International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology


Download 24.32 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet138/176
Sana05.12.2019
Hajmi24.32 Mb.
1   ...   134   135   136   137   138   139   140   141   ...   176

International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



761 

 

 

 



c.  the  way  the  course  was 

prepared and run 

d. other  ________________ 

5. 


What did not you like about the course most of all? (You 

can choose several answers or give your own)? 

a. the teachers 

b. course materials 

c.  the  way  the  course  was 

prepared and run 

d. other  ________________ 

6.  


Do  you  agree  that  this  course  was based  on  your  needs, 

wants and capabilities? 

YES   NO 

7. 


Do  you  agree  that  the  course  program  (contents)  was 

properly prepared? 

YES   NO 

8. 


Do you agree that the course was properly run? 

YES   NO 

9. 

What  do  you  think  should  be  improved  in  this  course? 



(You can give as many proposals as you can) 

 

10. 



Do you have any other comments or observations on the 

course? (You can give as many proposals as you can) 

 

The first two questions were aimed at establishing students’ previous experience in foreign language 



learning  at  the  courses  for  the  seniors  as  well  as  their  purpose  of  learning  at  this  course  driven  by  their 

motivation. These two factors can have a huge effect on the course that we were conducting depending on 

how  positive  their  previous  experience  in  foreign  language  learning  could  be  and  how  strong  motivation 

they could have.  

Questions 3, 4 and 5 were asked to find out senior learners’ overall impression of the course and their 

attitude  to  it.  Pinpointing  things  that  they  liked  and  did  not  like  about  the  course  can  help  us to  identify 

strong and weak points at the course we have conducted. 

By asking question 6 we wanted to know to what extent the foreign language course reflected needs, 

wants  and  capabilities that  would  definitely  help  us to  determine  its usefulness  and  appropriateness.  The 

seventh question gave use an opportunity to look at the course program and its contents. By asking it, we 

wanted to know how adequately it reflected the real-life communicative situations the learners are likely to 

encounter in their future language use. With the eighth question we intended to establish students’ feel on 

teachers’ preparation, organization and conduct of the course.  

Questions 9 and 10 were directly asked to get as many proposals on course improvement as possible.  

All the three stages of the research were conducted with the single aim to identify the most significant 

components of the foreign language course development process for the senior learners. 



4. Results 

The results of components assessment which was conducted at the first stage of the research can be 

seen at table 2.  

Table 2.Components assessment by the experts  

 

 



Components 

Expert 


Expert 


Expert 


Expert 


Expert 


Expert 


Expert 


X

1



 

 

selection of resources 



0.065 

0.086 


0.090 

0.090 


0.087 

0.090 


0.088 

X

2



 

 

establishing  learners’ 



motivation 

0.109 


0.080 

0.090 


0.085 

0.109 


0.091 

0.086 


X

3

 



 

analyzing 

learners’ 

needs,  wants  and 

capabilities 

0.145 


0.144 

0.123 


0.135 

0.121 


0.121 

0.142 


X

4

 



 

creating 

favorable  0.085 

0.090 


0.090 

0.080 


0.087 

0.083 


0.085 

International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



762 

 

 

 



 

 

Components 



Expert 

Expert 



Expert 


Expert 


Expert 


Expert 


Expert 


foreign 


languages 

communication 

environment 

X

5



 

 

giving  feedback  on 



learners’ difficulties 

0.075 


0.080 

0.090 


0.085 

0.075 


0.090 

0.086 


X

6

 



 

preparing  a  course 

program 

0.125 


0.144 

0.133 


0.145 

0.145 


0.144 

0.140 


X

7

 



 

reflecting 

real-life 

communication topics 

in the course contents 

0.075 


0.070 

0.080 


0.085 

0.087 


0.075 

0.080 


X

8

 



 

developing exercises  

0.105 

0.080 


0.090 

0.080 


0.098 

0.090 


0.085 

X

9



 

 

course  running  and 



evaluation 

0.125 


0.155 

0.144 


0.145 

0.140 


0.155 

0.142 


X

10

.   



analyzing 

learners’ 

previous 

foreign 


languages 

learning 

experience  

0.065 


0.069 

0.064 


0.060 

0.087 


0.069 

0.068 


Having received assessments from each expert, we have calculated the significance coefficient for each 

component as an arithmetic mean from the numbers given by each of the seven experts. The results can be 

seen from table 3. 

 

Table 3. Distribution of the significance coefficient among the components 

 

Components 



Significance 

coefficient  

X

1

 



selection of resources 

0.085 


X

2

 



establishing learners’ motivation 

0.093 


X

3

 



analyzing learners’ needs, wants and capabilities 

0.133 


X

4

 



creating  favorable  foreign  languages  communication 

environment 

0.086 

X

5



 

giving feedback on learners’ difficulties 

0.083 

X

6



 

preparing a course program 

0.139 

X

7



 

reflecting  real-life  communication  topics  in  the  course 

contents 

0.079 


X

8

 



developing exercises  

0.090 


X

9

 



course running and evaluation 

0.144 


X

10

 



analyzing  learners’  previous  foreign  languages  learning 

experience  

0.069 

As we can see from both tables, the most significant components are the following: analyzing learners’ 



needs, wants and capabilities; preparing a course program; course running and evaluation. The rest of the 

components are also significant but they can be used as a part of the above three.  

We have also analyzed the results of students’ feedback on the foreign language course (third stage of 

the  research).  They  reveal  that  most  of  the  learners  (24  people,  mostly  females,  who  volunteered  for  an 

English  course  at  the  university  of  third  age  at  the  age  of  60  to  67),  have  already  had  a  foreign  language 

learning  experience,  primarily,  an  unsuccessful  one.  Most  of  them,  made  several  false  attempts  to  master 



International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



763 

 

 

 



English as their foreign language at different stages of their life and career but they have never experienced a 

course for the seniors.  

The  main  purpose  of  their  English  learning  can  be  summarized  in  the  following  areas:  remaining 

socially active with their friends from abroad or making new friends both on-line and traveling to foreign 

countries; filling in free time with pleasant and useful activities (making fun); further use of English in the 

native speaking environment (immigration).  

Almost all of them liked the course and really cared a lot about the type of the teacher they would get 

for  the  course.  Also,  most  of  them  expected  ‘spoon-feeding’  (too  much  attention  from  the  teacher).  70% 

vividly  overestimated  their  self-confidence  in  learning  English  and  needed  extra  help  from  teachers.  This 

example can not be typical for the seniors’ courses in other countries but rather illustrative one for teaching 

foreign languages to the seniors in a post-Soviet environment.  

Most  of  the  senior  learners  wanted  spoken  colloquial  English  for  speaking  on  everyday  topics  and 

hobbies,  primarily,  satisfying  their  basic  speaking  needs.  Therefore,  we  can  make  conclusions  that  the 

foreign  language  course  for  the  seniors  was  based  on  the  real-life  communicative  situations  they  can 

encounter in foreign language communication. 

The basic learners’ proposals were to increase time for the course as well as to make it multi-leveled. 



5. Discussion and Conclusion 

In order to develop an effective foreign languages course for the seniors let us focus on the following 

three  basic  issues for  consideration:  learners’  needs,  wants  and  capabilities  analysis,  program  preparation, 

and course running and evaluation. These components of the foreign language course development process 

are  significant,  particularly  critical  for  foreign  language  teaching  to  the  seniors  as  their  education  is  not 

confined  with  certain  formal  rules and  regulations.  We  can  also  regard  them  as the  stages for  the  foreign 

language course development process. 

Learners’ needs, wants and capabilities analysis component is a fact-finding stage that is detrimental 

for further foreign language course development. It answers three crucial questions: “What do the seniors 

need a foreign language for?”, “To what extend do they want to learn a foreign language?”, “Are they able 

to  learn  what  they  need  and  want?”  In  the  view  of  some  scholars,  this  stage  should  establish  learners’ 

interests and aspirations and can  not be ignored (W. Rivers, 1981, p. 11 − 12).  An interesting point can be 

found in the research of V. Nikolic and H. Cabaj (2000), who compare this stage of foreign language course 

development to inviting guests for dinner where the host should learn about their food preferences. In the 

view of the authors, this stage helps to make a course relevant, adequate, and appropriate for the learners (p. 

47 − 48).  

This is  especially  true  with  the  seniors  as they  take  courses  voluntarily and  pursue  their  individual 

foreign  language  learning  goals.  Both  senior  learners  and  their  teachers  wish  to  make  foreign  language 

learning  and  teaching  as  much  enjoyable  and  beneficial  as  possible.  Certainly,  at  the  same  time,  senior 

learners’ wishes should be realistically measured against their mental and physical capabilities which can be 

limited due to the age influence.  

Another  component  being  selected  by  the  experts  –  a  program  preparation  –  is  not  less  significant. 

There are several terms used to indicate a course program such as ‘curriculum’ and ‘syllabus’. The first one 

is  a  course  outline  for  teaching  at  the  national  or  community  levels  while  the  second  term  means  a 

‘circumscribed  document,  prepared  for  a  group  of  learners.  We  use  term  ‘program’  in  the  meaning  of  a 

context in which a language instruction takes place (F. Dubin& E. Olstain, 1994, p. 3). Here, we include such 

issues as setting objectives, organization of content and lesson planning.  

The final stage of foreign languages course development for the seniors – its running and evaluation – 

can be regarded both as separate or the one integrated into the whole procedure of foreign language course 

development. It finally shows how well the course program went, revealing all the drawbacks which should 

be corrected at the next course. 

In order to see how the foreign language course for the seniors is developed, let us have a closer look 

at its procedure with practical implications derived from our experience of developing and conducting such 

course in Ukraine. 



International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



764 

 

 

 



The best way to establish  learners’ needs,  wants and  capabilities  in foreign languages learning is  to 

ask them directly questions on why they need to learn a foreign language, what they expect from learning 

and how confident they are in doing that. As seniors are very sensitive about all issues connected with their 

learning, this should be done not only prior to the course commencement but also all the way through the 

course  to  make  sure  that  the  learners  really  meet  their  expectations.  If  something  goes  wrong,  the  course 

should be adjusted. 

Our short but very beneficial experience of teaching  older adults in Ukraine provides some hints in 

conducting  this stage of foreign language course development. We find  questionnaires and interviews the 

most useful information-gathering techniques. Because in many cases the seniors appear less expressive in 

putting answers on the paper, we recommend having both filling-in questionnaires and sitting interviews as 

supplementing each other in order to gather better evidence on learners’ needs, wants and capabilities. The 

questions should be developed by the teachers themselves as they can pick up more precise information on 

the issues critical to the further stages of foreign language course development.  

The  best  way  to  organize  the  questionnaires  is  to  provide  not  really  long  but  balanced  sets  of 

questions and  statements for  the  course  applicants.  We  would  recommend  items of  different  types:  open-

ended and multiple choice questions mixed with statements the respondents can agree and disagree with. 

Open-ended questions can lead the respondents either to abundant information about the issue  or, on the 

contrary, to difficulties in hardly providing any. Multiple-choice questions can confine learner’s answers to 

the points exactly needed by the course developers, on the one hand, while on the other hand, they seriously 

restrict the learners in expressing the information. The statements the respondents should agree or disagree 

with are more popular among the seniors especially if they are written from the first person (e.g., I would 

like to learn English to make new friends from abroad). 

The  challenge  is  that  too  long  and  complicated  items can  tire  the  applicants  down  making  answers 

imprecise.  Therefore,  fewer  but  clearly  formulated  questions  can  provide  better  information  about  the 

learners  than  long  and  complex  ones.  Another  challenge  the  teachers  can  encounter  in  dealing  with  the 

seniors  is  their  reluctance  or  refusal  on  providing  any  personal  information  about  their  plans,  aims  or 

previous experiences. This can be found in any types of societies but especially acute among the post-Soviet 

seniors  whose  mentality  is  still  deeply  rooted  in  the  past,  where  any  information  from  a  person  could  be 

turned against him or her. So, the teachers should be prepared to deal with such people. Here, interviews 

with indirect questions can be more effective.  

We  recommend  making  questionnaires  and  interviews  based  on  Communicative  Needs  Processor, 

developed by J. Munby (1978) with our modifications tailored for the seniors. Basically, they should cover 

the following areas: 

learners’ biographical data (exact age; previous foreign languages learning experience); 

foreign languages learning purpose (there can be multiple purposes changing as the course goes on); 

foreign  languages  use  setting  (in  what  environment  the  learners  think  they  will  use  a  foreign 

language; what people they will interact with using a foreign language); 

target level (degree to what the learners expect to learn a foreign language); 

instrumentality  (what  language  the  learners  need  more:  written  versus  spoken;  dialogue  versus 

monologue; productive skills versus receptive); 

learners’  confidence  in  foreign  language  learning  (what  difficulties  the  learners  think  they  may 

encounter in foreign language learning; how they plan to overcome them; degree of preparedness to solve 

problems of foreign language learning); 

learners’  preferences  (likes  and  dislikes  in  foreign  languages  teaching;  approaches  and  techniques; 

learning styles; types of teachers the learners prefer).  

We have used a specially developed questionnaire in order to establish learners’ preferences in terms 

of getting their sensory preferences (establishing visual, auditory and kinesthetic styles), learners’ relations 

with  others  (extraversion  or  introversion),  learner’s  relations  with  ideas  (intuitive  or  concrete/sequential), 

learners’  orientation  to  learning  tasks  (closure  or  openness),  learners’  overall  orientation  (global  or 

analytical).  

Learners’ sensory preferences are likely to affect the way they learn a new foreign language best. For 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



765 

 

 

 



instance, if one of them is a visual person, he/she might rely on the sense of sight and feel more comfortable 

with  reading  than  with  oral  activities.  If  a  learner  is  an  auditory  learner,  he/she  might  prefer  listening  or 

speaking  activities to  reading  assignments.  If  he/she  is  a  hands-on  learner,  then  the  learner  benefits from 

doing  projects  and  moving  around  the  room  a  lot.  If  two  or  all  three  of  learners’  sensory  preferences  are 

equally strong, he/she is flexible enough to enjoy a wide variety of activities. By knowing learners’ sensory 

preferences the teacher can help optimize foreign language learning by giving to the older students activities 

that relate to their sensory preferences. On the other hand, activities that might not be quite as suited to their 

sensory  preferences  –  for  example,  reading  and  writing  exercises for  an  auditory  person  –  will  help  them 

stretch beyond their ordinary “comfort zone”.  

By  establishing  learners’  relations  with  others  the  teachers  will  find  out  how  extroverted  or 

introverted the senior learners are. If a person shows a high level of extroversion, he/she might enjoy a wide 

range  of  social,  interactive  events  in  the  language  classroom  –  games,  storytelling,  role-plays,  and  skits.  If 

he/she is more introverted, he/she might like to do more independent work or might enjoy working in pairs 

with someone he/she knows well. 

Establishing  learners’  relations  with  ideas  help  the  teachers  find  out  how  intuitive  or 

concrete/sequential  the  learners  are.  If  a  senior  learner  is  intuitive,  he/she  might  seek  out  the  major 

principles or rules of the  new language, like to speculate about possibilities (cultural or language-related), 

enjoy  abstract  thinking,  and  avoid  step-by-step  instruction.  He/she  is  much  more  random  in  his/her 

approach  than  his/her  concrete/sequential  group  mates,  who  are  likely  to  prefer  step-by-step  language 

activities and who might engage in a variety of multimedia memory strategies. 

Establishing of orientation to learning tasks helps to know how close or open a senior learner is. If a 

person is higher for closure, it means he/she focuses carefully on all tasks, meets deadlines, plans ahead for 

assignments,  wants  explicit  instruction,  and  asks  for  clear  directions.  If  a  person  is  higher  for  openness, 

he/she  probably  enjoys  “discovery  learning”  in  which  he/she  picks  up  information  on  his/her  own,  and 

might prefer to relax and play with the language, without much concern for deadlines or planning ahead.  

It is also important to find out how global or analytic a learner is. It helps to make foreign language 

classes at the course for seniors interesting and meaningful. If a person is more global, he/she might enjoy 

getting  the  main  idea  of  a  new  language  conversation  or  a  reading  passage  by  guessing  the  meaning  of 

unknown words and might like to use strategies (such as gestures or paraphrasing) for communicating even 

without knowing all the right phrases. But if a person is more analytic, he/she might feel less comfortable 

with these rather holistic techniques and might focus more on language details, logical analysis of grammar 

points, and contrasts between native language and the new language.  

In  fact,  some  data  obtained  from  these  questions  are  objective  (mostly  static  and  can  be  applied  in 

foreign  languages  course  development  without  changes),  while  other  information  is  subjective  and  needs 

constant  monitoring  for  the  course  adjustment.  The  most  important  points  that  should  be  considered  are 

learners’ motivation and how age can affect further learning.  

Despite many controversies among the scholars about the age influence, it is hard to find any evidence 

as to the superiority of younger age for foreign language learning. Older adults in foreign language learning 

may face only a few problems such as poor eyesight, hearing, failing memory, and bad pronunciation. Some 

scholars introduced term ‘fossilization’ to account for the slow down or stopping of language learning that 

the seniors may face (L. Selinker, 1972; X. Wei, 2008). Nevertheless, these drawbacks can be compensated by 

additional  time  and  efforts  the  seniors  are  likely  to  input  in  learning.  These  problems  are  not  easy  to 

establish at the stage of needs, wants and capabilities analysis, therefore, we recommend indirect questions 

on how the learners are confident in foreign languages learning.  

Overall, having got enough data about senior learners’ needs and wants they should be matched with 

their  capabilities  and  further  reflected  in  the  course  program.  We  also  recommend  splitting  learners  into 

small groups (up to five people), based on their language proficiency level (if any) and learning styles. This 

will make the course more efficient as teachers will have more time to focus on each learner.  

Then we start a course writing procedure. In general, we propose to look at the following issues: 

identification of the topics that may be of interest to the senior learners and are based on their needs 

and wants; 

1   ...   134   135   136   137   138   139   140   141   ...   176


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling