International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology


Download 24.32 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet160/176
Sana05.12.2019
Hajmi24.32 Mb.
1   ...   156   157   158   159   160   161   162   163   ...   176

2. Method 

Before we started the research, we obtained the approval from Directorate of Social Activity and 

Solidarity, and from the samples, because we are a certified research team, we belong to Laboratory of 

Physical activity of the child and adolescent, Oran, Algeria. 



2.1. Participants 

The research sample consisted of 25 blind students aged between 15 and 18; the arithmetic average of 

their ages was 16.38±0.72 (table 01) These students were randomly selected, and 10 students participated in 

the exploratory study. 



Table 1. Demographics of the study participants. 

sample 


Age 


Height 

Weight 


Mean±SD 

Mean±SD 


Mean±SD 

Blind 


25 

16.38±0.72 

171.47±3.28 

84.35±2.07 



2.2. Materials 

The experimental work was distributed over two days. On the first day, the weights and heights of the 

students were measured; the thickness of the skin folds was measured as well in three different areas of the 

body, i.e. chest, abdomen and mid-thigh. On the second day, the one-mile running test [43–37]. The visually 

impaired student was assisted by a member of the research team, with a 50 cm rope between them. 

The scientific foundations of the tests: 

The results obtained are summarized in Table 02; they indicate that the tests show high stability and 

reliability. The coefficients of stability range from 0.86 to 0.99 and are considered as high. The same applies 

for the reliability coefficients which are in the interval from 0.92 to 0.99; they are considered as very high. 

Table 2. Coefficient of stability and accuracy of the tests. 

Tests 


Stability coefficient 

Accuracy coefficient 

VO

2

 max 



0.86 

0.92 


Body fat percentage 

0.99 


0.99 

4. Results 

The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 22 was used to carry out a statistical analysis 

of the results  obtained. Prior to applying the  paired sample t-test, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test had been 

used to calculate the normal distribution of the data.  



4.1. Test of normality: 

Table 03 shows that the P-value for VO

max was 0.071 which is greater than 0.05, this means that data 



International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



910 

 

 

 



are distributed naturally. The P-value for body fat percentage was 0.001 which They are smaller than 0.05, 

This means that the body fat percentage does not follow normal distribution. 

After that, the paired sample t-test was applied to VO

2

 max and for the measurement of the body fat 



percentage to which the wilcoxen test was applied. 

Table 3.  The results of the normal distribution of data. 

tests 


Test of Kolmogorov-Smirnov 

number 


sig 

VO

2



 max 

25 


0.071 

Body fat percentage 

25 

0.001 


α=0.05. 

4.2. Research results: 

From  the  results  given  in  Table  04,  we  can  note  that  the  arithmetic  mean±standard  deviation  of 

VO

2

max in the pretest was 36.28±1.92. However, in the posttest, it was 41.37±1.54. The value of t was found 



equal to 9.11 and the probability value (P-value) was equal to 0.000, which is smaller than 0.01. Therefore, 

the  null  hypothesis  is  rejected  and  the  alternative  hypothesis  is  accepted,  which  indicates  that  there  are 

statistically significant differences between the pretest scores and post-test scores, with a tendency towards 

the post-test scores of the maximum oxygen consumption. 

Table  05  points  out  that  the  arithmetic  mean±standard  deviation  in  the  pretest  of  the  body  fat 

percentage was 23.68±2.06, and in the post-test it was 20.87±1.82, the value of Z was 2.66 with a probability 

value  of  0.008,  which  is  less  than  0.01.    Therefore,  the  null  hypothesis  is  rejected  but  the  alternative 

hypothesis is accepted; there are statistically significant differences between the pre-test scores and post-test 

scores with a tendency towards the post-test scores of the body fat percentage. 

Table 4. Statistical results cardio respiratory fitness. 

Tests 



df 

Mean±SD 



Sig 

VO



max 

pre-test 

25 

24 


36.28±1.92 

9.11 


0.000 

post-test 

25 

24 


41.37±1.54 

α=0.01. 

Table 5. Statistical results (Wilcoxen test) of body fat percentage for blind student. 

Test 



df 

Mean±SD 



Sig 

Body fat 

percentage 

pre-test 

25 

24 


23.68±2.06 

2.66 


0.008 

post-test 

25 

24 


20.87±1.82 

α=0.01. 

4.3. Effect size: 

From the results given in Table 06, we can note that η2 estimated 0.546, and the effect size estimated 

2.19, this means that the effect size of physical fitness program is very big on the VO

2

 max. 



Table  07  shows  that  the  r  of  body  fat  percentage  estimated  0.88,  this  mean  that  the  effect  size  of 

physical fitness program is very big on the body fat percentage. 



Table 6.  Results of effect size of cardio respiratory fitness. 

International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



911 

 

 

 



Test 

η

2

 



Effect size 

VO



max 

0.546 

2.19 

very big 



Table 7.  Results of effect size of body fat percentage. 

Test 



Effect size 

Body fat percentage 

0.88 


very big 

 

5. Discussion and Conclusion 

 The  results  obtained  in  this  study  show  that  blind  people  have  improved  their  post-test  fitness 

cardiorespiratory  level.  This  improvement  is  attributed  to  their  increased  physical  activity,  because  these 

people have been suffering from the lack of sufficient daily physical exercise due to their handicap, which 

imposed a certain lifestyle on them. Furthermore, the study found that visually impaired people have a low 

daily physical activity level [21–3].  

There  is  no  doubt  that  physical  activity  deficiency  has  a  direct  impact  on  the  physical  fitness 

components which are related to health in general and to the fitness cardiorespiratory system, in particular. 

Indeed,  the  results  of  several  research  studies  suggested  that  the  lack  of  physical  activity  in  people  with 

disabilities  has  an  impact  on  their  cardiorespiratory  fitness,  body  composition  and  muscle  strength  and 

endurance [41–16- 7].  

It is widely known that the visually impaired falls within the category of handicapped people. Several 

previously  reported  studies  on  blind  people  have  indicated  that  the  lack  of  physical  activity  reduces  the 

cardio-respiratory fitness as well as the muscle and bone strength [6–38-29-18].  

For this reason, it was decided to increase the amount of their physical activity which is supposed to 

affect  positively  their  maximum  oxygen  consumption.  If  the  effect  of  physical  inactivity  on  VO

2

max  is 


negative, then logically the increased physical activity must have a positive impact on the person. This has 

been confirmed by various studies, which concluded  that visually impaired people, who practice physical 

activities,  see  noticeable  improvement  in  their  physical  fitness  level  [1–33].  Obviously,  cardiorespiratory 

fitness is one of the components of physical fitness. 

The  above-mentioned  improvement  can  certainly  be  attributed  to  the  opportunity  given  to  this 

category  of  people  to  participate  in  physical  activities  because  they  usually  do  not  have  the  chance  to 

practice  sport  for  several  reasons,  i.e.  parents  fearing  for  their  children’s  security  or  even  psychological 

barriers. In fact, 58.9% of visually impaired people said that they generally are not given the opportunity to 

participate  in  physical  education  classes    [32].  However,  when  they  were  allowed  to  participate  in  sport 

activities, their VO

2

max was improved. Various studies found out that if visually impaired people are given 



the  chance  to  participate  in  normal  physical  activity,  then  they  will  surely  improve  their  physical  fitness, 

which  may  become  comparable  to  that  of  a  sighted  person  [34–4-42].  One  study  indicated  that  visually 

impaired people should be offered more opportunities to participate in physical activities because they can 

improve their health and fitness effectively through physical activity [23].  

Furthermore,  the  results  obtained  showed  that  the  applied  physical  fitness  program  had  a 

fundamental  role  in  this  improvement;  this  program  involved  various physical  exercises  and  the  students 

were given great flexibility in their actions. This has, undoubtedly, contributed to improve their VO

2

max, as 



a great deal of research indicated that sports programs develop and enhance fitness components [28–22-39]. 

Moreover, many other works showed that the cardiovascular fitness level of individuals in the study sample 

to which the program was applied had remarkably improved [14–9-11].  

It  is  clearly  seen  from  tables  05  that  body  fat  percentage  (BFP)  in  the  sample  have  decreased.  This 

improvement  is  mainly  due  to  the  high  level  of  physical  activity  of  the  visually  impaired  people.  Many 

studies have reported that one of the main causes of obesity among the blind or visually impaired people is 

physical inactivity or its insufficient practice [20–17-44].  


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



912 

 

 

 



Therefore, if the lack of physical activity leads to the rise in obesity, then a greater amount of physical 

exercises  would  certainly  cause  a  decline  in  the  proportion  of  fat  in  the  body,  because  in  this  case  the 

individual consumes more energy than when he is inactive; this is exactly what has been recommended by 

several researchers who stressed on the need to increase the amount of physical activity in order to reduce 

the obesity levels [25–27].  

Moreover, this improvement generally depends on the applied program. Indeed, one study confirmed 

the  need  to  develop  specific  programs  to  control  obesity  [30].  Some  other  research  studies  suggested  that 

members  of  the  experimental  sample  succeeded  in  reducing  their  obesity  level  after  application  of  the 

proposed program [35–9]. One other research work recommended additional aerobic activities for visually 

impaired people in order to reduce their obesity level [2].  In fact, this is exactly what was included in the 

program  applied  to  the  subjects  of  the  study  sample.  The  program  consisted  of  several  aerobic  exercises. 

Romijin et al (1993) indicated that the cause of low-fat content in the sample subjects, after they underwent 

aerobic activity, was due to the increased oxidation of fatty acids. 

References 

1.  American  Alliance  for  Health,  Physical  Education.  Reacreation  and  Dance.  Physical  best  activity  guide 

elementary level. Chainupaign, IL. Human kinetics. 1999. 

2. Anderson R E, Crespo C J, Bartlett S J, Cheskin L J, Pratt M. Relationship of physical activity and television 

watching with body weight and level of fitness among children. JAMA 1998; 279: 938-942. 

3. Aslan, Calik, Kitis. The effect of gender and level of vision on the physical activity level of children and 

adolescents with visual impairment. Res Dev disabil 2012; 33: 1794-1804. 

4. Blessing D L, McCrimmon D, Stovall J, Willi Ford H V. The effect of regular exercise programs for visually 

impaired and sighted school children. Journal of visual impairment & blindness 1993; 87: 50-52. 

5.  Buckworth  J,  Dishman  R  K,  O’Connor  P  J,  Tomporowski  P  D.  Exercise  psychology.  2and  Ed.  Human 

kinetics. 2013. 

6.  Capella,  McDonnal  M.  The  need  for  health  promotion  for  adults  who  are  visually  impaired.  Journal  of 

Visual Imapairment and Blindness 2007; 30:861-867. 

7. Carmeli E, Bar-Yossef T, Ariav C, Levy R, Lieberman D G. Perceptual motor coordination in persons with 

mild intellectual disability. Disability and rehabilitation 2008; 30: 232-329. 

8. Caroline M, Elizabeth A H. The impact of a school running program on health-related physical fitness and 

self-efficacy in youth with sensory impairments. PALAESTRA 2016; 30(1): 13-17. 

9.  Caroline M, Elizabeth A H. The impact of a school running program on health-related physical fitness and 

self-efficacy in youth with sensory impairments. PALAESTRA 2016; 30(1): 13-17. 

10.Cheikh Y, Zaoui M H. The Relationship between Maximum Oxygen Consumption (VO2 Max) and Body 

Fat Percentage of the Male Secondary School Pupils (15-18 Years). Journal of Health Science 2018; 6(4): 274-

277. 


11.Cheikh  Y,  Zenagui  S.  The  effect  of  a  physical  program  on  the  respiratory  cardio  fitness  of  blind  male 

students between 15 and 18 years old. European Journal of Physical Education and Science 2018; 4(7): 25-32. 

12.Cheikh  Y,  Kasmi  B,  Mehidi  M.    The  level  of  health-related  fitness  of  male  blind  versus  sighted  pupils. 

Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2018;177(10):587-91. 

13.Chen C C, Lin. S Y. The impact of rope jumping exercise on physical fitness of Visually impaired students, 

Research in Developmental Disabilities 2011; 32: 25–29. 

14.Cristiana  C,  et  al.  Antidepressant  Efficacy  of  adjunctive  aerobic  activity  and  associated  biomarkers  in 

major depression: a 4 week, Randomized single blind, controlled climical trial. Plos one 2015; 10: 1371. 

15.Dogra  S,  Stathokostas  L.  Sedentary  behavior  and  physical  activity  are  independent  predictors  of 

successful aging in middle-aged and older adults. J aging res. Article ID 190654. 2012. 

16.Frey  G  C,  Stanish  H  L,  Temple  V  A.  Physical  activity  of  youth  with  intellectual  disability.  Review  and 

research agenda adapted physical activity quarterly 2008; 25: 95-117. 

17.Greguol  M,  Gobbi  E,  Carraro  A.  Physical  acitvity  practice,  body  image  and  visual  impairment:  a 

comparison between Brazilian and Italian children and youth adolescents. Res Dev Disabil 2014; 35(1):21-26. 

18.Hinkson  E  A,  Curtis  A.  A  mesuring  physical  actavity  in  children  and  youth  living  with  intellectual 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



913 

 

 

 



disabilities. A systematic Review Research in Developmental Disabilities 2013; 34:72-86. 

19.Houotari T,  Nupponen  H, Mikkelson L, Laako L,  Kinjala U. Adolescent physical fitness and activity as 

prediactors of adulthood activity. Journal of sports sciences. 2011.  29(11): 1135-1141. 

20.Kakiyama T, Koda Y, Matsuda M. Effect of physical inactivity on aortic distensibility in visually impaired 

young men. Eur J Appl Physiol 1999; 79:205-211. 

21.Kosub F,  Oh H. An exploratory  study of physical  ativity levels in children and adolescents  with visual 

impairments. Clinical kinesiology 2004; 58: 1-7. 

22.Larsson  L,  Frandin  K.  Body  awareness  and  dance-based  training  for  persons  with  aquired  blindness 

effects on balance and gait speek. Visual impairment research 2006; 8: 25-40. 

23.Lieberman  L  J,  Byrne  H,  Mattern  C  O,  Watt  C  A,  Fernandez  V  M.  Health-related  fitness  of  youth  with 

visual impairments. Journal of visual impairments & blindness 2010; 104(06). 

24.Lieberman L J, McHugh E. Health-related fitness of children who are visually impaired. Journal of visual 

impairment & blindness 2001; 95: 272-287. 

25.Liv  B,  Lin  J.  Physical  activity,  physical  fitness  and  body  compsition  among  children  and  young  adults 

with visual impairments: A systematic review. British journal of visual imapirment. 2015.  33(3): 167-182. 

26.Longmuir P, Bar-Or O. Factors influencing the physical activity levels of youth with physical and sensory 

disabilities, Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly 2000; 17:40-53. 

27.Martin G, Christina T, Furgen G. Physical activity, bosu composition, and well-being of school children 

and youth with visual impairments in Germany. British journal of visual impairment. 2017. 35(2) : 120-129. 

28.Miszko T A, Ramsey V K, Blasch B B. Tai chi for people with visual impairments: A pilot study. Journal of 

visual impairment & blindness 2004; 98: 5-13. 

29.Mrmeleira J, Luis L, Olga M, Catarina P. Physical activity patterns in adults who are blind as assessed by 

accelerometry. Adapted physical activity quarterly 2014; 31: 283-296. 

30.Parizkova J, Hills A. Childhood obesity: prevention and management. Boca raton : CRC press. (2001). 

31.Pascolini D, Mariotti S P. Global estimates of visual imapirment: 2010, J Ophthalmol 2012; 96: 614-618. 

32.Ponchillia  P,  Armbruster  J,  Wiebold  J.  The  national  sports  education  camps  project:  Introducing  sports 

skills  to  students  with  visual  impairments  through  short  term  specialized  instruction.  Journal  of  visual 

imapairment & blindness 2008; 99: 685-695. 

33.Ponchillia P, Strause B, Ponchillia S. Athletes with visual impairment: Attributes and sport participation. 

Journal of visual impairment & blindness 2002; 96(4): 267-272. 

34.Ponchillia S V, Powell L L, Felski K A, Nicklawski M T. The effectiveness of aeobic exercise instruction for 

totally blind women. Journal of visual impairment & blindness 1992; 86: 174-177. 

35.Romijin J A, Klens S, Coyle E F, Siclossis C S, Wolf R R. Strenuous endurance training increases lipolysis 

and triglyceride-fatty acide cycling and rest. J Appl Physiol 1993; 75: 108-113. 

36.Schimid M, Nardone A, De Nunzio A,M, Schieppati M. Equilibrium during static  and dynamic tasks in 

blind subjects : no evidence of cross-modal palasticity . Brain 2007; 130(8) :2097-107. 

37.Sharon A P, Marilu D M. Fitnessgram/ Activitygram. 4th Ed. Dallas TX : The Cooper institute. 2013. 

38.Sit C, McManus A, McKenzie T L, Lian J. Physical activity levels of children in special schools. Prev med 

2007; 45 : 424. 

39.Surakka  A,  Kivela  T.    Motivating  visually  impaired  and  deaf  blind  people  to  perform  regular  physical 

exercise. British journal of visual impairment 2008; 26: 255-268. 

40.Tammelin T. Adolescent participation in sport and adult physical activity. American journal of preventive 

medicine 2003; 24(1): 22-28. 

41.Vliet P V, Rintala P, Frojd K, Verellen J, Houtte S V, Daly D J, et al. Physical fitness profile of elite athletes 

with intellectual disability. Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports 2006; 16: 417-425. 

42.Williams C A, Armstrong N, Eves N, Faulkner A. Peak aerobic fitness of visually impaired and sighted 

adolescent girls. Journal of visual impairment & blindness 1996; 90: 495-500. 

43.Winnick J P, Short F X. The national fitness test for youth with disabilities. State University of New York. 

College at brockport. 1998. 

44.Wrzesinska  M,  Beata  N,  Slawmir  M,  et  al.  Body  mass  index  and  waist  to  height  ratio  among 

schoolchildren with visual impairment. Medecine2016; 95:32. 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



914 

 

 

 



 

 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



915 

 

 

 



Culture-Specific Vocabulary in Teaching Children at Schools of Siberia

the North and the Far East of the RF  

 

Rosalia Serafimovna Nikitina



1

 

1 Federal State Scientific Institution "Scientific Research Institute of National Schools оf the Republic of Sakha 

(Yakutia)", Yakutsk, Russia.

 

Abstract 

The paper deals with culture-specific vocabulary as an organic connection of the native language with 

the versatile lifestyle, traditions and culture of the Evenki ethnos. The use of culture-specific vocabulary in 

teaching the native (Evenki) language and culture to the children is described. Scientific works on culture-

specific  vocabulary  were  analyzed.  The  research  of  Evenki  culture-specific  words in  school  textbooks  and 

study  guides  was  conducted  for  the  first  time.  The  paper  gives  examples  of  using  the  culture-specific 

vocabulary in teaching children at schools of the North. The culture-specific words were selected from the 

study guide "Lessons from ancestors" ("Hopkil binitēn"). The pilot testing work with the use of the author's 

study  guide  "Lessons  from  ancestors"  containing  the  culture-specific  vocabulary  was  organized  and 

performed.  Proceeding  from  the  research,  the  special  importance  of  the  culture-specific  vocabulary 

functioning  in  maintaining  the  memory,  thinking  and  self-expression  of  the  ethnos,  as  a  means  for 

developing the native (Evenki) language and its role in intercultural contacts, has been found. 





Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   156   157   158   159   160   161   162   163   ...   176


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling