International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology


Download 24.32 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet140/176
Sana05.12.2019
Hajmi24.32 Mb.
1   ...   136   137   138   139   140   141   142   143   ...   176

Management Students 

 

Prof. Irina Yu. Pavlovskaya





* and 

Olga Yu. Lankina

2

 

1 Doctor of Philology, Department of Philology, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia 

2 The Institute of Foreign Languages, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia 

*corresponding author

 

Abstract 

The importance of the research is determined by the necessity to find adequate methods to assess and 

develop  Management  B.A.  program  students’  oral  mediation  competence  in  English.  The  issue  is  vitally 

important  for  both  students  and  teachers.  For  students,  because  mediation  skills  can  be  treated  as  part  of 

«soft skills», which have recently become so attractive for the employers. For teachers, mediation is a new 

concept  in  the  paradigm  Reception  -  Production  -  Interaction  –  Mediation  introduced  by  The  CEFR 

Companion  Volume  (2017).  We  consider  both  cognitive  mediation  and  relational  mediation  in  a 

monolingual interactional aspect. Mediation skills are checked in the format of a professional discussion. The 

purpose of the research is: to work out an overall scheme for teaching and testing mediation competence in 

oral  professionally-oriented  performance  at  B2  level  of  English  in  accordance  with  CEFR  descriptors  and 

local educational needs; to pilot it and finally to analyze testing scores statistically. The data show that the 

teaching  materials  prove  to  be  effective  and  lead  to  the  improvement  of  testing  results.  The  scales  are 

validated  and  reliable  for  the  population  of  the  experiment  which  is  representational  for  the  focus group. 

The scheme developed may be used for the departments of Management in tertiary education as well as be 

adapted for other professionally-oriented profiles and languages other than English. 

Keywords: mediation, testing, assessment scales, management, discussion skills   

Introduction 

Mediation is a form of verbal interaction between an intermediary and interested parties and as such 

represents an important way of conveying information: “Mediating language activities  – (re)processing an 

existing  text  –  occupy  an  important  place  in  the  normal  linguistic  functioning  of  our  societies”  (Common 



European Framework…, 2001, p. 14). It is becoming increasingly important to foster mediation skills as part of 

foreign  language  teaching  (Pavlovskaya,  2016).  There  are  several  reasons  for  this,  some  of  the  most 

important  being  (1)  specialization  of  scientific  knowledge  and  (2)  the  necessity  to  convey  technical  or 

professional information (Bashmakova, Ryzhova & Kuznetsova, 2016). 

The  objective  of  this  research  is  to  develop  a  system  of  oral  mediation  assessment  in  English  for 

Content  and  Language  Integrated  Learning  (CLIL)  classes  (2

nd

  year  of  B.A.  Management  programme,  B2 



Level).  

In order to achieve this objective, we do the following:  

1)  analyze  the  definition  of  mediation  and  determine  its  specific  character  in  the  field  of  teaching 

English to Management students; 

2) build up a competence model of oral mediation in accordance with the general academic goals of 

the University Management program;  

3)  analyze  B2  (CEFR)  descriptors  in  order  to  determine  the  skills  necessary  for  an  oral  mediator 

capable of solving professional and linguistic problems

4)  develop  techniques  that  increase  the  oral  mediation  skills  and  test  tasks  in  accordance  with  the 

competence model; 

5) work out scales for evaluating oral mediation test tasks in accordance with the CEFR descriptors, 

and the competence model developed;  

6) pilot the mediation activities and test tasks in a teaching and testing experiments;  

7) analyze the results of the experiments statistically. 

 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



772 

 

 

 



Literature Review 

More and more researchers insist upon the necessity to strive towards forming a tolerant multicultural 

environment (Ter-Minasova, 2000; Elizarova, 2005; Tarnaeva 2012; Coste & Cavalli, 2015; North & Piccardo, 

2016). Mediation can be one of the tools to accomplish that task. The demand for mediation in the modern 

society is widespread and the mediation skills can be tested in oral as well as in written forms, in individual 

and group formats, by means of one (without translation) or two and more languages (translation). Hence: 

we believe that mediation has a great potential for many approaches in the theory and practice of language 

teaching.  

Statements made in this paper are based on a broad spectrum of researches undertaken in Russia and 

beyond in the following relevant fields:   

 1)  foreign  language  teaching  theory  (N. V. Bagramova,  I. A. Bim,  А. А. Verbitskiy,  N. D. Galskova, 

N. I. Gez,  B. A. Glukhov,  I. I. Haleyeva,  M. V. Lyakhovitskiy,  A. A. Mirolyubov,  L. V. Moskovkin, 

E. I. Passov, I. Yu. Pavlovskaya, I. V. Rakhmanov, S. F. Shatilov, A. N. Schoukin); 

2)  cross-cultural  communication  (V.  P.  Furmanova,  M. K. Getmanskaya,  D. B. Gudkov, 

G. V. Elizarova, A. S. Khimicheva, I. N. Khohlova, V. G. Kostomarov, S. G. Ter-Minasova, L. P. Tarnaeva, E. 

M. Vereschagin, L. V. Yarotskaya); 

3)  ESP  pedagogy  in  the  field  of  Management  (M.  I.  Faenson,  N.  M.  Speranskaya,  E. V. Zarutskaya, 

B. Z. Zeldovich); 

4) mediation (N. I. Bashmakova, H. Besemer, T. Bennett, M. Cavalli, D. Coste, Yu. A. Chernousova, T. 

C. Dunne, L. L. Fuller, A. A. Kolesnikov, O. M. Litvishko, R. Taft, V. V. Usov, J. A. Wall); 

5) assessment of communicative skills (J. Ch. Alderson, L. F. Bachman, Т. М. Balikhina, S. R. Baluyan, 

A.  Brown,  C.  Clapham,  G.  Fulcher,  V.  A.  Kokkota,  M. Ya.  Kreer,  K.  S.  Makhmuryan,  B. North,  K.  J. 

O’Loughlin,  A.  S.  Palmer,  J. Panthier,  I.  Yu.  Pavlovskaya,  E. Piccardo,  I. A. Rapoport,  V.  N.  Simkin,  I.  A. 

Tsaturova, J. A. Van Ek, J. L. M. Trim, M. V. Verbitskaya, D. Wall);  

6)  statistical  data  analysis  (V. S. Avanesov,  A.  O.  Grebennikov  L. V. Levtova,  A. A. Maslak, 

T. McNamara, G. Rasch, C. Roever, O. A. Senichkina, N. Verhelst); 

7) psychology and psycholinguistics (A. A. Bodalyov, L. S. Vigotskiy, I. A. Zimnyaja). 

In  this  study,  the  term  “mediation”  is  used  in  the  context  of  foreign  language  teaching  and  testing 

based on the communicative method (Bachman and Palmer (2010), Canale and Swain (1980), Fulcher (2000), 

North  and  Piccardo  (2016)).  In  communicative  linguistics,  mediation  implies  activities  that  make 

“communication possible between persons who are unable, for whatever reason, to communicate with each 

other directly” (CEFR, 2001, p. 14). From this point of view, mediation usually requires interpretation or help 

in assimilating the transferred information. This is accomplished with the  help  of a range  of  skills that an 

experienced  mediator  possesses,  one  of  them  being  the  ability  to  organize  group  work.  Mediation  is  also 

affected  by  sociocultural  factors  that  facilitate  or  impede  the  acquisition  of  new  knowledge  (The  CEFR 

Companion Volume, 2017, p. 99-102). This approach to mediation first proposed in early 1990es (North, 1992) 

became  widespread  later  and  in  2017  was  embodied  in  the  CEFR  Companion  Volume  (2017).    As  a  speech 

activity, mediation exists along with reception, production and interaction in written and oral forms (Ibid. p. 

14).  This  system  of  concepts  is  based  on  the  communicative  approach  to  language  learning.  In  order  to 

understand  the  fundamentals  of  mediation  we  must  determine  its  place  in  that  system.  The  aim  of  the 

communicative approach to language teaching is to make students acquire the communicative competence, 

which  emphasizes  learning  through  mastering  functional  units  of  communication  such  as  questions, 

requests, pieces of advice, complaints, etc. The verbal intention of the speaker underlies their selection of the 

aforementioned basic units of communication and their speech behavior (Azimov & Schoukin, 2009, p. 99). 

In turn, speech behavior manifests itself in communicative situations that are described in terms of domains 

(personal,  social,  professional,  educational)  and  descriptive  categories  (location,  participants,  events  etc.) 

(Common European Framework…, 2001 p. 48-49). Communicative situations also manifest themselves through 

forms of communicative action, which can be grouped into reception of oral and written speech, monologue 

production  in  oral  and  written  forms,  interaction  and  mediation.  Mediation  can  be  both  productive  (e.  g. 

retelling  a  text)  and  interactive  (e.  g.  written  or  oral  translation  of  negotiations).  Thus,  mediation  is  an 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



773 

 

 

 



element  in  a  system  of  concepts  that  defines  the  nature  of  verbal  acts  in  relation  to  the  communicating 

parties. 

Examples of mediation include written or oral translation from one language to another; moderating a 

discussion; interpreting complex abstract concepts; rephrasing, writing a resume, a report, a generalization, 

an annotation, an abstract; writing down information in order to pass it on to another participant of a verbal 

interaction.  

Based on our analysis of the term, we can discern the following components of mediation: (1) oral or 

written  verbal  interaction  with  an  intermediary;  (2)  usage  of  multiple  languages  (translation)  or  one 

language (without translation); (3) creating conditions for assimilating transmitted information. 

The process of mediation is integrated into the sociocultural environment with the aim to achieve the 

best possible result for interacting parties. Because of that, classifying mediation skills requires that we take 

into account not only the information being communicated, but also the conditions providing the success of 

communication, which has become a reason for D. Coste and M. Cavalli (2015) to draw a distinction between 

cognitive and relational mediation.  

Cognitive  mediation  is  defined  as  mediator’s  help  in  understanding  the  substance  of  the  issue, 

concepts being used in another culture or subculture, or circumstances common to that culture. Examples of 

cognitive mediation include explaining the causes of a certain cultural phenomenon, collective production of 

ideas or transfer of existing information, e. g. translation or interpreting data.  

The purpose of relational mediation is creating a favorable environment for communication. Examples 

include  creating  a  multilingual  space,  averting  conflicts,  showing  respect  to  another  culture,  ensuring 

balanced  representation  of  different  parties  and  observing  the  rules  of  polite  behavior.  Creating  a 

multilingual space necessitates the interaction of different cultures or subcultures based on mutual respect 

and according to certain rules of conduct (Coste & Cavalli, 2015, p. 28). 

The  idea  of  accommodating  the  free  will  of  different  individuals  within  society  in  order  to  achieve 

their  peaceful  coexistence  has  been  explored  by  thinkers  such  as  J.-J.  Rousseau,  I.  Kant,  G.  Hegel,  V. 

Solovyov, G. Spenser, M. Weber, etc. The XIX century saw the formation of basic approaches to the problem 

of mediation. V. Solovyov insisted that conflict solving can be achieved through spiritual and moral growth 

of interacting parties. Other approaches included resolving conflicts using the power of reasoning in order to 

bring the conflicting parties closer before or instead of going to court. Materialist philosophers K. Marx and 

F. Engels elucidated the class content of the concept of mediation. They explained the origin and motives of 

peacekeeping  institutions  in  terms  of  conflicting  class  interests,  thus showing  their  social  nature  (Styopin, 

2011) 


The  social  aspect  of  mediation  continued  to  dominate  in  the  works  of  scholars  in  the  XX  century. 

L. Vygotsky  offered  an  explanation  of  mediation  based  on  psychology:  an  individual  develops  culturally 

through mastering tools of mediation, such as sign, symbol, word or myth. It is during that process that the 

higher mental functions of an individual emerge. In this approach, every meaning exists on two levels, the 

individual and the social, and mediation is the process through which the individual aspect is merged with 

the social one. Furthermore, a person learns a language by mediating social concepts (Vigotskiy, 1982).  

Mediation has benefited greatly from studies in the field of legal science in the XX century. From mid-

century  onwards  in  the  USA  mediation  was  institutionalized  as  an  area  of  private  procedural  law,  with 

particular attention to the psychological aspect of mediation and its social importance. L. Fuller was one of 

the first researchers from the field of law science to study mediation. He stressed the difference between a 

mediator and a judge: the latter determines, whether it is necessary to enforce a certain social norm, whereas 

the  former  convinces  the  client  that  it  is  in  their  interest  to  follow  the  norm  (Fuller,  1971).  In  this  case 

mediation involves persuading people and relies on social and cultural norms.  

It is important to note that in the modern world mediation has become a part of everyday life and it is 

applied  by  numerous  social  institutions.  Mediation  helps  different  social  groups  better  understand  each 

other  (Wall  &  Dunn,  2012);  it  is  used  to  avoid  workplace  conflicts  (Bennet,  2012);  it  helps  achieve  higher 

efficiency of learning in all areas and levels of education (Coste, Cavalli, 2015). 

Cultural  and  behavioral  skills  are  essential  for  mediators,  in  that  it  is  necessary  to  have  general 

knowledge  of  a  culture,  to  know  the  rules  and  norms  of  social  interaction  in  a  certain  society,  to  be 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



774 

 

 

 



empathetic and to control one’s own psychological states. Therefore, we believe that mediation skills are part 

of the cross-cultural competence. 

Indeed,  the  success  of  mediation  in  a  foreign  language  depends  on  the  skills  mentioned  above  and 

language proficiency of the mediator. For instance, when retelling a written text in recipient’s language we 

not  only  transfer  information,  but  also  establish  a  kind  of  relationship.  It  happens  because  the 

communicating parties observe the reaction to received information and are able to tell when it is necessary 

to provide additional explanations, to shorten the text or to employ other narrative strategies. These abilities 

are  based  on  empathy  within  the  cultural  context  of  communicating  parties.  Some  studies  showed  that 

communicative  interaction  among  students  of  Russian  universities  is  highly  emotional,  communicatively 

democratic,  but  also  communicatively  dominant;  it  is  honest  and  very  broad  in  content;  it  prioritizes 

informal communication and is characterized by lower level of attention when listening (Sternin, 2012). Each 

of these cultural traits can result in both advantages and difficulties in communication, thus illustrating the 

point  that  the  successful  mediation  depends  upon  the  ability  of  communicating  parties  to  analyze  their 

situation and find the best ways of achieving their communicative aim.  

The  verbal  side  of  professional  communication  (Bodalyov,  1996)  includes:  (1)  the  substance  of 

communication,  that  is  correct  transfer  of  information  and  facts  within  the  scope  of  the  communicator’s 

specialization,  using  necessary  terms  and  language  functions  in  order  to  produce  a  coherent  and  logical 

statement;  (2)  a  personal  component  that  is  characterized  by  the  level  of  emotional  involvement  of  the 

communicant  and  their  ability  to  control  the  interaction  to  achieve  professional  aims;  (3)  socio-cultural 

competence which at the language level involves choosing the right style of communication and observing 

the necessary norms.  

All of these bear a direct relevance to the task of managing intellectual labor in professional groups. 

Here, two main forms of mediation, (1) cognitive and (2) relational are linked to, respectively: 

(1) the ability to present information in a plain manner using necessary verbal techniques; 

(2) the ability to interact with the audience in order to ensure that the mediated information has been 

received. 

The skills of a professional manager include communication in English in a multicultural environment 

and awareness of international aspects of managerial tasks. They involve the transfer of information between 

communicating  parties  in  a  multicultural  environment  using  mediation  skills  (Saint-Petersburg  State 

University Tertiary Education Standard. Baccalaureate. 2015, p. 5). 

 

Research Questions or Hypotheses 

The aforementioned reasons lead us to formulating the research question: if mediation is integrated 

into the discussion task, how can group discussions be effectively assessed? 

Our hypothesis is that assessing oral mediation of professional discussion is most effective when  

1)  the  controlled  objects  are  determined  by  the  aims  and  specific  characteristics  of  Content  and 

Language Integrated Learning; 

2) mediation skills are formed at the lessons based on the interactive method and group work aimed 

at practicing group discussions; 

3) test tasks are designed so that oral mediation is required to complete the task, the task employs a 

modeled situation and a variety of formal and informal styles; 

4) the set of test tasks is standardized and linked to CEFR; 

 

Method 



4.1. Objects of assessment 

Communicative  competence  as  defined  by  Hymes  (Hymes,  1972,  277)  embraces  the  intuitive 

functional knowledge and control of the principles of language usage

. It allows the language user 

to produce 

speech  according  to  the  aims  of  communication  in  certain  settings.  In  a  more  general  form,  it  can  be 

described as the ability to participate verbally in a communicative action (Zimnyaja, 1985). 

Communicative  competence  has  been  described  by  many  researchers  (Canale  and  Swain  (1980), 

Bachman  (1990),  Izarenkov  (1990),  Leontiev  (1991),  Passov  (1991),  Zimnyaja  (1991)  etc.).  It  is  viewed  as  a 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



775 

 

 

 



complex  entity,  consisting  of  the  following  more  specific  competences:  linguistic,  socio-linguistic,  socio-

cultural, discursive, strategic, subject-specific, professional, etc. However, the contents of each specific type 

of  communicative  competence  are  understood  differently  by  different  researchers.  For  instance,  Russian 

researchers  tend  to  associate  socio-cultural  competence  with  language  and  country  studies  competence, 

language and cultural competence and cross-cultural competence (Kapitonova, 2006; Moskovkin, p. 64-66). 

In this study we are going to use the ideas of D. I. Izarenkov, who proposes to solve this problem by defining 

basic components of communicative competence: language, subject-specific and pragmatic (Izarenkov, 1990, 

p.  56).  Language  competence  ensures  the  accuracy  of  speech;  subject-specific  competence  is related  to  the 

content,  i.  e.  the  knowledge  of  the  subject;  pragmatic  competence  allows  us  to  fulfill  communicative 

intentions  according  to  the  demands  of  the  communicative  situation  (Ibidum).  For  the  purposes  of  this 

study, the objects of oral mediation assessment are grouped in three blocks: language, subject-specific and 

pragmatic  components;  and  each  of  them  is  described  by  language  and  professional  competences  (see 

Table 1).  

 

 



 

 

 



 

Table 1. Objects of oral mediation assessment in CLIL classes for Management students. 

Components 

Language and professional oral competences in business discussions 

Language 

Pronunciation, accuracy and range of the lexical resource and grammar patterns 

within B2 (CEFR)   

Subject-


specific 

Subject-specific knowledge in the field of Management 

Pragmatic 

Cognitive mediation 

 

textual aspect:  



- introduction,  

-  determining  the  topic  and  the    problem  of 

discussion,  

-  discerning  the  major  aspects,  the  ability  to 

summarize, 

- rephrasing, 

- splitting complex elements of the text into 

parts, 


- enriching the text by providing explanations

- shortening the text; 

 

logical coherence:  



- arguing a point, showing causal links; 

 

functional aspect: 



-  generalizing  and  specifying,  providing  both 

general and specific examples, 

- comparing and contrasting 

- classifying 

- providing definitions of 

events/phenomena/objects. 

 

 

Relational mediation 



 

taking 


into 

account 


characteristics  of  the  audience 

and  the  situation:  the  ability  to 

change style and difficulty level 

of speech; 

 

supporting  interaction:  showing 



interest  in  the  opinion  of  the 

interlocutor, 

helping 

them 


develop  their  arguments  by 

asking  leading  questions  and 

providing constructive criticism, 

agreeing or disagreeing with the 

opinion  of  the  interlocutor, 

taking 


their 

opinion 


into 

account  when  developing  your 

own argument; 

 

managing group work: ensuring 



adherence  to  the  chosen  format 

of  interaction,  providing  an 

introduction  to  the  interaction, 

setting its aim and summarizing 

results, stimulating interaction

1   ...   136   137   138   139   140   141   142   143   ...   176


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling