International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology


Download 24.32 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet137/176
Sana05.12.2019
Hajmi24.32 Mb.
1   ...   133   134   135   136   137   138   139   140   ...   176

4. Conclusion 

To sum up, taking into consideration the fact of modern pupils’ passion for online platforms, we can 

insist on the possibility of converting this phenomenon to advantage by organizing interaction at lessons and 

inventing  tasks  on  the  basis  of  social  networking  services,  in  particular,  of  their  integral  elements  – 

nicknames. In order to acquire a language one should, first of all, practice his or her skills in speaking (both 

in oral and written form), and the interaction between all the members of the educational process at lessons 

functions to the benefit that way. It allows mastering all the skills and abilities, which are indispensable for a 

modern communicant, to the fullest extent possible. 



References 

Alyoshina,  A.B.  (2016).  Creative  competence’s  development  of  foreign  students  during  the  speech 

improvement lessons. Literacy, 10 (64), 169-171.  

Asmus,  N.G.  (2005).  Characteristic  linguistic  properties  of  the  virtual  communicative  space:  extended 

abstract  of  dissertation  in  support  of  candidature  for  a  philological  degree:  10.02.19  [Place  of  the  thesis 

defense: Chelyabinsk Federal University], Chelyabinsk. 

Bakshaeva N.A., Verbitskiy A. A. (2006). Psychology of motivation of students. Moscow: Logos Publ. 

boyd,  d.  m.  (2007).  Social  Network  Sites:  Definition,  History,  and  Scholarship.  Journal  of  Computer-

Mediated Communication, 13, 210-230. 

https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1083-6101.2007.00393.x

 

Danilov, A.V. (2011). Social networking services as an Internet game: rules, forms of organization, dynamics. 



Bulletin of Mordovia State University, 1, 195-197. 

Dvulichanskaya,  N.N.  (2011).  Interactive  methods  of  teaching  as  the  means  of  key  competences’ 

development. Science and education, 4, 1-10.  

Efimova, R.U. (2011). Organizational and educational games at the lessons of foreign language. Innovative 



International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



756 

 

 

 



projects and programs in the field of education, 6, 58-64.  

Ilchinskaya, E.P. (2015). Peculiarities  of the  use of social networking  services during classes of the English 

language at university. Historical and socio-educational thought, 6 (2), Volume 7, 261-262.  

Kret,  M.V.  (2013).  Case-study  in  the  framework  of  teaching  professional  foreign  language  at  university. 

North Caucasian Psychological Bulletin, 11 / 2, 42-46. 

Moolenaar,  N.M.  (2012). Social  Networks in  Education:  Exploring  the  Social  Side  of  the  Reform  Equation. 

American Journal of Education, 1, 1-6. 

https://doi.org/10.1086/667762

 

Onorin,  D.E.  (2016).  The  influence  of  social  networking  services  on  the  process  of  teaching  a  foreign 



language.  Bulletin  of  the  Perm  State  Humanitarian-Pedagogical  University.  Series  1.  Psychological  and 

pedagogical sciences, 2 (2), 168–175. 

 

 

 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



757 

 

 

 



Teaching Foreign Languages to the Seniors: Significant Components of the 

Course Development Process  

 

Lesya V. Viktorova



1

,  

Valeriy A. Lashkul

2



Oleksandr S. Lahodynskyi

3



Olha V. Nitenko

4

 and 

Elina A. Sablina

5

 

1 Department of Social Pedagogy and Information Technologies, National University of Life and Environmental 

Sciences of Ukraine, Ukraine. 

2 Department of Roman and Germanic Languages and Translation, National University of Life and Environmental 

Sciences of Ukraine, Ukraine. 

3 Department of Foreign Languages, Military Diplomatic Academy named after Yevheniy Bereznyak. 

4 Department of Foreign Languages, Military Diplomatic Academy named after Yevheniy Bereznyak, Ukraine. 

5 Department of International Relations, Military Diplomatic Academy named after Yevheniy Bereznyak, Ukraine.

 

Abstract 

The  article  sets  out  practical  implications  for  developing  a  foreign  language  course  for  the  seniors 

(people at the age of 60 and above) based on the theory and practice of education for adults (andragogy) and 

seniors (geragogy) as well as on the authors’ experience of developing and conducting such a course in the 

system  of  non-formal  education  in  Ukraine  (university  of  the  third  age).  It  proposes  a  three-staged 

procedure  of  course  development  including  learners’  needs,  wants,  and  capabilities  analysis,  program 

preparation, its running and evaluation. These components of foreign language course development process 

for  the  seniors  were  selected  by  the  group  of  experts,  represented  by  the  teaching  staff  of  the  leading 

Ukrainian higher educational institutions. The first component of the foreign language course development 

is designed to derive information from the learners on the purpose and motivation of their foreign language 

learning including their age peculiarities, and learning styles, based on their individual and psychological 

differences. The second component is an organizational stage, aimed at writing a course program through 

setting  objectives,  organization  of  content  and  lesson  planning.  The  course  program  should  adequately 

reflect  seniors  needs,  wants,  and  capabilities  in  communicative  real-life  situations  included  into  exercises 

and activities. The final stage  – course running and evaluation  – is the implementation of course program 

through the principles of flexibility, individual approach, focus on learners’ interests, integration of language 

skills, and providing constant feedback. These principles consider senior learners’ basic attitudes and ways 

of learning foreign languages at the universities of the third age. The three described significant components 

are the bedrock for foreign language course development process within the system of non-formal education 

of the senior learners. 



Keywords:  seniors,  foreign  languages,  course  development  process,  program  preparation,  non-formal 

education 



1.  Introduction 

Depopulation  and  rapid  aging  of  population  are  among  today’s  major  global  problems.  Besides, 

knowledge and skills of professionals in all areas get outdated so quickly that they need constant renewal 

whereas lifelong education can be the only solution to the problem. Teaching and learning foreign languages 

takes a significant place  in the education of adults  –  andragogy. Because speaking foreign languages  is so 

important to the adults’ career, their teaching and learning has taken a variety of forms with the pedagogical 

techniques primarily based on the learners’ professional activities. 

At the same time, another category of adults – older adults or seniors – are becoming more and more 

enthusiastic  about  learning  foreign  languages.  Moreover,  in  many  countries  of  the  world  this  category  of 

population remains socially active and shows quite good results in foreign language learning. They regard 

foreign languages as the key means of intercultural communication both on-line and in live during traveling 

and meeting new people.  

Taking into consideration the opportunities being open now for  the seniors  of post-Soviet countries 

for  traveling  abroad,  more  and  more  people  try  to  learn  foreign  languages alone  or  in  the  system  of  non-



International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



758 

 

 

 



formal education in order to communicate with other people. For many of them learning foreign languages 

has become a hobby with a strong level of motivation for it.  

Therefore, for teachers and course developers it has become a real problem how to make such courses 

useful and valuable. Basically, it is connected with the following problems. On the hand, it is hard to define 

the age when adults become seniors but in our research we consider them a population beyond age of sixty, 

still  productive  but  on  the  verge  of  retirement  or  already  retired.  This  age  is  difficult  in  terms  of  human 

learning  skills  especially  those  related  to  learning  foreign  languages.  It  is,  primarily  connected  with  the 

abilities  to  remember  words  and  grammar  (memory  capacity),  pronunciation,  and  quick  reaction  to  the 

dialogue in conversations. At the same time, most of these people previously learned foreign languages at 

schools  and  turned  to  be  unsuccessful  which  can  have  a  considerable  negative  impact  on  further  foreign 

language  learning  at  older  age.  On  the  other  hand,  these  people  have  various  motivations,  i.e.  different 

needs  for  communication  foreign  languages.  It  leads  to  many  questions  on  what  they  want  to  do  with  a 

foreign  language  they  try  to  learn,  which  skills  (speaking,  reading,  writing  or  listening)  are  of  a  higher 

priority  for  them.  Because  of  unsuccessful  past  experiences  in  foreign  language  learning,  many  seniors, 

mistakenly,  consider  communicative  approach  to  language  learning  not  appropriate  to  them.  In  their 

opinion, only the ability of translation can allow them to understand foreign languages.  

Overall,  teaching  foreign  languages  to  the  seniors  requires  approaches  which  can  not  be  similar  to 

those  applied  to  the  kids  or  other  categories  of  adults.  Besides,  this specific  category  of  population  varies 

from country to country having their cultural peculiarities deeply embedded in foreign language  learning 

abilities. Ukrainian seniors as many seniors in the post-Soviet environment add up their own peculiarities to 

the process of foreign language learning basically connected with their previous foreign language learning in 

the system of Soviet educational institutions.  



2.  Literature Review 

Education of adults has always been under research of many scholars who tried to give definitions of 

this category of learners. Here we can find various views. The basic one is that adults are people who can 

take socially significant roles and able to accept responsibility for their lives (Darkenwald & Merriam, 1982). 

Principles  of  adults’  education  (andragogy)  versus  teaching  children  (pedagogy)  were  laid  by 

M. Knowls (1970). He recognizes the leading role of  adult learner in educational process, consciousness of 

learning, application of  life and professional experience, aimed at solving vital  problems. Practically adult 

learners  are  autonomous,  self-directed,  goal-oriented,  having  high  level  of  motivation  and  life  experience 

they  refer  to  while  learning.  At  the  same  time,  in  the  work  of  L. Turos  (1999)  we  find  concept  ‘general 

andragogy’  and  a  whole  range  of  disciplines it encompasses,  depending  on  the  social,  age  or  professional 

category of adults.   

Based  on  these  principles,  N. Biryukova, S. Yakovleva,   T. Kolesova, L. Lezhnina,   and   A. Kuragina, (2015) 

provide  a  comprehensive  study  on  teaching  foreign  languages  to  adults.  According  to  them,  such 

andragogical principles should be applied in this area as identification of adults’ individual difficulties and 

educational experience; content of teaching meeting their objectives and needs; use of interactive methods of 

teaching;  integration  of  individual  and  group  forms  of  learning  activities  and  establishment  of  connection 

between  adults’  life  and  work;  instructor’s  role  as  a  facilitator.  They  also  study  such  important  issues  as 

barriers  and  motivation,  as  well  as  interactive  teaching  strategies  and  technologies  of  practice-oriented 

approach in foreign languages teaching and learning. 

H. Ctibor  &  S. Grofčíková  (2016)  identify  many  shortcomings  in  the  theory  and  practice  of  teaching 

foreign languages to adults, and elderly people in particular. In addition, they analyze a number of strategic 

documents, programs and legislation creating conditions for lifelong foreign languages education.  

There  are  some  interesting  aspects  on  effects  of  age  and  experience  on  English  pronunciation  by 

Korean  speakers  in  the  article  by  W. Baker  (2010).  Similar  ideas  of  age  peculiarities  of  second  language 

learning  and  teaching  can  be  found  in  the  work  of  S. Krashen,  M. Long,  &  R. Scarcella (1979).  Also,  some 

aspects of foreign languages teaching to adults within the system of military education can be found in the 

work of I. Bloshchynskyi (2017). 

The most substantial work on teaching foreign languages to the seniors is performed by D.R. Gomez 



International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



759 

 

 

 



(2016). The author shows her own teaching experience with older adults from the perspective of geragogy – 

the theory and practice of teaching seniors. She recognizes teaching this category of population challenging, 

offers  interesting  insights  into  the  effect  of  aging  on  memory  and  language,  considering  individual 

differences  of  these  people.  The  major  achievement  of  D.R. Gomez  is  a  research  on  peculiarities  of  senior 

students  in  four  dimensions:  physical,  cognitive,  psychological,  and  experiential.  Later  in  her  book,  the 

author describes a study on the influence of experience based on vocabulary learning strategies conducted 

with older Japanese learners of Spanish. A practical nature of her research includes a pilot course of seven 

lessons on vocabulary, divided into aims, activities and homework. The work also provides a wide range of 

recommendations  and  evaluation  techniques  for  instructors  of  foreign  languages  geragogical  courses.  All 

way  through  the  book,  D.R. Gomez  mentions reservations  of  her  research  on  ‘foreign  language  geragogy’ 

due to the lack of wider experimental studies. 

On the whole, although andragogy is rather developed in terms of concepts and methods of teaching 

this  category  of  population,  the  science  of  foreign  language  teaching  and  learning  of  seniors  remains 

seriously  limited.  It  is  basically  bound  to  some  research  on  age  peculiarities  of  these  people  and 

recommendations to their language training. 

Therefore,  with  this  research  we  aim  to  set  out  the  main  practical  implications  which  should  be 

considered in the foreign language course development for the seniors at the level of non-formal education 

(foreign  languages  schools  or  educational  language  programs  at  universities  (academies)  of  the  third  age 

etc). 

3. Method 

While  carrying  out  the  research  we  were  using  various  methods  at  the  theoretical,  diagnostic,  and 

empirical levels. The theoretical methods include analysis; synthesis; generalization; specification for dealing 

with the scientific sources. The diagnostic methods encompass questionnaires and interviews for collecting 

data  on  the  components  of  the  seniors’  foreign  language  course  development  process.  We  also  used  an 

experts’ assessment  method and  the Thomas Saati Hierarchy Analysis Method  for identifying significance 

coefficient for the components of the seniors’ foreign language course development process. 

3.1. Participants 

The participants of the first stage of the research were 78 teachers of Ukrainian Universities (National 

University  of  Life  and  Environmental  Sciences  of  Ukraine,  Kiev  National  University  named  after  Taras 

Shevchenko, Kiev National Economic University named after Vadym Hetman) who have enough experience 

in  teaching  foreign  languages  to  different  categories  of  students  within  formal  and  non-formal  types  of 

education.  

For  the  second  stage  of  the  research  7  experts  were  carefully  selected  among  the  teachers  of  the 

National  University  of  Life  and  Environmental  Sciences  of  Ukraine  and  Military  Diplomatic  Academy 

named  after  Yevheniy  Bereznyak.  Their  selection  was  based  on  the  considerable  level  of  experience  in 

teaching foreign languages to the adults as well as their scientific background in the area of pedagogy and 

psychology. They are all doctors of sciences and full professors.  

At  the  third  stage  of  the  research  we  looked  at  testing  and  receiving  a  feedback  on  the  foreign 

language course we had previously developed for the seniors. Our participants were 24 volunteers (age from 

60 to 67), mostly females, who were students of the foreign language course at the university of third age).  



3.2. Materials 

In  order  to  carry  out  the  research  we  used  questionnaires  and  interviews  at  the  first  stage  of  the 

research  for  identifying  the  significant  components  of  the  seniors’  foreign  language  course  development 

process.  The  questionnaires  include  questions  to  find  out  information  on  the  aspects  the  teachers  dealing 

with adults take into consideration while developing a foreign languages course for the seniors. Later, the 

data from the questionnaires was thoroughly processed and enhanced with the help of interviews to fill in 

the information gaps. The interviews were carefully developed and conducted with the use of indirect and 

leading questions  



International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



760 

 

 

 



We,  then,  also  used  lists  of  components  we  had  identified  to  be  marked  by  the  experts  as  to  their 

significance  in  order  to  identify  the  significance  coefficient  of  each  component.  At  the  final  stage  of  the 

research we also used feedback forms to understand in detail how successful the course was for the students. 

3.3. Procedure 

At the first stage of the research we selected 10 basic components which, in the view of the experts, 

should be applied to the process of foreign language course development for the seniors. They were shaped, 

based  on  the  answers  the  experts  provided  to  the  questions  we  asked  them  on  how  better  to  plan  and 

organize  such  a  course.  These  components  represent  the  best  summary  of  the  ideas  the  teachers  put 

randomly. So, some of them can overlap. These are the following components:  

X

1

 – selection of resources;  



X

– establishing learners’ motivation;  



X

–analyzing learners’ needs, wants and capabilities; 



X

4

 –creating favorable foreign language communication environment;  



X

– giving feedback on learners’ difficulties;  



X

6

 – preparing a course program;  



X

7

 – reflecting real-life communication topics in the course contents;  



X

8

 –developing exercises;  



X

9

 – course running and evaluation; 



X

10 


– analyzing learners’ previous foreign languages learning experience. 

At the second stage of the research we asked seven experts to assess how significant these components 

can  be  in  the  process  of  foreign  language  course  development  for  the  seniors.  Each  of  the  seven  experts 

compared  components  between  each  other.  They  used  the  scale,  based  on  the  Thomas  Saati  Hierarchy 

Analysis Method. In this case, while comparing components between each other they could give 0.5 points if 

a component being assessed was worse than the one it is compared to. Then, they could give 1 point if the 

two components being assessed were equal. In case, if the component under assessment was better than the 

other  component,  they  could  give  1.5  points.  Then,  the  mean  number  for  each  component  of  the  foreign 

language course development process was calculated. So, as the result we could get the distribution of the 

significance coefficient among the components. 

At  the  third  stage  of  the  research,  we  asked  the  senior  learners about  their  feedback  on  the  foreign 

language  course  they  participated  in.  Because  the  students  were  not  ready  to  answer  the  questions  in 

English,  the  questionnaire  was  presented  in  their  native  language.  We  also  did  not  want  to  make  it  too 

complicated, so we put 10 basic straightforward  questions to  get  simple answers on how the course went 

and how we can improve it in the future. The English version of the questionnaire is presented at table 1. 

Table 1. Students’ questionnaire on the course feedback  

Instructions 

Dear students! 

Thank you very much for the participation in this course. We hope it was interesting and useful 

for  you.  It  was  conducted  for  the  first  time  in  this  format,  so  we  would  like  to  ask  you  some 

questions on how you liked it. We expect honest and objective answers from you. They can help 

us to make this course better in the future. Please, encircle the answers that seem most appropriate 

to the questions we ask you. Also, we would be very grateful to you, if you could give use any 

proposals, comments or observations on the course.    

1. 

Have  you  ever  participated  in  the  foreign  language 



course like this one? 

YES   NO 

2. 

What was you motivation  for this course? (You can give 



several answers) 

 

3. 



Did you like the course? 

YES   NO 

4.  

What did you like about the course most of all? (You can 



choose several answers or give your own)? 

a. the teachers 

b. course materials 

1   ...   133   134   135   136   137   138   139   140   ...   176


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling