International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology


Download 24.32 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet147/176
Sana05.12.2019
Hajmi24.32 Mb.
1   ...   143   144   145   146   147   148   149   150   ...   176
Participants and Setting 

Convenient  sampling  method  was  utilized  for  selecting  participants.  Totally  92  students  (34  female 

and  58  male)  accepted  to  participate  this  study  from  two  public  universities.  Data  collected  from  three 

groups of students; a) basketball group was 31 (M

age

= 21.49, SD=2.44) students, b) volleyball group was 28 



(M

age


= 20.11, SD= 1.88) students, and c) football group was 33 (M

age


= 20.85, SD= 1.04) students.  

Three group participants followed 14 weeks lesson content and completed writing and performance exams. 

Participants filled out CM before and after courses. They completed CM in regular class time. Duration for 

filling CM was 20 minutes.  



Data Collection  

Content Map Instrument 

Data were collected with content map (CM) which is a valid and reliable tool for measuring SCK [14]. 

CM is a graphic organizer of SCK and demonstrates instructional tasks of sport specific skills/techniques to 

be taught in school physical education setting for a particular lesson duration (i.e., 10 lessons). CM is a blank 

page  and  at  the  beginning,  participants  identify  basic  skills  that  would  be  taught  in  physical  education 

lessons  (e.g.,  smash,  drop).  They  write  them  horizontally  from  left  side  to  right  side.  Then,  they  write 

sequence  of  instructional  tasks for  each  skill/technique  from  down  to  up  (e.g.,  teaching  grip  or  backhand 

service  through  target).Later,  vertical  sequences  of  tasks  can  be  combined.  For  example,  long  service  and 

smash from back court can be used together and diagramed on CM. When all tasks, skills/techniques and 

combinations  were  written,  weak  or  strong  SCK  level  in  PETE  students  and  physical  education  teachers 

would  be  differentiated.  More  detailed  information  and  examples  could  be  seen  on 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iCE7CEa7KPU&t =2s.  



Content Development Categories 

Content  development  is  the  key  of  SCK  [14].  Rink  [15]  defined  content  development;  a)  Informing: 

initial  task  of  every  skills/techniques  or  lesson,  b)  Extending:  changing  complexity  of  tasks  through 

increasing or decreasing difficulty of them, c) Refining: it is about quality of performing, d) Applying: Game 

performance  or  assessment.  In  2017,  Ward  and  his  colleagues  modified  and  added  three  more  categories. 

Added  categories:  e)  Extending-applying:  extending  task  happened  within  games,  f)  Refining-applying: 

refining task during gaming. Rink [15] defined applying task in two parts which were game or assessment. 

In  modified  categories,  Ward  et  al.  [14]  defined  categories  as  informing  (I),  extending  (E),  refining  (R), 



International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



823 

 

 

 



extending-applying (EA), refining-applying (RA), applying game (AG), and applying non-game (AN). The 

depth of content development of participants is determined by content development on CM. 



Gauging Depth of Content Development 

A formula: 

𝐸 + 𝐸𝐴 + 𝑅 + 𝑅𝐴 + 𝐴𝐺 + 𝐴𝑁

𝐼

 



validated by Ward et al. [14] was used for evaluating content development. As seen above, SCK index 

is  calculated  that  total  number  of  informing  tasks  take  place  as  a  denominator  and  all  other  tasks  as 

numerators.  This  index  score  is  used  in  literature  for  determining  SCK  level  of  participants  [16,  17,  18]. 

Calculated index score is continuous variable and allows scores to be compared against each other.  

Cut point 3.0 was set as criteria for distinguishing strong and weak content development. Studies in 

literature  rationalized  this  index  score  via  empirical  validation  data  [15,  18,  19].  A  mean  score  of  3.0 

demonstrates that a physical education teacher or a PETE student used at least three other instructional tasks 

beyond  informing  task.  Using  all  tasks  except  informing  tasks  are  the  evidence  of  content  development 

progression. 

Coder Training and Inter-Observer Agreement 

A  four-phase  coding  training  guided  by  Content  Development  Coding  Assessment  Manual  [20] 

followed by three coders before data collection. In the initial phase, they learned and discussed all modified 

content development categories. Second, there were categories and definitions on the paper and they asked 

to match them. To be able to pass to the next phase, all categories and definitions must have been matched 

correctly. Then, prepared 35 examples from different sports were given coders and they continued coding 

them until they reached 100% matching success. In the final phase, coders took 45 instructional tasks from 

previously completed CMs and coded them. They passed this phase when they answered correctly at least 

95% of all instructional tasks. The four-phase training was strictly applied. When coders could not meet the 

criteria of any phase, they turned back to first phase and started again. 

To check inter-observer agreement, 33% of total number of content maps (CM) (N=31) were selected 

and coded. Mean inter observer agreement was calculated as 96.8 % (range 95.2- 97.6).  



Data Analysis 

SCK  index  scores  of  three  group  participants  were  reported  descriptively.  Then,  we  used  paired 

sample t-test to compare within results of three groups. Before conducting analysis, assumptions of paired 

sample  t-test  were  checked.  Skewness-Kurtosis,  histogram  and  p-p  plots  were  used  for  testing  normality 

assumption. Results showed that assumption was met. Second assumption was all dependent variables must 

be continuous. Variables were continuous and this assumption was met. Final assumption was observations 

must  be  independent.  Researchers  confirmed  this  assumption.  Overall,  assumptions  indicated  that  paired 

sample t-test could be used for analyzing collected data. 

Instructional  conditions  of  three  different  groups  were  represented  according  to  their  instructional 

foci. We investigated observation through 65% of basketball, 70% of volleyball and 65 % of football classes. 

In this process, we used three steps observation protocol. First, we collected contents being taught to what 

was indicated  in  syllabi  of  three  groups.  Analysis showed  that  lecturers  followed  their  contents  lesson  by 

lesson  as  expected.  Second,  organizations  which  were  defined  each  lesson  about  pedagogy  have  been 

examined.  Data  indicated  that  organization  and  syllabi  were  ensured  according  to  lessons  we  observed. 

Third, we did final judgment about correction of all lessons. 

Results 

Table 1. Table of paired sample t-test  

 

Paired Differences 



df 


Sig. (2-

tailed) 


SD 


SE Mean 

International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



824 

 

 

 



Pair 1  Football_pretest 

Football_posttest 



-.21 

.34 


.06 

-3.44 


32 

.00 


Pair 2  Basketball_pretest 

Basketball_posttest 



-.67 

.67 


.12 

-5.61 


30 

.00 


Pair 3  Voleyball_pretest- 

Voleyball_posttest 

-.46 

.52 


.10 

-4.63 


27 

.00 


 

Table  1  indicated  that  pre and  post  test  results  of  football  (t

(32)

=  -3.44,  p<.05),  basketball  (t



(30)

=  -5.61, 

p<.05) and volleyball (t

(27)


= -4.63, p<.05) were significantly increased.  

 

Table 2. Pre and post test descriptive results of three groups 

 





SD 

SE Mean 


Football_pretest 

33 


.06 

.25 


.04 

Football_posttest 

33 

.27 


.32 

.06 


Basketball_pretest 

31 


.08 

.21 


.04 

Basketball_posttest 

31 

.76 


.60 

.11 


Voleyball_pretest 

28 


.00 

.00 


.00 

Voleyball_posttest 

28 

.46 


.52 

.10 


Even  results  showed  that  paired  sample  t-test  was  statistically  significant,  mean  post  test  results  of 

football (M= .27, SD=.32), basketball (M= .76, SD=.60) and volleyball (M= .46, SD=.52) groups reached lower 

values than expected criteria (3.0) value (See table 3 and graphic 1). 

 

Graphic 1. Mean pretest and posttest SCK scores 

Discussion 

The  purpose  of  this  study  was  to  examine  PETE  students’  volleyball,  basketball  and  football  SCK 

levels. We hypothesized that PETE students will increase basketball, football and volleyball SCK levels after 

14 weeks courses. Paired sample t-test showed that PETE students’ volleyball, basketball and football SCK 

levels  significantly  increased  from  pre  to  post  test.  Ward  et  al.  [21]  investigated  SCK  level  differences 

between CCK focused group and SCK focused group. Similar to our study, CCK focused group significantly 

increased  their  SCK  levels.  Despite  the  statistically  significance,  increase  in  the  SCK  score  was  not 

0.00


0.50

1.00


1.50

2.00


2.50

3.00


3.50

4.00


Football

Basketball

Volleyball

SC



Sco

re

Pretest



Posttest

Criterion for deep SCK 



International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



825 

 

 

 



meaningful. Preservice physical education teachers did not reach the benchmark 3.0 which is the indicator of 

deep SCK [15, 18, 19] . 

Our second hypothesis was that PETE students’ basketball, football and volleyball SCK level will be 

sufficient  for  having  deep  content  knowledge.  In  our  study,  SCK  index  score  3.0  which  shows  depth  of 

content  development  was  set.  Results  showed  that  mean  index  scores  of  football  (M=  .27),  basketball 

(M= .76) and volleyball (M= .76) group participants were determined. All group participants could not reach 

expected  SCK  index  scores  even  they  newly  completed  their  lessons.  Similar  results  have  been  found  in 

literature  [21,  22].  The  study  of  Ward,  He,  Wang,  and  Li[22]  examined  football  SCK  levels  of  Chinese 

secondary  physical  education  teachers.  Their  SCK  levels  were  lower  than  expected.  In  another  study,  low 

SCK level was also determined [22]. Study showed that CCK focused group had lower SCK score than SCK 

focused  group  in  terms  of  content  development  3.0  criteria.  This criterion  for  having  deep  SCK  could  not 

meet in different sport and context. Findings of another study showed that PETE students did not improve 

their basketball and parkour SCK level [23]. 

Having  sufficient  SCK  level  increases  PCK  of  physical  education  teachers [11,  12].  If  PETE  students 

graduate from their department without sufficient SCK levels for specific physical activity and sports, it will 

not possible to expect they could teach them to students appropriately. Siedentop [24] stated that if physical 

education teachers don’t have enough CK, they will teach same tasks again and again.  

The findings of this study had some limitations. First, sample might be moderate for measuring SCK 

level of PETE students. Future studies should focus on larger sample size. Second, we examined basketball, 

volleyball and football SCK level. Different physical activity and sports should be investigated. 



Conclusion 

Results of this  study concluded that football, volleyball and basketball SCK levels of PETE students 

statistically increased after 14 week courses. However, they could not reach required SCK value of 3.0. This 

study showed that SCK should be taught explicitly. In addition, devoted time for SCK should be increased in 

PETE program.  

References 

1. Ellis, R. Quality assurance for university teaching: Issues and approaches. In Handbook of quality 

assurance for university teaching. Routledge, 2018; P. 21–36. 

2. Atkins M, Brown, G. Effective teaching in higher education. Routledge, 2002; p. 4–5. 

3. Marsh HW. SEEQ: a reliable, valid, and useful instrument for collecting students' evaluations of university 

teaching. British Journal of Educational Psychology. 1982;52:1, 77–95. 

4.  Shulman  LS.  Knowledge  and  teaching:  Foundations  of  the  new  reform.  Harvard  Educational 

Review.1987;57:1, 1–23.  

5. Shulman LS. Those who understand: Knowledge growth in teaching. Educational Researcher. 1986;15: 

4–14. 


6. Ward P. Content matters: Knowledge that alters teaching. In: Housner L, Metzler M., Schempp P, et al. 

(eds). Historic Traditions and Future Directions of Research on Teaching and Teacher Education in Physical 

Education. Morgantown WV: Fitness Information Technology, 2009; P. 345–356. 

7.  Ball  DL,  Thames  MH,  Phelps  G.  Content  knowledge  for  teaching:  What  makes  it  special?  Journal  of 

Teacher Education.2008; 59:5, 389–407. 

8.  Ince  ML,  Ward  P,  Devrilmez  E.  Common  content  knowledge  and  specialized  content  knowledge  on 

physical activity and sport courses in Turkish PETE programs. December, 2012. Oral Session Presented at12

th

 



International Sport Science Congress, Denizli, Turkey.  

9. Ward P, Ince ML, Iserbyt P, Kim I, Lee YS, Li W, Sutherland S. International physical education teacher 

education physical activity content knowledge study. Poster Session Presented atCongress of 2013 

American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, Charlotte,NC. 

10. Ward P, Li W, Kim I, Lee YS. Content knowledge courses in physical education programs in South Korea 

and Ohio. International Journal of Human Movement Science. 2012; 6:131–144. 

11. Ward P, Kim I, Ko B, Li W. Effects of improving teachers’ content knowledge on teaching and student 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



826 

 

 

 



learning  in  physical  education.  Research  Quarterly  for  Exerciseand  Sport.  2014;  86:  130–139. 

doi:10.1080/02701367.2014.987908 

12. Iserbyt P, Ward P, Li W. Effects of improved content knowledge on pedagogical content knowledge and 

student performance in physical education. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 2017; 22: 71–78. 

13.  Kim  I. The  effects  of  a  badminton  content  knowledge  workshop  on  middle  school  physical  education 

teachers'  pedagogical  content  knowledge  and  student  learning.  Doctoral  dissertation,  The  Ohio  State  

University, 2011. 

14. Ward P, Dervent F, Lee YS, Ko B, Kim I, Tao W. Using content maps to measure content development in 

physical education: Validation and application. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education.  2017; 36: 20–31. 

doi:10.1123/jtpe.2016-0059. 

15.  Rink  J.  Development  of  a  system  for  the  observation  of  content  development  in  physical  education 

(unpublished doctoral dissertation). The Ohio State University, 1979. 

16. He Y, Wang X, Gao Y, Ward P. Rasch assessment of a common content test for soccer. Research Quarterly 

for Exercise and Sport Supplement. 2017; 88:A166. 

17. Tsuda E, Devrilmez E, Dervent F, Ward P. Differences in content knowledge between those who learned 

performing and teaching. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport Supplement. 2017; 88: A4 

18. Dervent F, Ward P, Devrilmez E, Tsuda E. Transfer of content development across practica in physical 

education teacher education. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education. 2018; 37:4, 330–339. 

19. Rink J. Task presentation in pedagogy. Quest. 1994; 46: 270–280. doi:10.1080/00336297.1994.10484126. 

20. Dervent F, Tsuda E, Devrilmez E, Ward P. Content development coding assessment manual. Version 2.1. 

2016; Retrieved from https://u.osu.edu/ltpe/. 

21. Ward P, Tsuda E, Dervent F, Devrilmez E. Differences in the content knowledge of those taught to teach 

and those taught to play. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education. 2018; 37:1, 59–68. 

22.  Ward  P,  He  Y,  Wang  X,  Li  W.  Chinese  secondary  physical  education  teachers’  depth  of  specialized 

content 

knowledge in soccer. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education. 2018; 37:1, 101–112. 

23.  Iserbyt  P,  Coolkens  R.  Content  development  as a  function  of  content  knowledge  courses  in  preservice 

physical education teachers. Journal of Physical Education and Sport. 2018; 18:4, 2440–2446. 

24. Siedentop D. Content knowledge for physical education. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education. 2002; 

21:4, 368–377. 

 

 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



827 

 

 

 



Job Satisfaction and Professional Burnout of High School Teachers 

Elena Kamneva

1*



Marina Polevaya

2



Anna Popova

3



Margarita Simonova

4

and 

Grigory 

Butyrin

5

 

1 Assistant professor, Finance University under the Government of the Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia. 

2 Professor and HOD, Finance University under the Government of the Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia. 

3 Assistant professor, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia. 

4 Assistant professor, Finance University under the Government of the Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia. 

5 Professor, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia. 

*corresponding author 

Abstract 

The  essence  of  occupational  burnout  phenomenon  reveals  within  the  employment  behavior 

management  as  the  display  of  professional  activity  effect  on  corporate  staff.  The  goal  of  our  study  is  to 

identify the relationship between occupational burnout components, ability to cope with stress and job and 

life satisfaction of university teachers. The study involved 100 teachers of the Finance University. The study 

results  suggest  that  the  stronger  the  emotional  thriftiness  mechanism,  the  more  callousness,  cynicism  or 

rudeness in dealing with colleagues and students, the less teachers are satisfied with their own work. The 

main  directions  of  educational  personnel  occupational  burnout  correction  control  for  the  purpose  of 

reduction and compensation, and for the purpose of personal occupational burnout prevention implemented 

in the course of the training workshop authorial program were emphasized. Within the corrective measures, 

conditions for the following personality development were provided: awareness of own ideas about stress, 

attitude to stress factors, awareness and management of own emotional states, ability to find resources for 

stress coping. 

Keywords:  occupational  burnout,  job  satisfaction,  ability  to  cope  with  stress,  employment  behavior  of 

teachers. 



1.  Introduction 

The  reorganization  of  higher  education,  transformation  of  universities  into  research  centers 

dramatically  increases  the  amount  of  scientific  load  on  teachers  while  increasing  the  amount  of  academic 

load,  the  need  for  the  use  of  innovative  and  digital  learning  technologies  in  teaching,  which  leads  to 

additional  strain  in  the  work  thus  boosting  the  occupational  burnout  and  undermining  the  employment 

behavior of teaching staff [1]. So, despite the fact that a significant amount of research papers is devoted to 

the  occupational  burnout  [2;  3; 4;  5; 6;  7],  at  the  present  time,  this  problem  has  again  become  relevant  for 

many types of professional activities, including university teachers. 

Despite  the  fact  that  the  problem  of  "occupational  burnout"  has  now  become  the  focus  of  much 

attention  in  the  labor  economics,  management,  labor  psychology,  managerial  psychology,  up  to  now,  the 

research literature gives no fairly clear definition of characteristic aspects of various deviations in the work 

of professionals both in general and in terms of professional personality development, though, at the same 

time,  there  are  many  close  concepts  that  address  deviations  in  the  professional  development  of  an 

individual,  for  instance,  "destructive  organizational  behavior",  "professional  degradations",  "learned 

helplessness",  "proneness  to  conflict",  "professional  activity  barriers",  "stressogenity  of  a  professional", 

"emotional burnout", "professional accentuations", "employment behavioral problems", etc. [4; 8; 9].  

The goal of our study is to identify the relationship between occupational burnout components, ability 

to cope with stress and job and life satisfaction of teachers. 





Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   143   144   145   146   147   148   149   150   ...   176


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling