International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology


Download 24.32 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet76/176
Sana05.12.2019
Hajmi24.32 Mb.
1   ...   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   ...   176

References 

Baksansky, O.E., Kucher, E.N. (2012). Cognitive construction of reality. Moscow: Book house "LIBROKOM".  

Baum, N.K. (2013). Emergence of On-Line Community. Virtual Research Methods, 1, 29–56. 

Berger,  T.,  Luckmann,  T.  (1995).  Social  construction  of  reality.  A  treatise  in  the  sociology  of  knowledge. 

Moscow: Science. 

Biketova,  Ya.O.  (2015).  Information  and  communication  competence:  sociological  analysis  and  empirical 

measurement. Bulletin of Economics, law and sociology, 2, 180-184. 

Bondarenko,  S.V.  (2004).  Social  structure  of  virtual  network  communities.  Rostov-on-don:  Rostov  state 

University. 

Boyd D., Ellison, N.B. (2007). Social Network Sites: Definition, History, and Scholarship. Journal of Computer-



Mediated Communication, 13(1), 116-124.  

Bresler,  M.G.  (2014).  Social  networks  and  network  communities  of  information  Society.  Ufa:  Editorial  and 

publishing center of Bashkirsky state university. 

Buch-Hansen, H. (2014). Social Network Analysis and Critical Realism. Theory Soc Behav, 44, 306-325.  

Candon, P. (2016). online public sphere or communicative capital? Blogs and news sites in Ireland 2010—13: 

PhD Thesis. Dublin: Trinity College, University of Dublin. 



International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



440 

 

 

 



Castells,  M.  (2004).  Informationalism,  networks,  and  the  network  society:  a  theoretical  blueprint.  The 

Network Society: a Cross-Cultural Perspective. Northampton: Edward Elgar.  

Davoudi  SMM,  Fartash  K,  Venera  G.  Zakirova,  Asiya  M.  Belyalova,  Rashad  A.  Kurbanov,  Anna  V. 

Boiarchuk,  Zhanna  M.  Sizova  (2018).  Testing  the  Mediating  Role  of  Open  Innovation  on  the  Relationship 

between  Intellectual  Property  Rights  and  Organizational  Performance:  A  Case  of  Science  and  Technology 

Park, EURASIA Journal of Mathematics Science and Technology Education, 14(4), 1359-1369.  

Dekalov,  V.V.  (2017).  Attention  as  a  basic  resource  of  communicative  capitalism.  Russian  school  of  public 

relations, 10, 27-38; 

Konoplitsky, S. (2004). Network communities as an object of sociological analysis. Sociology: theory, methods, 



marketing, 3, 167 – 178. 

Lectorsky,  V.A.  (2009).  Realism,  anti-realism,  constructivism  and  constructive  realism  in  the  modern 

epistemology of science philosophy. Constructivist approach in epistemology and human Sciences. Moscow: 

"Canon+", ROOI "Rehabilitation". 

Lenk,  G.K.  (2009).  Methodologies  of  constructive  realism.  Constructivist  approach  in  epistemology  and 

human Sciences. Constructivist approach  in epistemology and  human Sciences.  Moscow: "Canon+", ROOI 

"Rehabilitation". 

Luhmann, N. (1995). what is communication? Sociological journal, 3, 114-125. 

Luhmann, N. (2005). Society of society. Part II. Media communications.  Moscow: Logos. 

Luhmann, N. (2007). Social systems. Essay of General theory. St.Petersburg: Science. 

Lupanov, V.N. (2001). Internet as an object of sociological research (on the development of the sociological 

network on the Internet, Web-network).  Information society, 1, 40-43. 

Mumby, D.K. (2016). Organizing beyond organization: Branding, discourse, and communicative capitalism. 

Organization, 23, 884–907. 

Nazarchuk, A.V. (2011). On network research in social Sciences. Sociological research, 1, 39-51. 

Nevesenko, E.D. (2011). Specifics of formation and functioning of Internet communities: social aspect. Young 

scientist, 5(2), 88-92. 

Nixon,  B.  (2017).  Recovering  Audience  Labor  from  Audience  Commodity  Theory:  Advertising  as 

Capitalizing on the Work of Signification. New York: Routledge. 

Probst, F., Grosswiele, L., Pfleger, R. (2013). Who will lead and who will follow. Identifying Influential Users in 



Online Social Networks, Business & Information Systems Engineering, 5(3), 179–193. 

Raskin, J.D. (2006). Constructivist theories. Comprehensive handbook of personality and psychopathology. 

Personality and everyday functioning, New York: John Wiley. 

Rheingold,  H.  (2013).  The  Virtual  Community:  Homesteading  on  the  Electronic  Frontier.  URL: 

www.rheingold.com/vc/book (accessed 16.09.2013). 

Ryabchenko,  N.A.  (2016).  Place  names  of  the  networking  landscape  of  online  space.  Man.  Community 



(Management) 4, 98-115. 

Rykov, Y.G. (2015). Network inequality and the structure of online communities. Journal of sociology and social 



anthropology, 4(81), 12-34. 

Sergodeev,  V.A.  (2014).  Communicative  practices  of  networking  Internet  communities.  Bulletin  of  Adyghe 



state University, 135, 133-141. 

Tastan,  S.B.,  &  Davoudi,  S.M.M.  (2015).  An  Examination  of  the  Relationship  between  Leader-Member 

Exchange  and  Innovative  Work  Behavior  with  the  Moderating  Role  of  Trust  in  Leader:  A  Study  in  the 

Turkish Context. Procedia social and behavioral sciences, Elsevier, 181, 23-32. 

Tokareva,  S.B.  (2011).  Methodology  of  social  constructivism  and  social  constructivism  as  a  methodology. 

Bulletin of Volgograd state University Ser. 7. Philosophy, 2(14), 112-117. 

 

 



 

International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



441 

 

 

 



Philosophy of Being in L. N. Tolstoy’s Works of 1850-1860-Ies: a Man and 

Nature  

 

Victoria Volkova



1

*, 

 

Svetlana Ovcharova



2

,  

 

Olga Kolesnikova



3

,  

 

Tatiana Abramzon



4

,  

 

Svetlana Rudakova



5



Oksana Chernova

6

 and 

Tatiana Zaitseva



1Department of Law and Cultural Studies, Nosov Magnitogorsk State Technical University, Magnitogorsk, Russia. 

2 Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies, Nosov Magnitogorsk State Technical University, Magnitogorsk, 

Russia. 

3 Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies, Nosov Magnitogorsk State Technical University, Magnitogorsk, 

Russia. 

4 Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies, Nosov Magnitogorsk State Technical University, Magnitogorsk, 

Russia. 

5 Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies, Nosov Magnitogorsk State Technical University, Magnitogorsk, 

Russia. 

6 Department of Russian Language, General Linguistics and Mass Communication, Nosov Magnitogorsk State 

Technical University, Magnitogorsk, Russia. 

7 Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies, Nosov Magnitogorsk State Technical University, Magnitogorsk, 

Russia. 

*corresponding author 

Abstract 

The relevance of the research problem is due to the need to consider the dialectical relationship of the 

world of nature and world of the man in L. N. Tolstoy’s works of 1850-1860-ies; to determine the direction 

chosen by the writer in the study of the complex relationship between micro - and macrouniverse; to reveal 

the regularities of the process of ethical philosophical and aesthetic understanding of the world by early L. 

N. Tolstoy. The purpose of the article is to derive the formula of the existential dialectics of L. N. Tolstoy, to 

differentiate  the  concepts  of  cultural  /  natural  and  intelligent  /  instinctive.  The  leading  approach  to  the 

study  of  this  problem  is  a  comprehensive  one  that  combines  elements  of  hermeneutic,  comparative, 

narrative  and  biographical  methods.  The  article  proves  that  L.  N.  Tolstoy  in  definite  periods  of  his  life 

interpreted  differently  the  concepts  of  "nature"  and  "man".  In  1850-1860-ies,  he  perceived  «natural»  as  a 

synonym of vital, natural and absolute. Such a diverse semantics is explained, on the one hand, by the fact 

that nature is an objective world that exists independently of human consciousness; on the other hand, it is a 

fundamental property of nature, what is originally inherent in a man: the nature of character, the nature of 

the artistic image, the nature of a man. The world created by L. N. Tolstoy in his novel, is real, because it is 

based on the formula of existential dialectics: being  adjoins to being. All phenomena, processes,  objects of 

reality  are  considered  by  the  writer  according  to  the  scheme:  reality  (being  of  essence)  –  existence 

(connection of things) – essence (sense of things). Relationship with "macrocosm", according to L. N. Tolstoy, 

colours a lonely man's stay in the world, lonely because a person is endowed with a pronounced personality 

that  does  not  allow  him  to  feel  a  link  in  the  overall  chain.  Even  that  L.  N.  Tolstoy’s  character,  who  feels 

involved in the micro-process, cannot dissolve in it, since he is subject to the laws not only of the general, but 

also  of  individual  existence.  Exploring  human  nature,  L.  N.  Tolstoy  notes  that  the  main  cause  of  the 

misfortune  of  his  characters  is  a  conflict  of  cultural  and  natural,  rational  and  instinctive  principles. 

Emphasizing  the  complexity  and  richness  of  nature,  the  writer  avoids  direct  and  categorical  judgments, 

differently assessing the "natural" in a man. On the one hand, instinct is the guarantor of life, as it allows you 

to adapt to its conditions, to survive, to find your place, to defend it. On the other hand, instinct is perceived 

as something secondary to the mind, a more primitive beginning. L. N. Tolstoy in 1850-1860-ies considered 

those  characters  being  harmonious,  viable  and  integral  who  combine  the  biological  non-conflict  with  the 

spiritual one. The materials of the article are of practical value in the practice of University teaching for the 

development of training courses in Russian literature of the XIX century; in the development of training and 

teaching tutorials; in lexicographical practice for the compilation of a new type of dictionary – L. N. Tolstoy’s 

idioglossary. 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



442 

 

 

 



Keywords: L.N. Tolstoy,War and Peace, a man, nature, the philosophy of being.   

 

 

International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



443 

 

 

 



Introduction 

A human being, according to L. N. Tolstoy, contains  a part of the "Entity", and  under the latter  the 

writer understands the world in the broad sense of the word, the world through " decimal I" (Bilinkis, 1986). 

The world, the Entity, nature, natura – this is a synonymous series in the perception of the writer. However, 

L. N. Tolstoy considers that the ultimate goal of nature is a man. "What am I?"- the writer asks himself, as if 

he  is  interested  in  the  way  the  nature  "became  a  man"  (Tolstoy,  1984).  Consequently,  the  problem  of  the 

relationship  between  a  human  being  and  nature  can  be  represented  in  two  aspects:  a  man  in  nature  and 

nature in a man.  

The first aspect determines the place of the man in the world, the influence of nature both on him and 

on  the  system  of  his  aesthetic  and  moral  philosophical  views.  Researchers  of  L.  N.  Tolstoy’s  creativity, 

reflecting  on  the  variety  of  dialectical  connections  between  the  individual  and  the  Entity  in  the  artistic 

universe of the writer, adhere to the author's formula, derived in “Dnevnik” in 1857: "I love nature, when it 

surrounds me and then stretches across the  whole horizon, but  when I am in it... when you are not alone 

rejoice and enjoy the nature" (Tolstoy, 1984). 

Thus, L. N. Tolstoy tried in his diary notes to reveal the essence of his own method, which had already 

defined well in his first works by that time. His world is "I" and "not me", the latter includes not only the 

objectively  existing  reality  in  its  diverse  forms  (Gromov,  1997;  Fortunatov,  1983),  but  other  people 

(Slivitskaya, 1988; Saburov, 2009). L. N. Tolstoy represents life through the eyes of the artist, and his goal as 

an artist is to display reality so that "to pour into another his view at the sight of nature" (Tolstoy, 1984). 

As for the second aspect, the phrase "human nature" is the most frequently used in literary studies. So, 

V.D. Dneprov (2011) expands the meaning of this definition, including all the aspects that form a particular 

human  type:  for  example,  the  type  of  the  Rostovs,  the  type  of  the  Bolkonskys,  the  type  of  the  Kuragins, 

whereby  it  is  possible  to  speak  about  the  nature  of  Natasha,  Knyaz  Andrei,  Anatole  (Dneprov,  2011). 

However, in the strict sense, human  nature-is primarily the “wealth"  of its" biological  manifestations", the 

world of sensations and instincts. Prima facie such restriction of the meaning constrains the capabilities of 

the researcher, predetermines a kind of schematism in the study of a complex issue. However, at the same 

time, if one of the tasks is to identify the actual "natural" in L. N. Tolstoy’s characters, it is reasonable to use 

the combination of "human nature" in its second meaning, because this aspect is insufficiently studied. 



Methodological Framework 

The study is based on an integrated approach that combines elements of hermeneutic, comparative, 

narrative and biographical methods. 

The  hermeneutic  method,  which  presupposes  the  scientific  interpretation  of  subjectively  colored 

author's  statements,  gives  the  possibility  to  comprehend  the  numerous  meanings  of  the  problem  of 

interaction between a man and nature, taking into account the objective assessment of the time of creating an 

art work, the influence of traditions and cultural context. Comparative method makes it possible to consider 

the laws and principles of L. N. Tolstoy’s literary texts structuring, as well as their communicative essence, 

invariant in the structure and semantics of different texts. The narrative method allows us to consider a work 

of  art  as  a  result  of  aesthetic  communication  between  the  narrator  (narrator)  and  the  recipient  (reader), 

which reveals the underlying structures of the work. Biographical method based on the study of the writer's 

life,  analysis  of  autobiography,  research  of  diaries,  notebooks,  allows  studying  the  evolution  of  L.  N. 

Tolstoy’s  views  on  the  problem  of  the  relationship  between  a  man  and  nature.  This  method  provides  an 

opportunity to understand the work of the Russian classicist better, because throughout his life he had been 

keeping a diary. 

Results and Discussions 

Pondering  the  problem  of  the  interaction  of  a  man  and  nature,  and  highlighting  the  genesis  as  an 

artistic and philosophical category in L.N. Tolstoy’s creativity of 1860s, it is necessary to consider, firstly, the 

fact  that  the  writer  was  not  far  removed  from  philosophy,  even  in  his  younger  years;  secondly,  the 

relationship  between  a  man  and  nature  in  this  author’s  works  reveals  L.  N.  Tolstoy’s  special  opinion  on 

being human, which is a kind of original Tolstoy an ontology and anthropology. And finally, some natural 



International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



444 

 

 

 



images  (for  example,  astral  images  in  the  "War  and  Peace"),  as  well  as  landscapes  in  general,  are  so 

independent,  self-valuable  that  they  serve  as a  necessary  material  in  the  study  of  the  features of  Tolstoy's 

worldview (Lomunov, 2010). 

In  L.N.  Tolstoy's  works  natura  naturans  (creating  nature)  is  an  active  creative  subject:  creative, 

because creating, but at the same time devoid of reason. L.N. Tolstoy believes consciousness to be absolute 

value in a man (compare: the late L.N. Tolstoy's "reasonable consciousness"), pure and unchanged, making it 

possible to perceive phenomena in their unity and connectivity. The more intelligent a person is, the more 

artificial he is. Confirmation is in the image of the intellectual Knyaz Andrei: the Rostovs are clearer, simpler; 

Knyaz Andrei is more perfect and difficult. 

L.N.  Tolstoy’s  attitude  to  nature  is  close  to  the  pagan  worldview.  E.B.  Taylor  (1987),  an  English 

anthropologist, characterizes the peculiarity of pagan consciousness: "... a person sees the smallest details of 

the  world  around  him  as  manifestations  of  his  personal  life  and  will"  (Taylor,  1987).  Indeed,  the  oak  in 

Knyaz Andrei’s perception is not that other, as a manifestation of personal life and will: the character denies 

himself  the  pleasure  to  live  and  enjoy  life  and  sees  a  dying  oak,  then  comes  to  life  and  rejoices  the  tree 

covered with foliage. Nikolai Rostov notices a tree, as it seems to him, on the borderline between life and 

death, but, having crossed this line, he does not die. M.M. Bakhtin’s (2000) typical remark: "His [Tolstoy's] 

God is more reminiscent of the pagan Pan... than the Christian God: good thing that it does not come from 

me, not "I" (Bakhtin, 2000). 

The perception of nature as an active creative subject, its humanization brings L.N. Tolstoy with the 

old  Russian  tradition.  As  well  as  in  "The  Lay  of  Igor's  Warfare",  on  the  pages  of  "War  and  Peace"  the 

response  of  nature  to  events  in  human  life  attracts  readers’  attention.  Tolstoy  borrows  from  old  Russian 

works the method of comparison: comparing the world of man with the world of nature, the writer achieves 

the  clarity  that  allows  the  reader  to  understand  accurately  the  author's  idea  without  any  additional 

comments. Moreover, each character close to Tolstoy, somehow is involved in his dialogue with nature. This 

dialogue  allows  us  to  distinguish  the  category  of  being  as  an  artistic  and  philosophical  one  in  Tolstoy's 

works,  because  being  for  the  writer  is  primarily  an  artistic  universe  in  which  the  movement  of  human 

feelings  are  closely  related  to  natural  changes,  but  at  the  same  time  in  this  plexus  of  human  and  natural 

Tolstoy’s complex philosophical views on the world and a man are reflected.  

The  writer's  views  are  changeable.  Tolstoy  could  prove  the  idea  he  liked  once  in  his  social  and 

political  essays,  literary  creativity  and  correspondence  but  soon  for  reasons  known  to  only  his  genius, 

suddenly abandon it and say something opposite. V.I. Ivanov (2009), correlating L.N. Tolstoy with Russian 

culture of XIX-early XX centuries, noticed this fundamental feature, especially clearly manifested in the late 

work:  "Truly  above  all  he  wanted...  emancipation...  in  the  form  of...  exposure,  revelation,  simplification. 

From the power of the word itself, this artist of the word was steadily liberated, as he sought independence 

from  psychology,  this  clairvoyant  of  the  human  soul  and  the  natural  soul...  and  therefore  internally 

antinomic,  being  himself  an  anti-artistic  force.  For  that  is  the  work  of  the  artistic  genius  to  reveal  the 

noumenal in the vestment of the phenomenon..." (Ivanov, 2009). 

L.N. Tolstoy, at the beginning of his life was fond of Zh.-Zh. Rousseau (at the  age of 16 the writer was 

wearing a medallion with a portrait of Zh. Rousseau instead of the cross on the neck), and in the second half 

of  the  creative  way  he  worked  on  a  rational  resolution  of  the  "problem  of  life",  ignoring  "natural 

movements"; struggling with Orthodoxy and so much taken from it in his teaching "non-resistance to evil 

with violence»; who loved music, but in the 1890s wrote a meticulously unjust book against art, in his own 

way synthesized in his work elements of various philosophical doctrines, starting with Slavophilism of the 

first half of the XIX century and ending with the positivism of the end of this century (Maymin, 1978). As 

Tolstoy himself declared, in the early period of his activity, he had no deep knowledge of philosophy, but 

had  a  general  idea  of  the  history  of  European  philosophical  thought.  As  an  extraordinary  person,  L.  N. 

Tolstoy preferred to appeal to philosophers in search of confirmation of his own theories and assumptions. 

In the correspondence, in Tolstoy’s diary somehow the names of philosophers who at one time or another 

awakened the imagination of the Russian thinker are mentioned. What became apparent in the 1910s was a 

latent  period  in  the  1860s,  when  "War  and  Peace"  had  been  written.  Drawing  parallels  between  Tolstoy’s 

views and other philosophers, it should be remembered that they are conditional, since the writer himself 

1   ...   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   ...   176


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling