Is not who you think she is


Download 48.58 Kb.

Sana29.03.2018
Hajmi48.58 Kb.

Mona Lisa

 is not who you think she is

P a s c a l

c o t t e

V I N c I 

ÉDItIoNs


Mona Lisa is not who you think she is.

The book that rewrites history.

390 illustrations.

Hidden Portraits

 

 

 



M

u l t i s p e c t r a l s

 

s

t u d i e s



Hidden P

or

tr



aits

M

u



l

t

is



p

e

c



t

r

a



l

s

 s



t

u

d



ie

s

M o N a   l I s a



lUMIÈRe oN tHe

Leonardo da Vinci

M

o

N



a

l



I

sa

lUMIÈR



e o

N

 t



H

e

Leonardo 



da V

inci


P

as

cal



c

o

t



t

e

V



I

N

c



I 

ÉDI


tIo

N

s



T

he Mona Lisa is one of mankind’s great mysteries. 

With over 9.7 million admirers per year, it is the 

most mythical painting of all time. Thanks to an extraordinary sci-

entific imagery technique (L.A.M.), this book takes us on a journey 

into the heart of the paint-layer of the world’s most famous pic-

ture and reveals secrets that have remained hidden for 500 years. 

Mona Lisa is not actually Lisa Gherardini, wife of Francesco del 

Giocondo, but a portrait that masks others. Leonardo da Vinci did 

not paint one, but four portraits, super-imposed on one another. 

More than 150 discoveries help us rediscover the painting’s gen-

esis, with Cotte reconstituting the true portrait of Lisa Gherardini 

– whose face, hairstyle and costume were radically different from 

those we now see in the Louvre. The book shatters the myth and 

alters our vision of the work. It is a giant leap forward in art knowl-

edge and art history. Pascal Cotte, who digitized the Mona Lisa at 

the Louvre with his multispectral camera in October  2004, now 

presents the fruit of ten years’ research.

Pascal Cotte

P

ascal Cotte is an optical engineer specializing in 



photography and image signal analysis. He is the 

inventor of the L.A.M. scientific imagery technique and the 

first high-definition multispectral camera, which he has used 

to digitize several works by Leonardo da Vinci : the Louvre’s 

Mona  Lisa, in October  2004 ;  The Lady with an Ermine in 

Cracov, in September  2007 ;  La Bella Principessa in 2008 ; and 

La Belle Ferronnière in  2011. All told, Cotte has digitized over 

2,000 works in public and private collections, and authored sev-

eral studies scientific about famous paintings. His book Lumière on  

The Lady with an Ermine reconstitutes the three phases of that 

painting’s creation, including one version without an animal. 

Since 2007 Cotte’s exhibition The Secrets of Mona Lisa, produced 

by Australia’s Grande Exhibitions, has been seen by over 8 million 

visitors on all five continents.

T

he book reveals that the Mona  Lisa is not 



Lisa  Gherardini, wife of Francesco del Giocondo, 

and that her identity has been mistaken for 500 years. Using a new 

scientific imaging technique (L.A.M.), Cotte unveils over 150 dis-

coveries found beneath all the repaintings. He establishes the 

chronology of the various paint-layers and reveals the authen-

tic portrait of Lisa  Gherardini, of which he proposes a realistic 

reconstitution. She has more feminine face and looks to her right, 

with a different posture; there is no dark veil, while her clothes 

(gamure) and hairstyle (foggia alla francese) reflect Florentine 

fashion between 1502-07. Her dress has pretty tied ribbons (nastri)  

and openings (finestrelle) that reveal her chemise underneath. Her 

hair is held in place by a net (velo) and embroidery around her 

forehead. This was the portrait of a dignitary’s wife, typical of 

the Florentine upper-classes. The extraordinary discovery recon-

ciles the various existing theories about the history of this Symbol 

of Western Art. Cotte goes even further, helping us discover two 

other projects hidden beneath deeper repaintings. He reveals an 

impressive head-dress made from draperies, hair-pins and pearls 

(probably for a Madonna or Saint) ; and the forms and outline of 

another, larger portrait. The book enables readers to superimpose 

use four moveable transfer sheets, featuring the surrounds of the 

discoveries, on the images so as to chart the four stages of the 

work’s evolution. The reader can thuis conduct his own investiga-

tion. Why did Leonardo transform the portrait of Lisa Gherardini 

into the Mona Lisa ? The answer, suggests Cotte, lies with the story 

of Giuliano de’ Medici – the very man Leonardo himself, speak-

ing at the end of his life, referred to as the portrait’s commissioner.

ISBN : 978-29-548-2584-7

5 4 9 9 5

£29.95 / $49.95

JAQUETTE_MONNA_LISA_USA_GB_02_01.indd   1

21/09/2015   17:06

T

he

 



book

 

ThaT



 

rewriTes


 

hisTory


2004

The L.A.M. technique is based 

on images obtained by the 

multispectral camera, recording 

the light reflected on 13 

wavelengths (filters). It generates 

over 1,650 images, capturing 

the interaction between light 

and matter at all depths of 

the paint-layer. The technique 

makes it possible to reconstitute 

the genesis of a work, its 

chronology and the different 

phases that compose it.

Pascal Cotte digitizing the 

Mona Lisa at the Louvre  

with his Multispectral Camera

A TECHNIQUE OF SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS THAT SHATTERS

WHAT WE THOUGHT WE KNEW


2015

150 Groundbreaking 

Discoveries

Pascal Cotte’s scientific discoveries rewrite the 

history of a mythical work that has become the 

emblem of Western Art.

They lead to the hypothesis that the Mona  Lisa was 

painted in four main stages :

1/ Leonardo painted a 1st portrait, slightly lar-

ger than today – perhaps the draft for the 2

nd

 portrait. 



Nothing enables us to say who is represented. The 

posture seems identical to the portrait as it appears 

today. The hands placed on the arm-rest and the slee-

ves are similar but slightly larger.

2/ Leonardo effaced this draft and painted a 2

nd 


portrait. The discovery of a head-dress made of pearls, 

draperies and hair-pins suggests the subject may have 

been sacred or mythological – perhaps a Goddess

Saint or Madonna.

3/ Above this Leonardo then painted a 3

rd

 por-



trait, with a hairstyle and dress typical of Florentine 

fashion from the years 1502-06. It is suggested that 

this is the veritable portrait of Lisa Gherardini seen by 

Florentines and described by Vasari.

4/ Finally, Leonardo transformed this work into the 

Mona Lisa we know today, altering the posture, tur-

ning the head and eyes towards the viewer, moving 

the shoulders more to the right and adding a veil 

around the head and upper body to mask the former 

hairstyle and dress. 

the MoNa lIsa

165


From

Lisa


Gherardini

to the


Mona

Lisa


(approximative dates)

1501

1503

1505

1507

1509

1511

1513

1515

1517

1519

Where was  

Leonardo ?

Florence


Milan

Rome


Amboise

Leonard  

da Vinci died 

on May 2


Leonardo  

da Vinci 

left Italy for 

France


Draft Portrait

Portrait  

with Pearls

Lisa Gherardini

Mona Lisa

Transformed 

at request 

of Giuliano 

de' Medici

Livre 2_GB.indb   165

31/08/2015   15:42


Pascal COTTE

Summary


The book reveals that the 

Mona Lisa is not Lisa Gherardini, wife of Francesco del Giocondo, and that her identity has been mistaken for 500 years. Using a new sci-

entific imaging technique (L.A.M.), Cotte unveils over 150 discoveries found beneath all the repaintings. He establishes the chronology of the various paint-layers and 

reveals the authentic portrait of 

Lisa Gherardini, of which he proposes a realistic reconstitution. She has more feminine face and looks to her right, with a different 

posture ; there is no dark veil, while her clothes (gamure) and hairstyle (

foggia alla francese) reflect Florentine fashion between 1502-07. Her dress has pretty tied 

ribbons (

nastri) and openings (finestrelle) that reveal her chemise underneath. Her hair is held in place by a net (velo) and embroidery around her forehead. This was 

the portrait of a dignitary’s wife, typical of the Florentine upper-classes. The extraordinary discovery reconciles the various existing theories about the history of this 

Symbol of Western Art. Cotte goes even further, helping us discover two other projects hidden beneath deeper repaintings. He reveals an impressive head-dress made 

from draperies, hair-pins and pearls (probably for a Madonna or Saint) ; and the forms and outline of another, larger portrait. The book enables readers to superimpose 

use four moveable transfer sheets, featuring the surrounds of the discoveries, on the images so as to chart the four stages of the work’s evolution. The reader can 

thuis conduct his own investigation. Why did Leonardo transform the portrait of 

Lisa Gherardini into the Mona Lisa ? The answer, suggests Cotte, lies with the story 

of Giuliano de’ Medici – the very man Leonardo himself, speaking at the end of his life, referred to as the portrait’s commissioner.

Presentation

The 


Mona Lisa is one of mankind’s great mysteries. With over 9.7 million admirers per year, it is the most mythical painting of all time. Thanks to an extraordinary 

scientific imagery technique (L.A.M.), this book takes us on a journey into the heart of the paint-layer of the world’s most famous picture and reveals secrets that 

have remained hidden for 500 years. 

Mona Lisa is not actually Lisa Gherardini, wife of Francesco del Giocondo, but a portrait that masks others. Leonardo da Vinci 

did not paint one, but four portraits, super-imposed on one another. More than 150 discoveries help us rediscover the painting’s genesis, with Cotte reconstituting the 

true portrait of 

Lisa Gherardini – whose face, hairstyle and costume were radically different from those we now see in the Louvre. The book shatters the myth and 

alters our vision of the work. It is a giant leap forward in art knowledge and art history. Pascal Cotte, who digitized the 

Mona Lisa at the Louvre with his multispectral 

camera in October 2004, now presents the fruit of ten years’ research.

Biography

Pascal Cotte is an optical engineer specializing in photography and image signal analysis. He is the inventor of the L.A.M. scientific imagery technique and the first 

high-definition multispectral camera, which he has used to digitize several works by Leonardo da Vinci : the Louvre’s Mona Lisa, in October 2004 ; 

The Lady with an 

Ermine in Cracov, in September 2007 ; La Bella Principessa in 2008 ; and La Belle Ferronnière in 2011. All told, Cotte has digitized over 2,000 works in public and private 

collections, and authored several studies scientific about famous paintings. His book Lumière on 

The Lady with an Ermine reconstitutes the three phases of that 

painting’s creation, including one version without an animal. Since 2007 Cotte’s exhibition 

The Secrets of Mona Lisa, produced by Australia’s Grande Exhibitions, has 

been seen by over 8 million visitors on all five continents.

Informations

Section : Fine Art

Text : Pascal Cotte

Date of first sale : 12/2015

Size closed : 23,5 x 30,5 cm

Number of page : 220

Illustrations : 390

retail price : £29,95 / $49,95

Distribution : ACC book distribution LTD

Diffusion : 

French Version ISBN ean13 : 9782954825830

English Version ISBN ean13 : 9782954825847

LuMIère ON THe 

M O N A   L I s A

Hidden Portraits



54995


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling