Introduction: Faces on the Stage and Faces in the Stalls


Download 313.75 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
bet1/4
Sana01.03.2020
Hajmi313.75 Kb.
  1   2   3   4

Notes

Introduction: Faces on the Stage and Faces in the Stalls

1. Alas, the use of the theater loophole to allow smoking was blocked by the

Minnesota Court of Appeals. (Kaiser, n.pag.)

1

The Subject is Performance: Goffman as Dramaturgical

Prophet

1. Actually, Gouldner might more accurately describe Goffman as posing indi-

viduals as holding ‘sign-value,’ referring here to the concept first raised by

Baudrillard in For a Critique of the Political Economy of the Sign and further

developed in The Mirror of Production.

2. Interestingly, Habermas’ critique of Goffman is remarkably similar to

Goffman’s similar treatment of George Herbert Mead.

3. This is echoed in the analysis of the German philosopher Ernst Tugendhat

(who admittedly is dealing with the Meadian rather than the Goffmanian

use of ‘role’), who describes role positions as ‘meaning offers,’ stressing the

semiotic/hermeneutic dimensions of role-play (p. 243).

4. This example is of special interest given the importance that childhood play

is given in the formation of the self within the pragmatist tradition. Mead

repeatedly invokes play as an initial exploration of otherness by the devel-

oping social self and, despite Goffman’s aforementioned critique of Mead,

he was clearly influenced by the pragmatist tradition (especially as processed

through Blumer and Cooley). That role distance is a part of these early play

experiences is certainly provocative in this light, suggesting the doubleness

of role-play would also be constitutive of selfhood.

5. Fredric Jameson, in a 1974 review of Frame Analysis for Theory and Society,

also cites ‘key’ as the most interesting of Goffman’s conceptual contribu-

tions in the book; while my understanding of the key is rather different from

Jameson’s, I want to acknowledge a shared appreciation here. More recently,

the well-known sociolinguist George Lakoff has noted the influence of Frame



Analysis on his theorization on the production of political meaning.

6. In a footnote of his own, Goffman admits that, musicologically, ‘key’ is per-

haps not as apt as ‘mode’ for the process he is describing, but I agree with

Goffman that the technical aspects of the concept are less significant than

its cultural-symbolic character (see 1974, p. 44).

7. It is worth noting that Goffman expressed a good deal of reservation about

pragmatism (esp. Mead) and attempted to distance himself from an ortho-

dox pragmatist position. In any case, Goffman’s avoidance of much explicit

philosophical analysis (as noted) makes his relationship to any established

school of thought difficult to identify precisely.

191


192

Notes

8. As I have previously argued, Mead’s position here bears a very interesting

resemblance to Foucault’s analysis of classical forms of subjectivity, particu-

larly as the latter is interpreted by Gilles Deleuze (see Bailey, pp. 26–27).

9. Another important perspective here, one that would link Mead and Goffman

both chronologically and in theoretical terms, would be that of Kenneth

Burke, who analyzes role-play in literary and rhetorical terms. For an inter-

esting treatment of Burke’s relationship to Goffman, see Joseph Gusfeld’s

excellent introduction to the 1989 anthology Kenneth Burke on Symbols and

Society.

10. Goffman’s analysis of ‘face’ issues is intriguing in light of Raffel’s critique, of

course, as Levinas placed great stress on the importance of the face in the

engagement with otherness.

11. In Stigma, Goffman offers an extensive discussion of communities of ‘sympa-

thetic others’ built on a shared Stigma and, as noted, his sense of the ‘courtesy

stigma’ poses the relative portability (and thus symbolic character) or a range

of stigmatic phenomena (see pp. 19–32, especially).



2

Performance Anxiety: Role-ing with Lacan

1. Interestingly, Terry Eagleton makes a very similar point in contrasting Lacan’s

notion of subjectivity with that of his purported follower Louis Althusser,

arguing that Althusser fails to recognize—through a rather elementary mis-

reading that confuses the ego with the subject—the complexity of the

Lacanian subject (pp. 144–45).

2. Although as Sharpe notes, Jacques Derrida spots a considerable existential

bent in much of Lacan’s work, dedicating some of his encomium ‘For the

Love of Lacan’ to this point.

3. Here, I would recognize Žižek’s important analysis of Lacan’s relationship with

a post-structural model of subjectivity (or ‘subject-positions’ as opposed to

subjects) in which he argues, quite convincingly, that Lacan is not positing

the former but rather retaining a more coherent notion of the subject, albeit

as ‘lack’ (1989, pp. 174–76).

4. As Žižek points out in a discussion of the Hegelian dimensions of Lacanian

analytic practice, Lacan defines the final stage of analysis as ‘subjective des-

titution,’ in which the ‘subject no longer presupposes himself as subject’

and refuses the symbolization of the real that makes subjective existence

possible.

5. It is important to note that Lacan’s position on the curative possibilities (and

even the possibility as such) of ‘true speech’ shifted throughout his career and

indeed his overall view of the alienation intrinsic to the act of speech evolves

significantly over the course of the seminars. I am largely sidestepping many

of the nuances of these shifts in thinking, but I wish to avoid the impression

that there is a single, monolithic sense of the social-symbolic dynamics of

speech in his work.

6. Indeed, for Lacan psychosis is a sort of language disorder that results from a

failure to pass through symbolic castration and a resolution of the Oedipus

complex, and one that is marked by a profound instability and an ‘asymbolic’

existence.



Notes

193


7. Berger mentions that ‘when these suspicions [regarding the symbolic orga-

nization of existence] invade the central areas of consciousness they take

on, of course, the constellations that modern society would call neurotic or

psychotic,’ thus echoing Lacan at a more clinical level as well (p. 23).

8. Of course, Lacan’s ideas are often seen in a rather different light and, like Rank,

Lacan was cast out of orthodox circles, being expelled from the International

Psychoanalytic Association in 1963.

9. Interestingly, Rank’s reflections on homosexual desire and art and Lacan’s

connection of homosexuality, particularly female homosexuality, and hyste-

ria have a strong similarity, despite the former coming long after Rank’s break

with Freud (at least partly over the centrality of sexuality in the Freudian

position) (see Rank, pp. 52–58).



3

Liquid Stages and Melting Frames: Objective

De-Stabilization

1. Lauren Langman’s ‘Alienation and Everyday Life: Goffman Meets Marx at

the Shopping Mall’, which extensively engages Baudrillard’s thought, is an

exception, although the author connects the two theorists in a manner very

different from my own.

2. I should mention that this is not the first attempt to place Baudrillard

alongside psychoanalysis, as in Charles Levin’s admirable essay ‘Power and

Seduction: Baudrillard, Critical Theory and Psychoanalysis.’ However, Levin’s

interest is in Winnicott’s object-relations psychoanalytic paradigm and also in

Baudrillard’s early work (indeed being quite hostile to the later writing).

3. There is an interesting overlap here with the thinking of the contemporary

Heideggerean philosopher Hubert Dreyfus, author of What Computers Can’t



Do: The Limits of Artificial Intelligence and a revised edition entitled What Com-

puters Still Can’t Do. Dreyfus argues that attempts at artificial intelligence will

fail because they are unable to take into account the embodied character

of human thought and are ultimately reliant upon a model of thought as

information.

4. Badiou’s book on Deleuze, The Clamor of Being, deals extensively with the lat-

ter’s relationship with Heidegger. Badiou poses Deleuze’s philosophical work

as a radical extension of much of Heidegger’s thinking. This is a controver-

sial position, but one that I find compelling and quite justified. Žižek’s Organs



without Bodies tries to reread Deleuze in a Hegelian-Lacanian framework (a rad-

ical reading, to be sure), but recognizes the major conflicts in the relationship

of the two thinkers.

5. The influence of Sartre on Baudrillard is rarely acknowledged in its fullness,

but certainly emerges from a full encounter with the corpus of his work.

4

From Looking to Being to Killing: Performance Anxiety

in Recent French Language Cinema

1. Contemporary European systems of film production can render a precise

national identification for a film difficult, so ‘French’ here is shorthand for


194

Notes

films in the French language that examine issues germane to contemporary

French culture.

2. ‘Theorizing’ here is understood along the lines developed by Alan Blum in

his titular book, with theory as an opening of conversation, of the initiation

of a dialogue.

3. Interestingly, Bordwell has been engaged in a particularly vituperative intel-

lectual exchange with Slavoj Žižek over the relative merits of ‘cognitivist’

and psychoanalytic strategies for analyzing films. It is perhaps significant

that the films of Kieslowski (as interpreted by Žižek in his 2001 book, The



Fright of Real Tears) were central to the latter’s attacks on Bordwell’s position

regarding the weaknesses and dogmatism of psychoanalytic film theory.

4. It is unclear (and probably irrelevant) whether or not Haneke intended this

replication as an homage or a more neutral borrowing. Interestingly, the

ending of Lynch’s earlier Blue Velvet replicates a scene from Luis Bunuel’s

Susana in a similar manner.

5. At least initially, as the nature of the video images become increasingly

intense and horrifying in Lost Highway.

6. 1999’s The Straight Story is an exception.

7. Arquette plays both ordinary Renee Madison and femme fatale Alice

Wakefield, a strategy repeated with Naomi Watts playing Betty Elms and

Diane Selwyn in Mulholland Drive.

8. Haneke drives the point home—and not particularly subtly—by using

newscasts reporting on the invasion of Iraq in the background of several

scenes.


9. ‘Money and Brains’ is the name of a geodemographic cluster used by mar-

keting organizations to determine likely patterns of cultural consumption

and refers to geodemographic groups with ‘high incomes, advanced degrees,

and sophisticated tastes to match their credentials’. See Weiss, The Clustered



World.

10. The suicide, it should be noted, is actually somewhat ambiguous in that

Ericka walks out of the concert hall after stabbing herself in the heart, rather

than falling to the floor. However, she appears to have stabbed herself in the

heart with a large knife, which suggests a fatal self-injury.

11. Film scholar Annette Insdorf makes this point in her commentary included

on the Red DVD.

12. Kieslowski was noted for his frequent use of doppelgangers in his films;

indeed, The Double Life of Veronique, his last film before beginning the Three

Colors trilogy, is built around the use of this plot device. (Note here the simi-

larity with David Lynch’s use of dual character structures in Mulholland Drive

and Lost Highway).

13. Innsdorf, in the aforementioned DVD commentary, quite reasonably inter-

prets the statement as a return to sexual potency.

14. Romand’s story was dramatized in a film entitled The Adversary in 2002; this

film was a much more faithful recounting of Romand’s life and crime. Time

Out, as noted, changes the ending, the main character’s employment, and

a variety of other aspects of the story, though it retains many of the details

(the use of Geneva, Switzerland as a hideout/place of fake employment, the

financial scams, and other elements of Romand’s life) of the actual story.

15. Of course, this is an eerie echo of Romand’s own homicidal fury.


Notes

195


16. New York Times critic Stephen Holden notes the similarity in visual style of

the two films in his negative review of She’s One of Us.

17. In this depiction, she complements the beautiful female protagonists of

Kieslowski’s earlier films in the Three Colours trilogy, Blue and White, played

by Juliette Binoche and Julie Delpy. The former is defined by a melancholic

removal and the latter by a cunning sensuality. Jacob would later play a

woman preparing to become a nun in Michaelangelo Antonioni’s 1995 film

Beyond the Clouds, which takes the nature of desire as its central theme.

Interestingly, Antonioni directed a kind of ur-text to the films discussed in

this chapter with 1975’s The Passenger, a brilliant film exploring some of

the peculiarities of identity and the contingencies of personhood. In it, Jack

Nicholson plays a reporter who switches identity with a similar-looking man,

an international arms dealer, when the latter dies in an adjacent room in a

hotel in a remote African village.

18. A much-admired scene in which Bateman and his colleagues compare

business cards presents this status game as high drama and displays an

almost-pornographic gaze at the cards, with each banker describing the spec-

ifications (font, paper type) of his particular card accompanied by ominous

background music.

19. Another extremely memorable scene in American Psycho features a naked

Patrick Bateman chasing rival Paul Allen through his apartment building

wielding a chainsaw.

20. An essay by John Champagne in Bright Lights Film Journal offers an exten-

sive Lacanian analysis of The Piano Teacher. Champagne makes the point

that the film ‘seems like an introduction to the work of Freud and his French

disciple, Jacques Lacan

. . .’ (n.pag).

21. As with American PsychoSalo was the cause of a great deal of controversy,

largely because of its depiction of grotesque sado-masochistic sexual prac-

tices involving children. The film is also noteworthy in the context of this

chapter as it is a clear cinematic ancestor to many of Michael Haneke’s films,

particularly 1997’s Funny Games and 2009’s The White Ribbon.

22. A sort of microcosmic version of the genocidal urge to wipe the slate clean

and begin with a new society one sees, especially, in the Cambodian Khmer

Rouge regime. Interestingly, such regimes were built on a model of ‘year zero’

as launching a new man, a new social subject.

23. Open holes, such as wells and graves, were a subject of much symbolic

reflection in early Freudian literary and cultural criticism, representing

vaginas and, consequently, castration anxiety. Michel thus appears—again

rather pedantically—to overcome his castration complex with the murder of

Harry/Dick.

24. Majid commits suicide, but the immediate cause of his bloody self-

destruction is the false accusation of kidnapping Pierrot, Georges’ son.

25. Indeed, Bourdieu placed second on an oft-discussed 2007 list of the most

cited academic writers in the humanities. For comparison, Goffman finished

fifth, Lacan was ranked thirty-fourth, and Baudrillard failed to make the top

forty.

26. Interestingly, Bourdieu has written quite extensively on the issue of uni-



versalizing within social thought and especially the tendency for French

intellectuals to engage in a rhetoric of universalization.



196

Notes

27. It is worth noting that Bourdieu includes a detailed exploration of the

culinary preferences of various strata of French society in Distinction.

28. Given the more seriously toned discussions of French geopolitical

insecurities (particularly those surrounding immigration and the Muslim

population of France), it is interesting that Steinberger describes French cui-

sine lightly as ‘one of the most benign forms of imperialism the world has

ever seen’.

29. Recall the passage from Kundera’s Slowness cited in the first chapter; it should

be noted that the novel is from Kundera’s ‘French’ period—the era in which

he was living in France and writing in French.

30. In addition to Winter’s book, see for example Joan Wallace Scott’s The Politics



of the Veil (2007), Cecile Laborde’s Critical Republicanism: The Hijab Con-

troversy and Political Philosophy (2008), and John Bowen’s Why the French

Don’t Like Headscarves: Islam, The State, and Public Space (2006) for academic

analysis of the issue in contemporary France.

31. Kieslowski died shortly after the completion of the Three Colors trilogy thus

finishing his career in France, and Haneke has worked in German (The White



Ribbon), English (a remake of the earlier German-language Funny Games), and

French (Amour) in recent years.

32. In The Seventh Continent (based on a true story), an upper-middle-class family

commits suicide after systematically destroying all of their possessions and

flushing their money down the toilet. The film reflects a less nuanced version

of many of the critiques of the dehumanizing nature of consumer society

that appear in Hidden and The Piano Teacher.

33. This is not intended as a general evaluation of either cinematic tradition,

of course, and the decline of European art cinema has certainly been the

source of a good bit of film critical attention in recent years. Also, the work of

David Lynch (described extensively above) suggests that simplified notions

of aesthetic character for American versus European films is silly indeed.

34. It is worth noting that Weir, like Haneke and Kieslowski, works as an expa-

triate within a national cinema. He emerged as a major Australian filmmaker

in the 1970s but has worked within Hollywood since 1985’s Witness.

35. Of course, this larger theme has a very long history in American cinema, with

prominent examples such as Billy Wilder’s 1951 Ace in Hole/The Big Carni-

val which depicts the pre-television (print media, primarily) transformation

of a mine tragedy into spectacle, and Albert Brooks’ critically praised 1979

comedy Real Life, which parodied the production of the Public Broadcasting

System (PBS) ur-reality television series The Loud Family.

36. The film bears a considerable similarity to Sydney Lumet’s earlier Dog Day

Afternoon (1975), although that film does not explore the television spectacle

to the degree of Mad City.

37. Once again, this is a well-worn moral trope in cinema, with Sidney Lumet’s

Network (1976) and Hal Ashby’s Being There (1979) as archetypal (and

critically venerated) examples.

38. Interestingly, Schepisi comes out of the same Australian film scene that

produced The Truman Show, director Peter Weir.

39. Snider was the lead singer of the very popular 1980’s glam metal band

Twisted Sister.



Notes

197


40. The film tapped into a cultural fascination at the time with extreme forms

of body modification (as in the Jim Rose Circus Sideshow) and used it as a

means of promoting the film.

41. Snider himself famously testified before the U.S. Congress against labeling

music for objectionable content, a drive linked to religious conservatives

(although one of the leaders of the Parents Music Resource Coalition, a

leading advocacy group, was Tipper Gore, wife of future Vice President Al

Gore).


42. This fear was compounded when it was widely reported that the film was

a favourite of notorious Midwestern killer Edwin Hall, with some specula-

tion that Hall’s crime, the kidnapping, torture, and murder of an 18-year-old

woman whose father worked in law enforcement, was directly inspired by

similar events in the film.

43. A superb example of an earlier depiction of this sort of transformation is

Nicholas Ray’s 1956 masterpiece Bigger Than Life, in which a school teacher

assumes a kind of Nietzschean superman personality due to the side effects

of cortisone that he is prescribed to combat a rare inflammatory disease.

A later but also interesting example is Joseph Ruben’s 1987 horror-thriller



The Stepfather (remade by Nelson McCormack in 2009), in which a seem-

ingly all-American man assumes the titular role with a number of families,

murdering them when they fall short of his desires for the perfect family.

44. See Bailey and Hay, ‘Cinema and the Premises of Youth: Teen Films and Their

Sites in the 1980s and 1990s’.

45. Interestingly, in Haneke’s The Seventh Continent (described in note 29), the

family’s suicide includes their final moments watching television followed

by alternating shots of a television with no signal (and the correlate noise

on the soundtrack) and flashbacks to earlier events in the film, somewhat

heavy-handedly analogizing the dead television with the dying family. The

effect is to implicate the spectator in a voyeuristic enjoyment of the suicide,

a cinematic strategy repeated more dramatically in 1997’s Funny Games.

46. Against the monkeys-typing-Hamlet scenario he mocks in Cool Memories 2.

47. I use the term ‘quasi-ethnographic’ given the large and rich body of literature

in Anthropology and other disciplines dealing with the limits and possibili-

ties of new (and often more poetic) forms of ethnographic discourse. An early

and excellent example of this work can be found in the collection Writing

Culture: The Politics and Poetics of Ethnography edited by James Clifford and

George Marcus.

48. A similar moment occurs in Antonioni’s The Passenger, mentioned in note

13, when Jack Nicholson methodically peels the photo off from the passport

of a suddenly-deceased man at the same remote African hotel and replaces it

with his own, and is thus able to assume the identity of the dead man.

49. This aspect of the judge’s attitude is quite similar to that of Julie, the main

character in Kieslowski’s Blue, the first film in his Three Colors trilogy, who

tries to live a life free of desire and any emotional attachment after the death

of her husband and daughter in a tragic auto accident.

50. At the risk of being repetitive, Sartre’s deep influence on Goffman is worth

reiterating here. While no reasonable person would claim Goffman as a

French thinker, or even perhaps a Francophile, he is less distant from the

Continental tradition than might be assumed.



198

Notes



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling