International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology


Download 24.32 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet145/176
Sana05.12.2019
Hajmi24.32 Mb.
1   ...   141   142   143   144   145   146   147   148   ...   176

Daytime dysfunction 

Never (0 point) 

51 

25.5 


1-2 times a day (1 point) 

58 


29.0 

1-2 times a week (2 points) 

61 

30.5 


3 times a week and above (3 points) 

30 


15.0 

Sleep quality 

Global score < 5 

41 

20.5 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



804 

 

 

 



Global score  ≥ 5 

159 


79.5 

When Table 2 was analyzed, it could be seen that subjective sleep quality of the university students 

(evaluating  one’s  own  sleep  quality)  was  very  good  (n=24;  12%)  and  good  (n=91;  45.5%).  However,  32% 

(n=64)  of  the  students  stated  that  their  subjective  sleep  quality was poor  and  10.5% (n=21)  of  them  stated 

that  their  subjective  sleep  quality  was  very  bad.  A  significant  amount  of  the  students  fell  asleep  in  16-30 

minutes (n=79; 39.5%) and in 31-60 minutes (n=71; 35.5%). It could be revealed that there was a cluster in the 

students’ sleep durations between 5-7 hours. 44.5% (n=89) of the students slept for 6-6.9 hours; 16.5% (n=33) 

of them slept for 5-5.9 hours. A  

large  amount  of  the  students  had  high  habitual  sleep  efficiency  levels  (n=160;  80%).  The  students 

experienced sleep disturbances once a week (n=99; 49.5%) and twice a week (n=85; 42.5%). The number of 

students using sleep medications was quite low (n=6; 3.0%). The number of students experiencing daytime 

dysfunction  (daytime  sleepiness)  was  high.  29%  (n=58)  of  the  students  experienced  daytime  dysfunction 

once or twice a day, while 30.5% (n=61) of them experienced daytime dysfunction once or twice a week and 

15% (n=30) experienced daytime dysfunction three times a week and above. It was found that 79.5% (n=159) 

of the students who participated in the research had good sleep quality, while 20.5% (n=41) had poor sleep 

quality.  



 

Table 3. The comparison of the students’ sleep qualities according to gender 

Variables 

Gender  



Sd± 

S

error

 

T test 





Subjective sleep quality 

Female 


106 

1.43 


0.82 

0.08 


0.242 

0.809 


Male 

94 


1.40 

0.90 


0.09 

 

 



Sleep latency 

Female 


106 

0.97 


0.93 

0.09 


-1.221 

0.223 


Male 

94 


1.13 

0.94 


0.09 

 

 



Sleep duration 

Female 


106 

1.04 


8.17 

0.79 


0.915 

0.361 


Male 

94 


0.27 

0.55 


0.05 

 

 



Habitual sleep efficiency 

Female 


106 

1.59 


0.67 

0.06 


0.923 

0.357 


Male 

94 


1.51 

0.60 


0.06 

 

 



Sleep disturbance frequency 

Female 


106 

1.34 


0.81 

0.07 


1.069 

0.206 


Male 

94 


1.49 

0.85 


0.08 

 

 



Use of sleep medications 

Female 


106 

0.13 


0.55 

0.05 


-0.813 

0.417 


Male 

94 


0.20 

0.66 


0.06 

 

 



Daytime dysfunction 

Female 


106 

1.39 


0.97 

0.09 


0.540 

0.590 


Male 

94 


1.31 

1.07 


0.11 

 

 



Sleep quality 

Female 


106 

1.80 


0.40 

0.03 


0.255 

0.799 


Male 

94 


1.79 

0.41 


0.04 

 

 



When Table 3 was analyzed, it was found that there was not a significant difference between female 

and male students according to gender regarding sleep quality and the sub-dimensions of sleep quality,  

which were subjective sleep quality, sleep latency (the duration of falling asleep), habitual sleep efficiency, 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



805 

 

 

 



sleep disturbance frequency, use of sleep medications use and daytime dysfunction (p>0.05) 

Table 4. The comparison of the students’ physical activity levels according to gender 

Variables 

Gender 





Sd± 

S

error

 

T test 





MET level (ml/kg/min.) 

Female 


106 

2917.9 


3604.1 

350.0 


-2.075 

0.039* 


Male 

94 


3978.7 

3612.3 


372.5 

 

 



*Significant at 0.05 level 

When Table 4 was analyzed, it was found that there was a significant difference between female and 

male students on behalf of male students regarding physical activity level (p<0.05). 

Table 5. The relationship between the students’ physical activity levels and sleep qualities 

 

MET 



SSQ 

UL 


SD 

HSE 


SDF 

USM 


DD 

SQ 


MET 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

SSQ 


0.106 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



UL 

-0.285* 


0.157* 

 



 

 

 



 

 

SD 



0.296* 

0.256** 


0.083 

 



 

 

 



 

HSE 


0.259* 

-0.021 


-0.027 

-0.069 


 

 



 

 

SDF 



0.129 

0.240** 


0.222** 

0.139* 


-0.063 

 



 

 

USM 



-0.060 

0.104 


0.126 

0.041 


-0.010 

0.099 


 

 



DD 

0.059 


0.497** 

0.288** 


0.229** 

0.059 


0.355** 

0.230**  1 

 

SQ 


-0.272* 

0.644** 


0.532** 

0.524** 


-0.039 

0.505** 


0.334**  0.766  1 

*Significant  relationship  at  0.05  level;  **Significant  relationship  at  0.01  level;  MET:  Metabolic  Equivalent;  SUK: 

Subjective  sleep  quality;  SL:  Sleep  Latency;  SD:  Sleep  Duration;  HSE:  Habitual  Sleep  Efficiency;  SDF:  Sleep 

Disturbance Frequency; USM; Use of Sleep Medications; DD: Daytime Dysfunction; SQ: Sleep Quality 

When  Table  5  was analyzed,  it was found  that  there  was a  low level,  positive  relationship  between 

physical activity and sleep quality (r=0.272), sleep duration (r=0.296) and habitual sleep efficiency (r=0.259) 

in  the  university  students  (p<0.05).  It  was  also  revealed  that  there  was  a  low  level,  negative  relationship 

between physical activity and sleep latency (r=-0.285) in the students (p<0.05). 

 

5. Discussion and Conclusion 

Quality sleep is a prerequisite and complement of a quality life. Poor sleep quality is an indicator of 

mental  and  physical  diseases    [22].  Inadequate  sleep  causes  a  decrease  in  cognitive,  psychomotor  and 

emotional  functions  [7].  Sleep  quality  is  a  complex  phenomenon  and  is  a  combination  of  subjective  and 

objective factors affecting the sleep functions of the individual  [22]. 

Complaints  about  sleep  have  become  a  public  health  issue.  Sleep  quality  needs  to  be  measured 

because  of  the  fact  that  the  frequency  of  sleep-related  complaints  have  increased  and  that  sleep  affects 

physiological, psychological and social health  [23]. 

Sleep plays an important role in protecting the  health of young individuals. However, sleep-related 

complaints among young people are frequently encountered [7]. Physical activity and exercise can be used 

in eliminating the complaints of young people about sleep. For this reason, in this research, which evaluated 

the relationship between physical activity and sleep quality in the university students studying in different 

associate and undergraduate programs of the universities, it was determined that 79.5% of the students had 

good sleep quality (Table 2). Nonetheless, when the sub-dimensions of sleep quality were examined, various 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



806 

 

 

 



findings were obtained that might negatively affect health. The students’ duration of falling asleep usually 

varied  between  30-60  minutes.  A  significant  amount  of  the  students  fell  asleep  in  16-30  minutes  (n=79; 

39.5%) and in 31-60 minutes (n=71; 35.5%). Only 14.5% (n=29) of the students could sleep within the first 15 

minutes after they went to bed (Table 2). 

Sleep  requirement  varies  by  age.  In  adults,  this  duration  is  7-8  hours  on  average  [24].  However,  it 

could be revealed that there was a cluster in the students’ sleep durations between 5-7 hours. 44.5% (n=89) of 

the students slept for 6-6.9 hours; 16.5% (n=33) of them slept for 5-5.9 hours. (Table 2). 

Of  the  students  who  participated  in  the  research,  the  number  of  students  experiencing  daytime 

dysfunction  (daytime  sleepiness)  was  high.  29%  (n=58)  of  the  students  experienced  daytime  dysfunction 

once or twice a day, while 30.5% (n=61) of them experienced daytime dysfunction once or twice a week and 

15%  (n=30)  experienced  daytime  dysfunction  three  times  a  week  and  above  (Table  2).  The  fact  that  the 

students do not sleep until late at nights in dormitories, apart houses and student homes, that they study for 

their exams during the exam periods until late at nights and sometimes  until the mornings, and that they 

turn it into a habit may be the reason of experiencing daytime dysfunction. 

In  this  research,  it  was  found  that  there  was  not  a  significant  difference  between  female  and  male 

university students regarding sleep quality (Table 3). When the literature is examined, it is possible to find 

studies  that  support  this  finding.  Eliasson  and  Lettieri    [25];  Şenol  et  al.  [26];  Aysan  et  al.  [27]  stated  that 

gender did not affect sleep quality. However, Potter  and Perry   [24] revealed that women  had more sleep 

disturbances than men, while Liu et al. [9] reported that sleep quality of men was worse than that of women. 

In the research, it was found that there was a low level, positive relationship between physical activity 

and  sleep  quality,  sleep  duration  and  habitual  sleep  efficiency  in  the  university  students.  Besides,  it  was 

revealed that there  was a low level, negative relationship  between physical activity and  sleep latency (the 

duration  of falling asleep)  (p<0.05) (Table 5). Accordingly,  it can be  said that as the physical activity level 

increases,  the  duration  of  falling  asleep,  albeit  just  little,  decreases,  and  sleep  quality,  sleep  duration  and 

sleep efficiency increase. 

Physical  activity  levels  of  a  significant  amount  of  the  university  students  who  participated  in  the 

research were low (n=50; 25%) and moderate (n=108; 54%). 21% (n=42) of the students had a high level of 

physical activity (Table 1). It is thought that as the students’ physical activity levels increase, the low level of 

relationship between physical activity and sleep quality will increase. 

When  the  literature  is  examined,  it is possible  to  find  many  studies regarding  that  physical  activity 

and  exercise  increase  sleep  quality.  Işık  et  al.  [28]  reported  that  there  was  a  positive  relationship  between 

physical  activity  and  sleep  quality  in  the  university  students.  Benloucif  et  al.  [29]  stated  that  a  two-week 

morning exercise increased sleep quality. In similar studies, Adamson et al.  [30]; Montgomery and Dennis 

[31] reported that regular physical activity increased sleep quality in the adults. Loprinzi et al. [32] revealed 

that as a result of four months of exercise, the patients with chronic sleep disturbances experienced an 85-

minute increase in their sleep duration per night. Loprinzi and Cardinal  [33] found that sleep quality of the 

individuals between 18-85 years of age differed on the days when they did exercise and did not do exercise, 

and  that  on  the  days  of  exercise,  sleep  quality  of  the  individuals  was  high  and  their  daytime  sleep 

dysfunction was less common. In his study that compared the perceived and measured sleep qualities of 30 

elite rowers and 30 sedentary individuals, Ayar [22] concluded that the perceived and actual sleep qualities 

of elite rowers were higher than those of sedentary individuals. 

In accordance with the findings obtained from the research, it was concluded that physical activity in 

the  university  students  increased,  albeit  at  a  low  level,  sleep  quality.  Physical  activity  contributed  to  the 

reduction  of  sleep  latency  (the  duration  of  falling  asleep),  and  the  increase  in  sleep  duration  and  habitual 

sleep efficiency, though just little. As the frequency, intensity and duration of physical activity increase, the 

effect of physical activity on sleep quality is expected to increase, too. Therefore, university students should 

be  encouraged  to  participate  in  the  recreational  activities  and  exercise  programs  inside  and  outside  the 

campus. 


References 

1. Karadağ M. Uyku bozuklukları sınıflaması (ICSD-2). Türkiye Klinikleri Archives of Lung 2007; 8(3): 88-91.  



International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



807 

 

 

 



2.  Bingöl  N.  Hemşirelerin  uyku  kalitesi,  iş  doyumu  düzeyleri  ve  aralarındaki  ilişkinin  incelenmesi. 

Cumhuriyet Üniversitesi. Sağlık Bilimleri Enstitüsü. Yüksek Lisans Tezi. Sivas. 2006: 14-15. 

3.  Engin  E,  Özgür,  G.  Yoğun  bakım  hemşirelerinin  uyku  düzen  özelliklerinin  iş  doyumu  ile  ilişkisi.  Ege 

Üniversitesi Hemşirelik Yüksekokulu Dergisi 2004; 20 (2): 45-55. 

4. Kucharczyk E.R, Morgan K, Hall A.P. The occupational impact of sleep quality and insomnia symptoms. 

Sleep Medicine Reviews 2012; 16 (6): 547-559. 

5. Üstün Y, Çınar Yücel Ş. Hemşirelerin uyku kalitesinin incelenmesi. Maltepe Üniversitesi Hemşirelik Bilim 

ve Sanatı Dergisi 2011; 4 (1): 29-38. 

6. Keshavarz Akhlaghi A.A, Ghalebandi, M.F. Sleep quality and its correlation  with  general health in pre-

university students of Karaj. Iran. Iranian Journal of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences 2009; 3(1): 44-49. 

7.  Orzech  K.M,  Salafsky,  D.B,  Hamilton,  L.A.  The  state  of  sleep  among  college  students  at  a  large  public 

university. Journal of American College Health 2011; 59(7): 612-619. 

8.  Vail-Smith  K,  Felts  W.M,  Becker  C.  Relationship  between  sleep  quality  and  health  risk  behaviors  in 

undergraduate college students. College Student Journal 2009; 43(3): 924-930.  

9. Liu X, Zhao Z, Jia C, Buysse D.J. Sleep patterns and problems among Chinese adolescents. Pediatrics 2008; 

121(6): 1165-1173. 

10.  Kang  J.H,  Chen  S.C.  Effects  of  an  irregular  bedtime  schedule  on  sleep  quality  daytime  sleepiness  and 

fatigue among university students in Taiwan. BMC Public Health 2009; 9(1): 248. 

11.  Taylor  D.J,  Bramoweth  A.D.  Patterns  and  consequences  of  inadequate  sleep  in  college  students: 

Substance use and motor vehicle accidents. Journal of Adolescent Health 2010; 46(6): 610-612.  

12. Lund H.G, Reider B.D, Whiting A.B, Prichard J.R. Sleep patterns and predictors of disturbed sleep in a 

large population of college students. Journal of Adolescent Health 2010; 46(2): 124-132. 

13. Borodulin K, Evenson K.R, Monda K, Wen F, Herring A.H, Dole N. Physical activity and sleep among 

pregnant women. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology 2010; 24(1): 45-52. 

14. Uezu E, Taira K, Tanaka H, Arakawa M, Urasakii C, Toguchi H, et al. Survey of sleep‐health and lifestyle 

of the elderly in Okinawa. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences 2000; 54(3): 311-313. 

15. Vardar S.A. Egzersiz ve uyku ilişkisi tam olarak biliniyor mu? Genel Tıp Dergisi 2005; 15(4): 173-177. 

16.  Craig  C.L,  Marshall  A.L,  Sjorstrom  M.,  Bauman  A.E,  Booth  M.L,  Ainsworth  B.E,  et  al.  International 

physical  activity  questionnaire:  12-country  reliability  and  validity,  Medicine  and  Science  in  Sports  and 

Exercise 2003; 35 (8): 1381-1395. 

17.  Öztürk  M.  Üniversitede  eğitim-öğretim  gören  öğrencilerde  uluslararası  fiziksel  aktivite  anketinin 

geçerliliği  ve  güvenirliği  ve  fiziksel  aktivite  düzeylerinin  belirlenmesi.  Yüksek  Lisans  Tezi.  Hacettepe 

Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Enstitüsü. Ankara. 2005: 42-43. 

18. Karaca A, Turnagöl H.H. Çalışan bireylerde üç farklı fiziksel aktivite anketinin geçerliliği ve güvenilirliği. 

Spor Bilimleri Dergisi 2007; 18 (2): 68-84. 

19. Buysse D.J, Reynolds C.F, Monk T.H, Berman S.R, Kupfer D.J. The Pittsburgh sleep quality index: A new 

instrument for psychiatric practice and research. Psychiatry Research 1989; (28): 193-213. 

20.  Ağargün  M.Y,  Kara  H,  Anlar  O.  Pittsburgh  Uyku  Kalitesi  İndeksinin  geçerliği  ve  güvenirliği.  Türk 

Psikiyatri Dergisi 1996; 7: 107-115. 

21. Alpar R. Spor bilimlerinde uygulamalı istatistik. 3. baskı. Ankara: Nobel Yayınevi; 2010: 56-57. 

22.  Ayar  S.  Milli  kürekçiler  ile  sedanter  bireylerde  algılanan  ve  ölçülen  gerçek  uyku  kalitesinin 

karşılaştırılması. Düzce Üniversitesi. Sağlık Bilimleri Enstitüsü. Yüksek Lisans Tezi. Düzce. 2017: 76-77. 

23.  Hale  L,  Emanuele  E,  James  S.  Recent  updates  in  the  social  and  environmental  determinants  of  sleep 

health. Current Sleep Medicine Reports 2015; 1(4): 212-217. 

24.  Potter  P.A,  Perry  A.G,  Hall  A,  Stockert,  P.A.  Fundamentals  of  nursing St.  Louis,  Mo,  USA:  Mosby 

Elsevier. 2016. 

25.  Eliasson  A.H,  Lettieri  C.J,  Eliasson  A.H.  Early  to  bed,  early  to  rise!  Sleep  habits  and  academic 

performance in college students. Sleep and Breathing 2010; 14(1): 71-75. 

26. Şenol V, Soyuer F, Akça R.P, Argün M. Adolesanlarda uyku kalitesi ve etkileyen faktörler. Kocatepe Tıp 

Dergisi 2012; 13(2). 

27.  Aysan  E,  Karaköse  S,  Zaybak  A,  İsmailoğlu,  E.G.  Üniversite  öğrencilerinde  uyku  kalitesi  ve  etkileyen 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



808 

 

 

 



faktörler. Dokuz Eylül Üniversitesi Hemşirelik Fakültesi Elektronik Dergisi 2014; 7(3). 

28.  Işık  Ö,  Özarslan,  A,  Bekler  F.  Üniversite  öğrencilerinde  fiziksel  aktivite  uyku  kalitesi  ve  depresyon 

ilişkisi. Beden Egitimi ve Spor Bilimleri Dergisi 2015; 9: 65-73. 

29. Benloucif S, Orbeta L, Ortiz R, Janssen I, Finkel S.I, Bleiberg J, et al. Morning or evening activity improves 

neuropsychological performance and subjective sleep quality in older adults. Sleep 2004; 27(8): 1542-1551. 

30.  Adamson  B.C,  Yang  Y,  Motl  R.W.  Association  between  compliance  with  physical  activity  guidelines, 

sedentary behavior and depressive symptoms. Preventive Medicine 2016; 91: 152-157. 

31.  Montgomery  P,  Dennis  J.A.  Physical  exercise  for  sleep  problems  in  adults  aged  60+. The  Cochrane 

Library. 2002. 

32.  Loprinzi  P.D,  Cardinal  B.J.  Association  between  objectively-measured  physical  activity  and  sleep, 

NHANES 2005–2006. Mental Health and Physical Activity 2011; 4(2): 65-69. 

33. Loprinzi P.D, Finn K.E, Harrington S.A, Lee H, Beets M.W, Cardinal B.J. Association between physical 

activity behavior and sleep-related parameters of adolescents. Journal of Behavioral Health (2012); 1(4): 286-

293. 


 

 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



809 

 

 

 



A Brief Overview and Studies Analysis Focus on the Methods of 

Monitoring the Functional Status of Athletes Practicing Martial Arts 

 

Aleksander Osipov



1,2,5



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   141   142   143   144   145   146   147   148   ...   176


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling