International and Cultural Psychology For other titles published in this series, go to


Download 3.52 Kb.

bet8/31
Sana17.11.2017
Hajmi3.52 Kb.
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   31

Implications for Global Psychology
In this chapter, two theoretical arguments were examined to test the idea that culture 
plays  a  critical  role  in  the  shaping  of  creative  behaviors.  The  first  model  was 
derived  from  Triandis’s  (1994)  work,  whereas  the  second  model  came  from 
Simonton’s  (1996)  work.  Triandis  (1994)  presented  a  theoretical  framework  for 
studying human behavior in the context of culture and ecology. He suggested that 
both the ecology and the history of people in a certain region shape culture. Culture 
in turn shapes human personality through socialization in its own unique ways, and 
personality  determines  human  behavior.  This  is  not  to  rule  out  individual  differ-
ences, or to present culture as a tyrannical force, since humans shape culture, albeit 
slowly, as much as culture shapes humans. Adapting Triandis’s framework, Bhawuk 
(2003a) argued that culture has a direct influence on creative behavior. Socialization 
is the mechanism through which cultures operate, and, therefore, it can be assumed 
to be implicit in a culture. He posited that depending on how a culture historically 
evolves in its ecological niche, people in that culture would invest their efforts in 
choosing creative behaviors. Though all kind of creative behaviors can be found in 
all cultures, it is my position that in some cultures people value creative behaviors 
in certain areas more so than in other cultures. And in India people seem to value 
spirituality so much that every domain of human endeavor seems to be shaped by 
spirituality to some degree.

41
Implications for Global Psychology
The second theoretical argument is derived from the stream of research done by 
Simonton  (1996),  who  also  builds  on  Kroeber’s  works.  Kroeber  (1944)  studied 
eight  areas  of  human  endeavors,  i.e.,  philosophy,  science,  philology,  sculpture, 
painting, drama, literature, and music across many literate societies, which included 
both Eastern and Western cultures. He concluded that since geniuses in many areas 
of human endeavor appear in clusters, and that they are distributed such that there 
is a rise and fall in the quality of what they produce, one could argue that “culture 
patterns” (p. 762) have a conceptual validity. Following Kroeber, Simonton (1996) 
concluded in a historiometric study of Japanese geniuses that genius is shaped by 
the cultural configuration. He found that both domain-specific and systemic (i.e., 
cross-domain) configurations determine how a genius or eminent achiever would 
be placed historically, and that these configurations operate independently and may 
have different loci of influence.
In the Kroeberian paradigm, a cultural configuration was also found to reach its 
acme and exhaust itself over a period of time. On the contrary, spirituality and spiri-
tual knowledge and practice have grown over the centuries in India leading to many 
innovations, supporting the thesis that cultures continue to produce geniuses in one 
or more areas of human endeavor that they particularly value, and that some cultural 
configurations may actually never exhaust themselves, if the domains for achieve-
ment  are  so  valued.  The  current  innovations  discussed  in  the  three  case  studies 
could also be used as an argument to support the idea that the Indian culture is not 
showing signs of exhaustion with respect to spirituality.
From the work of Simonton (1988, 1996) and Kroeber (1944), it is clear that 
culture plays an important role in the development of geniuses. These scholars have 
also called into question the Galtonian view of hereditary genius. Simonton (1988, 
1996) has marshaled evidence in support of the Kroeberian configurations, and the 
Kroeberian  or  Simontonian  (Simonton,  1984,  1994)  proposition  that  geniuses 
appear in a local configuration, or new innovations are a result of the social situation, 
suggests that cultures develop specialized knowledge in certain areas. Therefore, it 
appears that culture moderates creative behavior. This perspective allows geniuses 
to have innate abilities, but postulates that culture moderates the channeling of the 
individual abilities to certain creative behaviors, i.e., geniuses put their creativity in 
domains that is valued in the culture.
It is also clear from the work of Kroeber and Simonton that there are differences 
in  the  numbers  of  geniuses  found  across  various  fields  within  a  culture,  which 
supports the argument that culture favors certain fields over others and the idea that 
a  culture  may  indeed  “specialize”  in  a  certain  domain  of  human  behavior.  Also, 
such differences among India, Japan, and China, which are all collectivist cultures, 
show  how  a  culture  theory  like  individualism  and  collectivism  is  unable  to 
explain cultural variation in creativity, and there is a need to study behaviors in 
their cultural contexts. Research in indigenous psychology can enrich our under-
standing of how human behaviors are embedded in cultural contexts beyond what 
cross-cultural psychology can offer.
In  the  Western  tradition  of  research,  creativity  has  been  a  subject  of  much 
research  internationally,  leading  researchers  to  talk  about  a  creativity  movement 
(Guilford, 1980). Much of the research in creativity has focused on intelligence and 

42
2 Spirituality in India: The Ever Growing Banyan Tree 
personality (Barron & Harrington, 1981), problem solving (Osborn, 1953), genius 
(Simonton, 1984), organizational creativity (Amabile, 1988), how innovations are 
made in such domains as music and art (Meyer, 1967), and how creativity can be 
taught in schools (Raina, 1980). However, very little effort has gone into examining 
the influence of culture on creativity.
The analysis presented in this chapter shows that creativity in India is likely to 
be channeled in the field of spirituality, more so than in any other field. Two theo-
retical arguments were presented for studying the influence of culture on creativity. 
The historical analysis of growth of spirituality in India supported the model that 
ecology  and  history  shape  culture,  which  in  turn  influences  creative  behaviors. 
Considering that many of the masters have spent an extended period of time in the 
Himalayas, it is likely that this part of the Indian ecology influenced the growth of 
spirituality. It is plausible that the harsh climate in the Himalayas and the seclusion 
from civilization help mendicants in withdrawing their mind inward.
The case studies presented above support the argument that India continues to 
innovate in the field of spirituality even today. The Indian case presents preliminary 
evidence to support the idea that people in some cultures may value some aspect of 
human endeavor more than others, and thus culture moderates creative behaviors, 
or where geniuses will put their effort. This idea also finds support in the work of 
Simonton (1988, 1996), though he did not explicitly recognize this notion.
The historical analysis of growth of spirituality in India and the three case studies 
allows  us  to  synthesize  the  two  theoretical  perspectives  into  a  general  model  of 
culture  and  creativity.  It  is  clear  that  culture  provides  the  zeitgeist  for  creative 
behaviors  and  influences  the  area  of  creative  behavior  that  geniuses  in  a  culture 
choose. However, geniuses also go on to shape the zeitgeist and culture in the long 
term in a significant way. Thus, culture, zeitgeist, and genius have reciprocal rela-
tionships in shaping creative behaviors (Bhawuk 2003a; see Figure 
2.1
).
History 
Genius 
Ecology 
Zeitgeist   
Culture 
Creative 
Behaviors 
Figure 2.1
 
A general model of culture and creativity

43
Implications for Global Psychology
Kroeber  (1944)  concluded  that  culture  periodically  allows  or  inhibits  the 
 realization of genius. I disagree with the inhibition argument and posit that what 
people value in a culture will never be inhibited; rather, culture will find a way 
around the prevalent context to deliver geniuses. The growth of Sufism in India 
reflects how spirituality emerged at the confluence of Hinduism and Islam in the 
medieval times. The growth in the travel of the spiritual gurus from the Himalayas, 
the traditional home of spiritual masters, to the Western countries may be another 
way Indian spirituality is struggling to assert itself in the global world, which is 
becoming increasingly materialistic. Following this line of reasoning, it could be 
argued that India will continue to produce spiritual geniuses (of which Maharishi 
Mahesh  Yogi  and  Rajneesh  discussed  in  this  chapter  are  recent  examples)  and 
may  even  attract  spiritual  geniuses  from  other  parts  of  the  world  in  its  fold  of 
which  Mother  Teresa  may  be  a  recent  example.  Mother  Teresa’s  Nobel  Prize 
could  be  argued  to  be  recognition  of  Indian  spirituality,  since  she  is  the  only 
Catholic saint to receive this prize, albeit in the form that the sponsors of the Prize 
can relate to.
Study of genius is only one way of looking at what a culture values and where 
it directs (or lures!) its best human resource. The influence of culture can also 
be seen at the mass level (Pandey, 1998), what Kroeber (1944) referred to as the 
unrealized  geniuses  (“…eminently  superior  individuals  [who]  never  get  into 
the  reckoning  of  history  …,”  p.  14).  Spirituality  can  be  seen  to  permeate  the 
masses  in  India,  and  social  life  revolves  around  rituals  that  work  as  a  symbolic 
reminder  that  people  in  this  culture  value  spirituality.  Small  (e.g.,  weekly,  fort-
nightly, and annual) and big (e.g., the kUmbh melA, or festival of kUmbh, which 
meets every 12 years and draws millions of people, both householders and monks, 
to a particular place) celebrations mark the Indian lifestyle. Everyday is dedicated 
to a deity and one can choose a deity to offer his or her prayer. It is no surprise that 
India is promoted for spiritual tourism.
Creativity  is  not  captured  by  most  of  the  culture  theories  (see  Triandis  & 
Bhawuk, 1997 for a succinct review of culture theories). It is not clear how creativity 
is  related  to  individualism  and  collectivism  or  any  of  the  other  four  dimensions 
presented by Hofstede (1980, 2001), i.e., masculinity versus femininity, uncertainty 
avoidance, long-term orientation or Confucianism, and power distance. The topic 
has generally not received much attention. Schwartz’s (1992) universal value struc-
ture is the only one that touches upon creativity, but no effort has been made to use 
his theory to explain how culture shapes creativity. One could argue that creativity 
is a socio-cultural behavior, since creativity is applied to solve social problems or 
ecological problems that a culture faces. For example, when India was facing the 
British rule, many spiritual gurus addressed the issue of independence, and spiritu-
ality was channeled through the idea that service to the nation was part of spirituality. 
Since creativity can be construed as a socio-cultural behavior, as is apparent from 
the study of geniuses, it is important to study the influence of culture on creativity, 
else we may make the mistake of imposing the Western notion of creativity on other 
cultures and find people in other cultures not creative. Therefore, future research 
should examine the socio-cultural aspects of creativity.

44
2 Spirituality in India: The Ever Growing Banyan Tree 
We need to critically examine such sweeping generalizations as individualists 
are more creative than collectivists (Triandis, 1989), or the United States is good at 
inventing, whereas Japan is good at refining what is already invented (Hasegawa, 
1995). It is plausible that people in different cultures value different outcomes, and 
hence, would encourage people to channel their creativity in different domains of 
behaviors.
Galton’s Hereditary Genius Thesis, which conceptualizes genius as natural ability 
that  is  inherited,  could  be  called  into  question  using  the  argument  that  culture 
shapes the behavior of geniuses, which was presented in this chapter. The Indian 
case clearly challenges the hereditary genius thesis since a spiritual guru, traditional 
wisdom, as well as written scriptures have it, brings saMskAra (or innate abilities) 
from the karma of his or her own past life, and does not inherit from his or her 
biological  parents.  The  examination  of  many  recorded  lineage  of  spiritual  paths 
found  in  India,  and  captured  in  Table 
2.1
,  also  clearly  contradicts  the  hereditary 
argument that Galton was able to demonstrate by using his long list of geniuses 
(Galton, 1869). The wide variation in the castes from which spiritual gurus have 
come also supports the traditional wisdom and contradicts the Galtonian view.
Research in indigenous psychology calls for adopting a diversity of methodolo-
gies, beyond the experimental method favored by Western psychology and social 
sciences. In this chapter, I followed all the four types of triangulation recommended 
for qualitative studies (Patton, 2002). I used “methods triangulation” (using more 
than  one  method,  i.e.,  historical  analysis  and  case  method),  “triangulation  of 
source” (the table of saints was created by using many sources, and the cases were 
culled from more than one source), and “theory/perspective triangulation” (Triandis 
and  Simonton’s  theoretical  perspectives  were  synthesized  to  present  the  general 
model of culture and creativity). I also attempted “analyst triangulation” (Patton, 
2002,  p.556)  by  obtaining  feedback  from  expert  Indologists  as  well  as  Western-
educated Indians to check if they would agree with my thesis. It was encouraging 
to find that they all agreed with my thesis that the Indian culture values spirituality 
and tends to direct geniuses to that domain.
I also used story telling, which has been accepted as a research tool, in narrating 
the stories of the three modern saints. Churchman (1971, p. 178) posited that “The 
Hegelian inquirer is a storyteller, and Hegel’s Thesis is that the best inquiry is 
the inquiry that produces stories. The underlying life of a story is its drama, not 
its ‘accuracy.’ …But is storytelling science? Does a system designed to tell stories 
well also produce knowledge?” Stories can be used for amusement or for inquiring 
about basic human psychology, the desires, hopes, aspirations, fears, and so forth 
of people. Mitroff and Kilman (1978, p. 93) argued that stories “provide the hardest 
body  of  evidence”  for  researchers  who  they  labeled  the  Conceptual  Humanist, 
scientists who strive to increase the welfare of the most number of people. The three 
cases  presented  in  the  chapter  give  us  a  better  understanding  of  the  spiritual 
masters, and the wide difference between what they did and how they did, which 
could not be understood if we did not know their “stories.”
It should be noted that since only humans are known to be spiritual in the animal 
kingdom, by neglecting this field of human endeavor, we may be actually leaving 

45
Implications for Global Psychology
out one of the most important aspects of being human from social science research. 
We can see that an attempt to understand why spirituality is valued in the Indian 
culture  has  led  to  the  development  of  a  general  model  of  culture  and  creativity, 
which was unlikely to emerge if we followed the traditional Western research para-
digm. Thus, research in indigenous psychology is likely to provide new paradigms 
and models that cannot be developed following the Western research tradition.

wwwwwwwwwwwwwwww

47
D.P.S. Bhawuk, Spirituality and Indian Psychology, International and Cultural Psychology, 
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4419-8110-3_3, © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011
Introduction
Worldview is shaped by culture, and worldview directs the choice of conceptual 
models,  research  questions,  and  what  we  do  professionally  as  a  social  scientist. 
This chapter examines the Indian culture vis-à-vis the culture of science. First the 
thesis that science has a culture is laid out by recognizing the defining attributes of 
science. Then the Indian worldview of who we are and what we should be doing is 
presented, followed by an examination of how this view interacts with the culture 
of  science  and  what  is  called  scientific  thinking.  Research  on  Transcendental 
Meditation  (TM)  is  presented  as  a  vehicle  to  examine  the  interaction  between 
Indian cultural worldview and what is called scientific thinking. Implications of this 
interaction  for  studying  human  value  system  for  cultural  researchers  and  global 
psychology are discussed.
Worldview shapes what is “interesting” (Davis, 1971) to a great extent to a particular 
audience, what is considered a problem, what problem is interesting to study, and 
whether the goal of studying a problem is to analyze the problem, to analyze and 
solve the problem, or to analyze, solve, and implement the solution. Davis argued 
that all theories in social sciences become false over time, because they are simpli-
fications of reality. He contended that some social science theories are less false 
than others. A theory is accepted in social science because it is “interesting,” and 
they persist because of their interestingness, sometimes even after they are refuted. 
Davis’ ideas are provocative, and they have great significance in that culture shapes 
what  is  considered  interesting  to  a  great  deal.  For  example,  though  Western 
researchers do not consider spirituality an important research topic, it is of great 
interest  to  Asian  scholars.  Davis  himself  falls  into  the  cultural  trap  when  he 
concludes that all of the propositions that he examined were interesting only if they 
negated an existing one. This itself may be an aspect of Western culture. There lies 
the threat, even for cross-cultural researchers, in that they may make the mistake of 
studying concepts that are interesting (only!) from their own cultural perspective.
Chapter 3
Model Building from Cultural Insights
 

48
3 Model Building from Cultural Insights 
Research by Nisbett, Peng, Choi, and Norenzayan (2001) indicates that cognitive 
processes differ across cultures in fundamental ways (e.g., in the process-content 
distinction) because they are shaped by different social systems. Nisbett et al. found 
East  Asians  to  be  holistic  in  their  causal  analysis  and  dialectic  in  reasoning, 
whereas Westerners are more analytic and tend to use formal logic. Thus, worldview 
shapes our cognition, and culture shapes our worldview. Our worldview not only 
directs the choice of conceptual models, research questions, and methods of inquiry 
(Danziger, 1990), but also what we do professionally as social scientists. We are 
all  also  shaped  by  the  culture  of  science,  which  is  founded  on  rationality  and 
empiricism.  Cultural  researchers,  by  virtue  of  being  both  scientists  and  cultural 
scholars, are well suited to examine the interaction between the culture of science 
and other indigenous cultures, and examine human behavior in the context of this 
dynamic interaction.
Culture of Science
Research  methodology  textbooks  capture  the  most  commonly  shared  under-
standing of how science is done. The acceptance of a textbook is dependent on how 
well it captures the common denominator of accepted practices. Therefore, research 
methodology  textbooks  can  serve  as  a  reliable  source  where  we  can  find  the 
distilled characteristics of science. One textbook (Rosenthal & Rosnow, 1991) noted 
Precision, Accuracy, and Reliability as three important characteristics of science. It is 
believed that science creates unambiguous knowledge by measuring facts with preci-
sion, describing findings accurately, and following procedures (or using instruments) 
that are reliable. These three characteristics serve as the foundation of experimental 
work in science as well as in the social science. This necessarily leads to the study 
of facts and events that are quantifiable, measurable, and manipulable. If precision, 
accuracy, and reliability cannot be used, no scientific study can be carried out.
When we discuss the basic tenets of science, or the culture of science, we must keep 
in mind that the culture of science, like any other culture has evolved over the years, 
and some of its elements were more prominent at some point in time and then lost their 
value to some other elements. Probably, the earliest conflict in value that scientists 
faced  was  about  being  objective  versus  subjective,  about  being  impersonal  versus 
personal. Through a long struggle, science has established objectivity and imper-
sonalness as its basic tenets, though it has not been an easy journey, even for science.
There has always existed set of antitheses or polarities, even though, to be sure, one or the 
other was at a given time more prominent – namely between the Galilean (or more prop-
erly, Archimedean) attempt at precision and measurement … and, on the other hand, the 
intuitions, glimpses, daydreams, and a priori commitments that make up half the world of 
science in the form of a personal, private, “subjective” activity (Holton, 1973, p. 375).
Scientists share a worldview, which assumes that “science rejects the indeter-
minate” (Bernard, 1957, p. 55). When it comes to methodology to solve difficult 
problems, they believe in breaking down the problem in smaller parts and studying 
them in pieces.

49
Culture of Science
When faced by complex questions, physiologists and physicians, as well as physicists and 
chemists,  should  divide  the  total  problem  into  simpler  and  simpler  and  more  and  more 
clearly  defined  partial  problems.  They  will  thus  reduce  phenomena  to  their  simplest 
possible material conditions and make application of the experimental method easier and 
more certain (Bernard, 1957, p. 72).
Thus,  science  rejects  the  indeterminate,  and  scientists  are  objective,  impersonal, 
and believe that the world can be partitioned into smaller parts where the total is 
simply the sum of the parts. For this reason, scientists are criticized to be reductionists 
in their approach in examining and solving problems.
A scientific observation is only valid if two trained observers can come to the 
same conclusion, i.e., arrive at an agreement, about a phenomenon independent 
of  each  other.  Campbell  defined  science  as  “the  study  of  those  judgments 
concerning which universal agreement can be reached (Campbell, 1952, p. 27).” 
Mitroff and Kilman (1978) argued that consensus building is one of the epistemic 
foundations of science, and they categorized scientists who believe in this as the 
“analytic scientist.” They criticized this approach to science by raising questions 
about lack of agreement on the meaning of the terms: “judgment,” “universal,” 
“agreement,” and “study.” They posited that it was possible to have disagreement, 
yet do scientific studies in social science, and questioned why science could not 
be  founded  on  disagreement.  Criticism  aside,  science  is  characterized  by 
scientists’  belief  in  creating  agreement  among  them  about  what  “truth”  is.  For 
example, physicists would create agreement about what gravitation is, what latent 
heat of evaporation is, and so forth. Psychologists would create an agreement, for 
example, about how a person with a certain personality type is likely to behave 
in  a  certain  situation.  Management  scholars  might  attempt  to  create  agreement 
about what is an effective organizational strategy under rapid or slow changes in 
the environment.
Another foundation of science lies in the belief that science is value-free, and 
scientific knowledge comprises impersonal facts from which disinterested theories 
are constructed. Though both the impersonal nature of facts and the disinterested 
nature  of  theories  are  found  to  be  lacking  in  science  (Churchman,  1961;  Kuhn, 
1962; Mitroff, 1974; Rander & Winokur, 1970), social scientists generally believe 
them to be the characteristics of science.
Science  also  regards  logic  as  something  basic.  For  example,  The  Law  of 
Contradiction, i.e., no proposition can be both true and false at the same time, and 
The  Law  of  Excluded  Middle,  i.e.,  every  proposition  is  either  true  or  false,  are 
taken as axioms, something that is irrefutable. If these fundamentals are contra-
dicted  then  the  experience  or  fact  itself  is  to  be  labeled  as  distortion  or  error 
(Mitroff & Kilman, 1978).
Scholars have criticized this notion for some time. For example, Haack (1974, 
p. 15) argued that at least in principle logic should not be viewed as infallible 
and absolute, “… none of our beliefs, the laws of logic included, is immune from 
revision in the light of experience. According to this view, it is at least theoretically 
possible that we should revise our logic.”
Mitroff and Kilman (1978, p. 53) concluded that “in order to label something a 
scientific theory, we must be able to cast it into a logical form so that given the 

50
3 Model Building from Cultural Insights 
proper  antecedent  conditions  (X,  A),  we  can  make  a  valid  deduction  (Y).”  They 
further stated that what is generally accepted as scientific requires that all scientific 
theories follow this form of reasoning, and whatever does not fit this cast is dismissed 
as nonscientific.
Dewey  characterized  scientists  as  having  “an  obsessive  quest  for  certainty” 
(Dewey, 1960, p. 244) and blamed them for pursuing certainty to the degree that 
they ignore the inherent uncertainty in natural processes. Thus, pursuing certainty 
in the face of inherent uncertainty is another defining attribute of science. We find 
this pursuit of certainty in the work of Campbell and Stanley (1966), who presented 
eight  threats  to  internal  validity  in  establishing  whether  a  certain  variable  is  the 
cause  of  an  outcome  (X  causes  Y).  Their  work  has  become  the  foundation  of 
research methodology in social sciences and goes without much criticism. However, 
some  scholars  have  questioned  whether  there  are  other  sets  of  criteria  that  are 
equally meaningful. For example, Mitroff and Kilman (1978) examined these criteria 
and concluded that there are other desirable criteria that can be used to conduct 
a  study,  including  experimental  designs.  They  argued  that  avoiding  these  eight 
threats necessarily leads one to the control-group-experimental-design as the only 
viable  research  method  for  doing  scientific  research.  They  raised  an  interesting 
question, whether the same experimental design would be selected if other research 
criteria were used, and posited that there are indeed alternative sets of criteria that 
can be used to conduct research, and that these alternative criteria did not lead to 
the  experimental  design.  They,  thus,  concluded  that  “selection  of  any  particular 
experimental design is not automatic but is a function of one’s worldview [emphasis 
added]  as  well  as  a  response  to  particular  technical  requirements”  (Mitroff  and 
Kilman, p. 47).
Argyris (1968) presented a severe critique of the traditional controlled experi-
mental design on two grounds. First, he argued that the controlled experiment is 
tyrannical much like the assembly line where workers have no control over their 
work. He argued that under such repressing settings the subjects often withdraw 
psychologically from the experiment and give wrong answers. The second ground 
for criticism deals with generalizability, and he argued that the findings from such 
experimental settings cannot be generalized to the real world and can only be valid 
for similar repressive settings.
Champions of science glorify it on many counts. Some argue that science is the most 
fundamental of all disciplines, and only science, not art or literature, offers continuous 
progress, so much so that human progress entirely depends on it (Sarton, 1962).
In almost every case wherever there is progress or a possibility of progress, this is due to 
science and its applications. I would never claim that science is more important than art, 
morality, or religion, but it is more fundamental, for progress in any direction is always 
subordinated to some form or other of scientific progress (Sarton, 1962, p. 45).
We can say that science is characterized by its core values of rejection of the 
indeterminate, objectivity, impersonalness, and the belief that the world can be 
partitioned  into  smaller  parts  where  the  total  is  simply  the  sum  of  the  parts. 
Science  is  about  creating  agreement  among  scientists  about  what  “truth”  is. 

51
Culture of Science
Science is value-free, and scientific knowledge comprises impersonal facts from 
which disinterested theories are constructed. Science pursues certainty and uses 
The Law of Contradiction (i.e., no proposition can be both true and false at the 
same time) and The Law of Excluded Middle (i.e., every proposition is either 
true or false). Science strives to get at the cause of certain outcomes and follows 
the logic, “If (X, A), then (Y).” Scientific method and practices are characterized 
by experimentation, measurement, precision, accuracy, reliability, and replication. 
Scientists compete for grants, and competition symbolizes hierarchy in method 
and outcomes. Practitioners of science believe that scientific discoveries are the 
most  fundamental  elements  of  progress  in  human  civilization.  There  is  much 
hero  worship  in  science,  and  names  of  Newton,  Marie  Curie,  Einstein,  Louis 
Pasteur, Chandrasekhar, and Bose draw adulation and awe. Thus, science has all 
the  elements  of  culture  –  values,  heroes,  and  practices  –  (Hofstede,  Neuijen, 
Ohayv, & Sanders, 1990), and these characteristics define the cultural boundaries 
of science. Since science is defined as everything rational, this may be the only 
known  culture  that  has  a  rigorous  formal  and  definitive  boundary.  But  the 
practice of science is much like any culture with much variation in its informal 
culture (Hall, 1959) (Figure 
3.1
).
Method/ Practices
HEROES
Values 
• Newton 
• Marie Curie  
• Einstein 
• Louis Pasteur 


Chandrasekhar 
Bose 
• Impersonalness 
• Objectivity 
• Rejection of the indeterminate  
•  Belief that the world can be 
  partitioned into smaller parts where the 
  total is simply the sum of the parts 
• Creating agreement among scientists 
• Value free 
• Pursuit of certainty 
• Law of excluded middle 
• Law of contradiction 
• Precision 
• Accuracy 
• Reliability 
• Experiment 
• Measurement 
• Grants 
• Replication 

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   31


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling