C., & Orosco, M. J. (2014). Culturally responsive teaching (Document No. IC-2). Gainesville, FL: University of Florida, The CEEDAR Center. Retrieved from http://ceedar.education.ufl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/culturally-responsive.pdf

  • Aceves, T. C., & Orosco, M. J. (2014). Culturally responsive teaching (Document No. IC-2). Gainesville, FL: University of Florida, The CEEDAR Center. Retrieved from http://ceedar.education.ufl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/culturally-responsive.pdf

  • Artiles, A. J., Trent, S. C., & Palmer, J. (2004). Culturally diverse students in special education: Legacies and prospects. In J. A. Banks & C. M. Banks (Eds.), Handbook of research on multicultural education (2nd ed., pp. 716–735). San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass.

  • Donovan, M. S., & Cross, C. T. (2002). Minority students in special and gifted education. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

  • Dunn, L. M. (1968). Special education for the mildly retarded: Is much of it justifiable? Exceptional Children, 35(1), 5–22.

  • Klingner, J. K., Artiles, A. J., Kozleski, E., Harry, B., Zion, S., Tate, W., & Riley, D. (2005). Addressing the disproportionate representation of culturally and linguistically diverse students in special education through culturally responsive educational systems. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 13(38), 1–43. Retrieved from http://epaa.asu.edu/ojs/article/view/143

  • U.S. Department of Education. (2015, March 15). Achievement gap narrows as high school graduation rates for minority students improve faster than rest of nation [Press release]. Retrieved from http://www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/achievement-gap-narrows-high-school-graduation-rates-minority-students-improve-faster-rest-nation

  • U.S. Department of Education. (2016). Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Retrieved from http://www.ed.gov/ESSA




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