International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology


Download 24.32 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet152/176
Sana05.12.2019
Hajmi24.32 Mb.
1   ...   148   149   150   151   152   153   154   155   ...   176

 

References 

1. Valliant, M., Emplaincourt, H., Wenzel, R. Nutrition education by a registered dietitian improves dietary 

intake and nutrition knowledge of a NCAA female volleyball team. Nutrients, 2012; 4, 506–516. 

2. Ureña, A., Calvo, R., Lozan, C. A study of serve reception in the top level of Spanish male volleyball after 

the introduction of the libero player. International Journal of Medicine and Science of Physical Activity and 

Sport, 2002; 2, 39-49. 

3. Miskin, M., Fellingham, G., Florence, L. Skill Importance in Women's Volleyball. Journal of Quantitative 

Analysis in Sports, 2010; 6(2), 1-14. 

4. Patsiaouras, A., Moustakidis, A., Charitonidis, K., Kokaridas, D. Volleyball technical skills a winning and 

qualification factors during the Olympic Games2008. International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport, 

2010; 10 (2), 115-120. 

5. Gubellini, L., Lobietti, R., Di Michele, R. Statistics in volleyball: the Italian professionals’ leagues. Scientific 

Fundaments of Human Movement and Sports Practice, 2005; 21(2), 323-334. 

6. Harriss D. J., Atkinson G. Ethical standards in sport and exercise science research: 2014 update. Int J Sports 

Med; 2013; 34: 1025-1028. 

7. Szabo D. A., Sopa I., S. Study on the Interpretation of the Results in a Volleyball Game by Using a Specific 

Program of Statistics, Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 2015; Vol 180, 1357–1363. 

8.  Szabo,  D.  A.  Modalities  of  using  the  information  provided  by  the  statistical  program  Click&Scout  for 

improving the outside hitters service efficiency in volleyball game, The European Proceedings Of Social & 

Behavioural Sciences EPSBS, 2016; no 47: 341-347. 

9.  Tillman,  M.  D.,  Hass,  C.,  Brunt,  D.,  Bennett,  G.  Jumping  and  landing  techniques  in  elite  women’s 

volleyball, Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 2004; 3, 30-36. 

10.  Marques,  M.  C.  Physical  fitness  qualities  of  professional  volleyball  players:  determination  of  position 

differences. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 2009; (23), p. 1106–1111.  

11.  Gamble,  P.  Strength  and  conditioning  for  team  sports:  sport-specific  physical  preparation  for  high 

performance. London, Great Britain: Routledge, 2nd Ed. 2010. 

12. Zhang, R. How to profit by the new rules. The Coach, 2000; 1, 9-11. 

13. Molina, J.J., Santos, J.A., Barriopedro, M.J., & Delgado, M.A. Match analysis from the competitive model: 

an applied example to serve in volleyball. Kronos, 2004; 5: 37-45. 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



859 

 

 

 



14. Palao, J. M., Santos, J. A., Ureña, A. Effect of team level on skill performance in volleyball. Int J Perform 

Anal Sport, 2004; 4 (2): 50-60. 

15. Palao, J. M., Santos, J. A., Ureña, A. Effect of service type and efficacy on block and defense performance 

in volleyball. RendimientoDeportivo.com, 2004; 8: 1-24. 

16.  Palao,  J.  M.  Effect  of  game  phases  and  setter  position  on  volleyball  performance  in  competition. 

RendimientoDeportivo.com, 2004; 9: 42-52. 

17. Palao, J. M., Santos, J. A., Ureña, A. Effect of service type and efficacy on block and defense performance 

in volleyball. RendimientoDeportivo.com, 2004; 8: 1-24. 

18. Palao, J. M., Santos, J. A., Ureña, A. Effect of team level on skill performance in volleyball. Int J Perform 

Anal Sport, 2004; 4 (2): 50-60. 

19.  FIVB.  Official  Volleyball  Rules  2013-2016.  Published  by  International  Volleyball  Federation  in 

www.fivb.org. 2012. 

20. Heyward, V. H. Advanced fitness assessment and exercise prescription. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 

2006. 


21. Coleman, S. A 3D kinematic analysis of the volleyball jump serve, 2005. 

22. Huang, C. F., Liu, G. C., Sheu, T. Kinematic analysis of volleyball jump topspin and float serve. XXV ISBS 

Symposium, 2007; p. 333-336. 

23. Moras, G., Buscà, B., Peña, J., Rodríguez, S., Vallejo, L., Tous-Fajardo, J., Mujika, I. (2008). A comparative 

study between server mode and speed and its effectiveness in a high-level volleyball tournament. Journal of 

Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 2008; 48 (1): 31-36. 

24.  Palao  J.,  Leite,  N.,  Mesquita,  I.,  Sampaio,  J.  Sex  difference  in  discriminative  power  of  volleyball  game-

related statistics, Perceptual and Motor Skills, 2010; 11(3), 893-900. 

25. Garganta, J. Trends of tactical performance analysis in team sports: Bridging the gap between research, 

training, and competition. Portuguese Journal of Sports Sciences, 2009; 9 (1), 81-89. 

 

 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



860 

 

 

 



Galectin -3 and Aldosterone Responses to An Altitude Cross-Country 

Skiing in Elite Endurance Skiers 

 

Zeynab K Ganjifar 



1*

and 

 

Farhad Rahmaninia 



2

  

1 Department of Exercise Physiology, University Campus2, University of Guilan, Rasht, Iran. 

2 Department of Exercise Physiology, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Guilan, Rasht, 

Iran. 

*corresponding author 

Abstract 

Introduction: In endurance athletes, the tissue muscle fibrosis in the heart muscle and reduction in its 

function  are  more  possible  due  to  excessive  physiological  pressure.  Galectin  is  a  reflection  of  the  possible 

fibrosis  caused  by  excessive  pressure  on  the  myocardium  structure.  In  the  present  study,  galectin-3  and 

aldosterone levels in elite endurance skiers were evaluated. 

Methodology: Fourteen elite endurance skiers (mean  age: 25 years; mean body fat: 14%) were selected for 

this study. Cross-country skiing activity was performed at the Dizin Ski School at an average altitude of 3140 

meters. The cross-country skiing program included a skiing route for 8.5 km, a mean time of 65 minutes, and 

mean intensity of 70-90% of the maximal oxygen consumption. Two weeks after the skiing, the running on 

the  treadmill  with  slope  and  distance  and  time  spent  similar  to  ski  resort  was  performed.  Galectin-3  and 

aldosterone  were  evaluated  by  ELISA  method.  Dependent  t-test  and  independent  t-test  were  used  for 

examining the inter-group and intra-group changes by using SPSS 25 software. 

Results: The results showed that galectin- 3 (p = 0.004) and aldosterone (p = 0.009) levels were significantly 

higher after endurance skiing than those in treadmill running. 

Conclusion: Increasing physiological pressure on the heart caused by exposure to hypoxia and dehydration 

may lead to changes in the levels of aldosterone and galectin-3 as a fibrotic cellular marker. 



Keywords: cross-country skiing, hypoxia, myocardium inflammation, dehydration, aldosterone. 

Introduction  

Galectin-3 has recently been recognized as a new marker for heart failure and one of the main causes 

of mortality in many populations. In addition, galectin-3 plasma level in humans is an independent predictor 

for the diagnosis of chronic and acute heart failure. Galectins are family of proteins, which 15 of them have 

been  identified  so  far  (6,16).  Galectin-3  is  a  protein,  which  includes  a  binding  area  for  identifying  the 

carbohydrates with 130 amino acids (12). An increase in Galectin-3 level is associated with the risk of death 

due to acute and chronic heart disease (13). Thus, an increase in galectin-3 level in patients with heart failure 

has particular importance. In addition, it has been proven that an increase in the level of galectin is involved 

in cancer, inflammation and tissue damage (1,14).  

Galectin-3,  as  a  beta-galactose  binding  galectin,  plays  a  key  role  in  increasing  cardiac  fibrosis  by 

activating  macrophages and  fibrocytes.  This  protein  is one  of  the  15  diagnostic  elements of  the  secondary 

family of lectins, which have one common characteristic. All of them have at least one branch, which is able 

to diagnose and bind to carbohydrate. More importantly, galectin-3, along with the secretory hormone of the 

right atrium, namely neuropeptide peptide, acts as a chronic and acute inflammatory regulator not only in 

the  myocardium,  but  also  in  many  cells  and  tissues,  through  applying  its  effects  on  intracellular  and 

extracellular  signaling  of  macrophages  and  neutrophils  (5,22,19).    Although  regular  training  activities  at 

moderate  intensity  are  beneficial  for  health,  new  studies  report  that  morphological  and  heart  function 

changes caused by high- intense training are the cause of increase in cardiovascular diseases (7), especially in 

trainings  in  which  physiological  stress  is  high,  such  as skiing  at  altitude,  which  its results  are  affected  by 

cold,  atmospheric  pressure,  altitude,  dehydration,  and  terrain  accidents  and  ups  and  downs,  leading  to 

imbalance in intensity of activity. In fact, endurance training is one of the effective ways to prevent and treat 

heart  failure.  However,  experimental  studies  suggest  that  excessive  and  high-intense  trainings  may  have 

acute  and  chronic  effects  on  the  heart,  especially  fibrotic  changes  in  myocardium  tissue,  resulting  in 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



861 

 

 

 



degradation  and  gradual  loss  of  myocardium  function.  In  addition,  high-intensity  endurance  training  is 

associated with biochemical disorders, which may reflect negative consequences on the heart structure and 

its biology (10,9). Accordingly, it seems that galectin as a biochemical marker can be potentially considered 

as a reflection of possible fibrosis formed by excessive pressure on the myocardium structure. It can be an 

indicator of the accumulation of fibrotic syndrome in endurance athletes. 

On the one hand, as high levels of galectin-3 plasma are a risk predictor in the general population and 

for patients with heart failure, the low levels of this biomarker are expected in the athletes. While protective 

effects  of  endurance  trainings  on  the  cardiovascular  system  have  been  recognized,  levels  of  this  variable 

increase  after  endurance  trainings.  Some  studies  suggest  that  galectin,  as  a  standard  biochemical  marker, 

more likely represents a part of the physiological responses to endurance trainings, rather than a parameter 

indicating a heart attack in healthy athletes. Athletes can freely select their speed. As intensity of endurance 

training  is  one  of  the  most  important  factors  affecting  the  increase  in  concentration  of  this  marker,  it  can 

affect  the  relationship.  Galectin  3  is  a  unique  protein  belonging  to  big  family  of  galectins.    This  protein 

contains  a  collagen-like  branch  and  carbohydrate  recognition,  binding  to  a  large  number  of  extracellular 

matrix  proteins,  carbohydrates,  and  cell  surface  receptors  (such  as  laminin,  fibronectin,  and  tenascin). 

Galectin-3 expression has been identified in several tissues (17, 11).  

However, its synthesis in cases of heart failure is considerable. Interestingly, Galectin-3 is not only a 

reliable marker indicating heart dysfunction and its complications, but also involved directly in diagnosing 

the  progression  and  exacerbation  of  heart  failure.  As  a  result,  it  leads  to  proliferation  of  myofibroblasts, 

collagen sedimentation, and lateral reconstruction of the heart muscle. In addition, there is evidence suggests 

that  galectin-3  inhibition  effectively  prevents  inflammation,  fibrosis,  hypertrophy  and  heart  dysfunction, 

which are common in endurance trainings athletes (2,3). Limited studies have been conducted on galectine-

3.  For  example,  Hatash  et  al.  (2013)  reported  an  increase  in  galectin  -3  levels  after  30  km  of  running  (12). 

Salovagno et al. (2014) reported an increase in this protein level after 60-km super marathon running (21). In 

another  study  conducted  on  22  non-elite  and  elite  but  non-active  male  endurance  runners,  the  results 

revealed  that  30  minutes  of  running  would  increase  galectin-3  plasma  levels  significantly  in  athletes 

compared to non-athlete control group. In this research, which was the first study evaluated the galectin-3 

plasma levels after endurance training; they found that an increase in galectin-3 levels was associated with 

the history of running, so that the level of increase was low in more experienced runners (22). 

The base plasma level of galectin-3 in healthy athletes is higher than that of non-athletic control group. 

Galectin  plasma  level  increased  after  training  in  endurance  athletes.  Experienced  runners  showed  lower 

increase in galectin- 3 level, reflecting an adaptation to long-term endurance training. In fact, galectin-3 plays 

a  significant  and  direct  role  in  two  main  pathophysiologic  mechanisms  (fibrosis  and  undesirable  heart 

reconstruction),  involved  in  development  of  heart  failure  (6,4).  It  seems  that  high-intensity  endurance 

trainings  with  biochemical  disorders  may  leave  side  effects  in  heart  structure  and  its  biology.  This 

hypothesis  has  also  recently  been  proposed  by  Wilson  et  al.  They  reported  that  long-term  high-intense 

aerobic trainings were associated with adverse adaptive changes in the structure and the electrical activity 

and function of heart (8). In addition, endurance skiers lose much of their water due to long-term activities, 

leading to dehydration in their bodies. It also leads to increased concentrations and osmolality of the blood 

(15). 


Athletes  are  always  experiencing  a  chronic  hypoxia  due  to  performing  hard  and  high-intense 

trainings, performed mainly at high altitude, in which partial oxygen pressure is lower than the sea level. 

Some  permanent  changes  are  created  in  structure  and  size  of  the  heart  muscle  of  their  vessels,  increasing 

their ability to effects of this hypoxia. However, it may be associated with sudden death in these athletes due 

to  reduced  ventricular  cavity  space  as  well  as  greater  cardiac  muscle  activity  to  cope  with  high  blood 

pressure (17,8). Thus, the evaluation of indicators that are pathologically predicting the potential disability of 

the  myocardium  in  the  extreme  conditions  of  cross-country  skiing  activity  is  crucial.  Moreover,  as  high-

intense aerobic trainings represent a unique and ideal model for the re-development of physiological heart 

stress  and  kinetics  study  of  heart  biological  markers,  the  current  research  evaluates  the  level  of  galectin-3 

and aldosterone in endurance elite athletes in two real skiing conditions and running on treadmill. 



International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



862 

 

 

 



Methodology  

After  coordinating  with  the  Islamic  Republic  of  Iran  Ski  Federation,  the  Center  for  Assessing  the 

National  Olympic  Academy  and  Dizin  Ski  Resort  Management,  and  obtaining  the  required  licenses,  the 

research was coordinated with elite skiers for assessing their condition including the level of their readiness 

and  current  trainings,  taking  their  consent,  and  explaining  various  dimensions  of  the  study.  Adequate 

information was provided on the process of conducting the research for the subjects. After determining the 

inclusion criteria, out of 19 athletes, 14 athletes with mean age of 25 years and body fat of 14% were selected 

as subjects. The health status was measured by a medical-sports questionnaire and people who had a history 

of cardiovascular, respiratory, metabolic and muscular disorders as well as severe physical injuries, such as 

fractures which might affect the outcome of research were excluded. 



Measurement 

Body composition was measured by bioelectric resistance method and by body composition analysis 

device (Inbody 3.3 model manufactured by Olympia Corporation of South Korea).  

The maximal  oxygen consumed by  the  subjects  was measured  by  Bruce's protocol [15]  and  by  respiratory 

gas analysis device (manufactured by Technogym Company, Germany). In order to eliminate the effects of 

high-intense activity on blood variables and performance, the maximal oxygen consumed was measured one 

week before start of the training program [119].  

Blood pressure was measured by the digital brachial sphygmomanometer (M40 Beaver manufactured 

by Germany) in four steps before and after the tests. 

Resting  heart  rate  was  also  measured  in  the  supine  state  after  15  minutes  of  complete  rest  for  15 

seconds. 

Heart rate during and after training, similar to the resting time, was measured by the  sphygmomanometer 

(PM80 Beaver manufactured by Germany). 

The  percentage  of  oxygen  saturation  was  measured  by  digital  Oximetry  Pulse  (I  HEALTH  PO3 

manufactured by Finland) in 4 steps before and after the tests. 

Laboratory assay  

To measure the blood variables of subjects, after a minimum of 12 hours of fasting, 10 ml of blood was 

taken from brachial vein of each person and blood samples were immediately poured into EDTA-containing 

tubes. Samples were centrifuged at 4 ° C with 1000 rpm for 20 minutes. Then, the plasma and serum were 

poured  into  the  encoded  tubes  separately.  To  minimize  the  effects  of  previous  training  on  the  research 

results, the subjects did not perform any training for 48 hours before the main test.  

Ski activity was performed between 9 am and 13 pm. Blood sampling was performed before and after 

it. After packaging the blood samples in bag of ice, it was transferred by technician to the Noor laboratory 

located  at  Tehran  Keshavar  Blvd  in  order  to  do  hematological  tests.  Some  amounts  of  the  serum  were 

transferred  to  the  Noor  laboratory  in  central  Tehran  to  measure  hematological  variables  including  CBC, 

sodium, potassium, creatinine and albumin. To measure the variables, they were kept at freezer at  -70 ° C. 

Galectin-3 concentrations were measured using a special human kit (D systems, Zellbio, Germany  R & D) 

and ELISA method. 

Blood aldosterone values were measured by ELISA method and Human insulin-specific 

radioimmunoassay (RIA) kit. The sensitivity of the measurement method was 0.15 μg/l. For higher accuracy, 

measurements were performed in two steps. 



Ski protocol 

The  cross-country  skiing  protocol  was  performed  at  the  Dizin  Ski  School  at  altitude  of  2720  meters 

from the sea level, temperature of -2 C and a humidity of 65%. After 12 minutes of warm-up, the subjects 

travelled the 8.5-km ski route from the ski school to Dizin Hill at altitude of 3620 meters, while they were 

equipped with pulsation monitoring device, with a mean time of 65 minutes and an intensity equal to 70 to 

90 of maximal oxygen consumed by skiers (Ski time with a FORTEX chronometer with an accuracy of 0.01 

seconds,  manufactured  by  Germany,  and  heart  rate  was  recorded  using  the  sphygmomanometer  device, 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



863 

 

 

 



German Beaver). The slope of the ski route varied and it reached up to 30% (positive or negative) in some 

places. The mean ski slope in the route from the starting point to the end point is 17+ percent. Immediately 

after the end of the ski by athletes, the final heart rate and oxygen saturation were recorded, and their blood 

pressure  was  measured.  Then,  with  interval  of  2  minutes  and  in  sitting  position,  blood  sampling  was 

performed from the anterior vein of the forearm.  Two weeks after skiing, the running on the treadmill test 

was performed  at  the  National  Olympic  Academy (NOA)  at  9:00  am. Similar  to  the  skiing  day,  the  initial 

evaluations  including  blood  pressure,  heart  rate  and  oxygen  saturation  measurements  were  performed. 

Then, initial blood sampling was performed by a laboratory technician. Then, subjects performed a protocol 

designed  for  phasing  of  slope,  time  and  distance  traveled  similar  to  the  ski  resort.  The  running  on  the 

treadmill  time  for  every  person  was  same  with  skiing  time.  For  this  purpose,  the  8.5-km  ski  route  was 

divided  into  9  stages  of  1000  meters  and  the  number  of  routes  with  positive  and  negative  slopes  was 

calculated, and based on it, the running on treadmill protocol was defined (Dizin Ski Resort has a map in 

which the distance, distance phasing, slope of each uphill and downhill, mean slope per thousand meters, 

mean of total slope and difference of the first slope and end slope have been defined). When running on a 

treadmill, activity intensity was calculated by measuring the heart rate and Burg's  scale. Immediately after 

running on a treadmill, and similar to skiing activity, the final heart rate and oxygen saturation level were 

recorded  and  their  blood  pressure  was  measured.  Then,  within  2  minutes  and  in  sitting  position,  blood 

samples were taken from the anterior vein of the forearm. 





Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   148   149   150   151   152   153   154   155   ...   176


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling