Joanna: a friend of Jesus


Download 138.07 Kb.

Sana22.11.2017
Hajmi138.07 Kb.

 

www.susanmcgeown.com 



1

Joanna:  A Friend of Jesus 

 

 

 

Satisfy us in the morning with your unfailing love,  

that we may sing for joy and be glad all our days. 

~Psalm 90:14 

 

Joanna was among the last at the cross, and among the first to witness the empty tomb and likewise 

among the first to proclaim that the Lord whom she had so dearly loved was risen indeed.   (2) 

 

Read Her 



Story: 

Luke 8:1-3, 24:1-10 

Matthew 14:1-12 and Luke 23:7-12 for background on Herod and his court. 

Questions to 

ask yourself as 

you do this 

study: 

1.  Was Christ’s policy of inclusion of women in his entourage to include them as part of 

his wider ministry goals of preaching and teaching or simply to provide for the 

numerous domestic responsibilities that everyday life created?  What do you base your 

opinion on? 



2.  How do you think Joanna’s involvement with the ministry of Christ affected her 

husband Chuza’s position in Herod’s court? 



3.  No one speaks of Joanna’s bravery in the face of her devotion to Christ and his 

ministry.  What did she risk in her friendship, support, and outright devotion to Jesus? 



4.  Given the controversial nature of Jesus’ ministry and the current status of women at 

this time, what can you conclude about Joanna’s relationship with her husband given the 

extensive amount of time and money she contributes to the Cause of Christ? 

 

Her name 

Her name means “The Lord Gives Graciously”; it is the female of Joannes, Johanah, or 

John. 


Her Time in 

History 

AD 30  (32) 



Her Promises 

In Scripture 

Psalm 30:5, Psalm 65:8, Psalm 90:14, Isaiah 26:19 



Her Profession  Wife, Philanthropist to Christ’s ministry 

Her Home 

Jerusalem 



Did You Know  ·  Only boys received formal training outside the home.  They began by meeting in the 

teacher’s house, were they read from scrolls containing small portions from the 

Scriptures.  When the boys were old enough to learn the sabbatical lessons, they met at 

the “house of the Book” – the synagogue.  Later they were allowed to discuss questions of 

the Law with the Pharisaic teachers.  (38) 

· 

The culture that developed around the Israelites in ancient times did not always 

have the perspective that God created woman, “a helper comparable to him” (Gen. 2:18, 

20).  Certain Old Testament passages tend to reflect an attitude that woman was little 

more than a thing and that a woman should be entirely subordinate to man.  This 

tendency became pronounced before the coming of Christ.  One of the Jewish prayers 

that dated from that era declared, ‘I thank Thee that I am not a woman.”  (15) 


 

www.susanmcgeown.com 



2

 

Can You Fill 



In The Blanks? 

 

Answers at the 



end of the study. 

1.  The recipe for every friendship must include one basic ingredient:  __________ love.  

It is an __________ love. 

2.  Imagine the feathers Jesus ruffled by not only __________ a woman’s help, but 

__________ her as well. 

3.  Christ’s coming introduces a redemptive process designed to __________ and 

__________ women to the position they enjoyed in __________   __________.. 

 

Progression of Life Events 

Joanna’s husband, Chuza is employed by the ruling Herod of Jesus’ time, Herod Antipas, as his 

steward/business manager.  This is the same Herod who beheads John the Baptist at the request of Salome. 

Joanna and her husband enjoy social prominence as a wealthy couple within Palestine. 

Joanna may have been plagued with evil spirits or profound sickness in which Jesus heals.  Whatever the 

initial contact, Joanna has the privilege to see, meet, and hear Jesus. 

Joanna becomes a passionate believer in Jesus Christ and his ministry. 

Joanna uses her private financial wealth to support Jesus and the disciples as they travel and minister to 

others. 


Joanna travels with Jesus from village to village seeing to His and the other disciple’s needs. 

Joanna is privileged to learn from Jesus in personal, small group, and large sermon situations. 

Joanna is present at the crucifixion. 

Joanna is one of at least three women (Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of James) to arrive at the 

empty tomb and be greeted by two angels.  They are told the news, remember the word’s of Christ and 

what he had taught them, and understood the wonderful truth of Jesus’ death and resurrection. 

They are the first to tell the truth and bring this knowledge to the apostles, who believe it to be nonsense 

and do not believe them. 

 

JESUS AND WOMEN 

Follow the Fascinating Trail!! 

· 

First Person To Know That He Was Coming:  Mary (Luke 1:30-32) 

· 

First Person To Profess Faith In Him:  Elizabeth  (Luke 1:42-43) 

· 

First Person To Proclaim Him to the World:  Anna  (Luke 2:36-38) 

· 

Longest Recorded Conversation Between Jesus and a Person:  The Woman of Samaria (John 4:1-42) 

· 

 First Person That Jesus Reveals His True Identity As The Messiah To:  The Woman of Samaria (John 

4:1-42) 

· 

First Person To Anoint Christ:  The Sinful Woman (Luke 7:36-50) 

· 

First Person To Be Healed Through Touching Christ:  The Woman With The Issue of Blood (Matt 9:20-

22, Mark 5:25-34, Luke 8:43-48) 

· 

Earthly Home/Place of Rest for Jesus:  Martha of Bethany’s home  (Luke 10:38-42) 

· 

First Person to Express Knowledge/Sorrow of Jesus’ Impending Death:  Mary of Bethany (Mark 14:7-

8) 

· 

Only Person Christ Pronounced Immortal Fame Over Because Of A Specific Deed:  Mary of Bethany 

and her anointing of Christ (Mark 14:3-9) 

· 

People Who Financially Supported Jesus During His Ministry:  Joanna, the wife of Chuza, Susanna, 

“and many others”  (Luke 8:3) 

· 

Person Mentioned Most Often In Scriptures, Besides Twelve Disciples:  Mary Magdalene 



 

www.susanmcgeown.com 



3

· 

Witnesses of Christ’s Death/Present at The Crucifixion:  Mary (Mother of Jesus), Mary Magdalene, 

Salome (Zebedee’s wife and the mother of James and John), Mary (The wife of Clopas and mother of 

James the younger and Joseph), John the disciple  (John 19:25) 

· 

Only Person At Every Scene Related To Jesus’ Crucifixion and Resurrection:  Mary Magdalene 

· 

First Person The Risen Jesus Christ Appeared To and Spoke To:  Mary Magdalene  (Mark 16:9, John 

20:11-18)) 

· 

First People To Know Of The Resurrection:  Mary Magdalene, Joanna, and Mary the mother of James 

(Luke 24:1-10) 

· 

First Human Heralds of the Resurrection:  Mary Magdalene, Joanna, and Mary the mother of James 

(Luke 24:1-10) 

· 

First Person To Be Told By Christ To Herald the Resurrection:  Mary Magdalene (John 20:17) 

· 

Only Woman To Be Specifically Called a Disciple:  Dorcas  (Acts9:36-45)  

· 

Paul’s First Convert in Europe and First Member of the Church of Philippi:  Lydia  (Acts 16:6-40) 

 

Her Background, Life and Times 

Family 

Family Connections: All we know of Joanna’s history is that she was the wife Chuza, the house-steward of 

Herod the Tetrarch – whom some writers identify as the Nobleman of John 4:46-54.  Joanna was also the 

name of a male, the son Rhessa (Luke 3:27), an ancestor of Christ who lived about 50 B.C.  (2) 

Chuza, The Husband:  was the ‘steward” of Herod, which is the same word given as “tutor” (Matthew 

20:8), or “guardian” (Galatians 4:2).  Chuza must have been a man of intelligence and ability in order to 

hold the position he did as manager of Herod’s income expenditure.  Both Chuza and Joanna were likely 

among the servants to whom Herod imparted his belief, when he heard of the fame of Jesus, that it was 

John the Baptist, whom he had murdered, now risen from the dead.  (2) 

Chuza:  His name means “modest”.  Was a steward of Herod Antipas, son of Herod the Great.  (Luke 8:3)  

(2) 


Chuza:  a steward (business manager) of Herod Antipas and evidently a man of position and wealth.  (15) 

Tradition:  Tradition has it that Chuza lost his position in Herod’s palace because of his Wife’s conversion 

to Christianity and her courageous testimony among Herod’s servants.  (2) 



The Romans 

Herod:

  Herod Antipas (4 B.C.-A.D.39), one of Herod the Treat’s sons, began as tetrarch over Galilee and 

Perea.  He was the ruling Herod during Jesus’ life and ministry.  Herod Antipas was first married to the 

daughter of Aretas, an Arabian king of Petrae.  But he became infatuated with Herodias, the wife of his 

half-brother, Philip I.  The two eloped together, although both were married at the time.  This scandalous 

affair was condemned severely by John the Baptist (Matt. 14:4, Mark 6:17-18, Luke 3:19).  Although Antipas 

apparently had some respect for John the Baptist, he had John arrested and imprisoned for his 

outspokenness.  Antipas’ contacts with Jesus occurred at the same time as the ministry of John the Baptist.  

Because of Jesus’ popularity and miraculous, Antipas may have been haunted by the possibility that Jesus 

was John the Baptist come back to life.  The New Testament record shows that the relationship between 

Jesus and Antipas must have been strained.  Jesus’ popularity and teachings may have threatened Antipas 

who, according to the Pharisees, sought to kill Him (Luke 13:31).  By calling Herod a “fox” (Luke 13:32), 

Jesus showed His disapproval of his cunning and deceitful ways.  (15) 



Herod:  Built the city of Tiberias and oversaw other architectural projects, ruled the region of Galilee for the 

Romans, divorced his wife to marry the wife of his half brother, Philip, imprisoned John the Baptist and 



 

www.susanmcgeown.com 



4

later ordered his execution, had a minor part in the execution of Jesus.  (34) 



The Romans:

  It was the Romans’ custom to tolerate different beliefs.  Other religions were allowed to 

flourish throughout the empire, as long as the citizens remained loyal to the state.  By keeping their 

subjects happy in this area, the Romans were able to maintain peace.  Judaism was allowed and, at first, 

Christianity also, because it seemed to be a kind of Judaism.  However, as time passed, the Romans began 

to use emperor-worship as a test of loyalty.  Some emperors required people to worship him as “lord and 

god.”  This meant that the Christians, who would not agree to this, had to be ready to suffer for their faith.  

Persecution soon followed.  Rome’s aim was to make good Romans out of its new subjects.  They set up 

organized city governments, and brought in garrisons of soldiers and colonies of Roman citizens – in the 

name of peaceful coexistence.  The Roman Senate decided to allow Palestine as much self-rule as prudence 

permitted, so the Jews were still allowed to manage their own affairs.  (39) 



Women and Society 

Home Life:

  As Joanna was known as one of the Lord’s disciples, naturally she would speak of Him 

among Herod’s servants (Matt. 14:2), and Herod would often speak concerning the Master, for his foster 

brother, Manaen, was a teacher in the church (Acts 13:1).  The office of Chuza gave Joanna an excellent 

opportunity to witnessing in the palace.  Paul, a prisoner in Rome, persecuted by Nero, the worst ruler who 

ever lived, was able to write of the saints in Caesar’s household.  (2) 

The relative value of Women:

  In rabbinic thought men were primary; women were secondary.  The 

religious leaders, being men, looked on women as “other.”  Indeed their formulations of religious law treat 

women more as objects that men experience than as persons in their own right.  While women were 

portrayed as weak-minded and fragile, men in contrast were viewed as courageous, strong, and wise.  (32) 



Social Classes of Women in Luke’s Gospel:   

v

 



Governing Classes 

§

 



Ruling Families 

v

 



Relative Prominence 

§

 



Due to Income (Joanna was in this class) 

§

 



Due to husband’s Religious role 

v

 



Rural Poor 

v

 



Urban 

§

 



Landowners 

§

 



Artisans 

v

 



Slaves 

v

 



Unclean and Degraded 

§

 



By sickness 

§

 



By demonization 

§

 



As prostitutes 

§

 



As pagans 

v

 



Widows  (32) 

Jewish Women in First Century Palestine:  The women we meet in the Gospels lived in a strongly 

patriarchal society.  It was also a society structured by a religious faith that shaped every aspect of people’s 

lives.  Yet first-century Jewish society was not monolithic. 

Contamination by Women:  The term niddah was applied to women suffering a menstrual flow.  During 

this period women were ritually unclean, and a husband could not have sex with his wife.  Of course, any 

menstrual bloodstains on objects women came in contact with was held to pollute the objects, so Jewish 

women had to be especially careful in the kitchen and around the house.  The horror with which menstrual 

blood was viewed in rabbinic Judaism reflected and intensified the suspicion and distrust with which 


 

www.susanmcgeown.com 



5

women themselves were viewed.  (32) 



Women:  Luke is the only one who mentions that there were women in Jesus’ traveling party and that 

women provided money that helped fund His mission.  The fact is not surprising, however, as parallel exit 

in early Judaism of women given generously to support a favorite rabbi.  Note that the women mentions, 

like many others, had “their own means.”  Women in the biblical world were far more “liberated” than one 

might suspect.  (8) 

The Typical First Century Jew:

  The great majority of the population of Judea and Galilee, whether 

they lived in urban or rural settings, were relatively poor.  The men were farmers who often worked as day 

laborers to supplement their incomes.  Or they were fishermen, artisans, or shopkeepers.  By necessity 

many wives worked alongside their husbands and sold produce in the market or sold their husband’s 

products in a shop.  We meet these ordinary women most frequently in the Gospels.  Luke provides clear 

clues to the social position of most of the persons mentioned in his Gospel and in Acts.  We can identify the 

class of the women mentioned in his Gospel, most of whom are also referred to in the other Gospels.  (32)

 

· 

Heterogeneous Population:  urban and rural, some wealthy most poor, some members of religious 

elite, others despised for religious failings, divided into religious and political factions with Pharisee and 

Sadducee, Zealot and Essene, all convinced that their view of the Law’s teachings was correct.  (32) 

Þ 

Pharisee:  religious and political party known for insisting that the law of God be observed as 

the scribes interpreted it and for their special commitment to keeping the laws of tithing and ritual purity. 

(2) 

Þ 

Sadducee:  from the leading families of the nation – priests, merchants, and aristocrats.  The 



high priests and the most powerful members of the priesthood were mainly Sadducees.  Sadducees 

rejected “the tradition of the elders,” that body of oral and written commentary which interpreted the Law 

of Moses.  They insisted that only the laws that were written in the Law of Moses (the Pentateuch, the first 

five books of the Old Testament) were really binding.  (2) 

Þ 

Zealot:  like the Pharisees, Zealots were devoted to the Jewish law and religion, but unlike most 

Pharisees, they thought it was treason against God to pay tribute to the Roman emperor.  They were willing 

to fight to the death for Jewish independence.  (2) 

Þ 

Essene:  noted for their strict discipline and their isolation from others who did not observe 

their way of life.  They were known for their careful observance of the laws of Moses as they understood 

them and were stricter about keeping the Sabbath than any other Jews, even the Pharisees.  (2) 

· 

Geographically Different:  People of Jerusalem and Judea were stricter in their observance of the Law 

then the people of Galilee.  Most sages and rabbis chose to live in Jerusalem, the holy city and their 

influence was strongest there.  (32) 

· 

Wealth and religious party.  Sadducees, who controlled the temple and the high priesthood, were 

among the wealthiest in Jerusalem.  They were also the most open to Greek culture and ideals and the most 

supportive of the Roman government.  In contrast ordinary priests lived rural lives, sharing the poverty of 

the majority.  (32) 

· 

Scholarship and religious party:  In most societies status is ascribed on the basis of wealth and power, 

but in the Jerusalem of Jesus’ time a transition was already taking place.  The piety of the Pharisees made a 

great impression on the general population, and the rabbis and sages associated with the Pharisee party 

were viewed as “the” religious authorities.  The Sadducees, much to their dismay, were even forced to 

adopt the rulings of the Pharisees concerning temple functions.  Increasingly in Judaism status was a 

matter of scholarship of the Law, rather than a matter of wealth.  (32) 

Joanna’s Illness 

Demons:  The belief in demons was common in ancient cultures, but seldom mentioned in the O.T.  (Only 

Deuteronomy 32:17, Psalm 106:36,37).  However, demons are spoken of often in the N.T., and the Gospels 



 

www.susanmcgeown.com 



6

are filled with references to these evil spirits.  It may well be that Jesus’ presence stimulated an unusual 

outburst of demonic activity, as Satan marshaled his forces to resist the Lord.  In the Gospels the hostile 

intent of demons, who must likely are the fallen angels mentioned in both Testaments.  Their antagonism 

toward human beings is shown in their oppression or possession persons.  Thus the N.T. portrays demons 

as living, malignant, conscious individual beings, subordinate to Satan and active in their allegiance to his 

kingdom.  They will also share the fate of Satan, which is an eternity in what the Bible calls the “lake of 

fire” (Revelations 20:14).  (8) 



Healing:   For most minor illnesses, ancient people depended on family members or neighbors who had 

some skill in the healing arts.  A more sever illness would be treated by a priest who also acted as a 

physician.  Since most disease was thought to be caused by spirits or demons, priest-physicians were 

appropriate healers.  Medical practiced focused heavily on spiritual remedies.  Most near Easter people 

though disease-causing spirits entered through the openings in the head.  Some Egyptian physicians went 

so far as to drill holes in the patient’s head in order to give the demons a means of escape.  Joanna is listed 

with several other women whom Jesus had “cured of evil spirits and diseases.”   Scripture doesn’t say 

exactly what her particular ailment was, but obviously it was something significant, something from which 

she had been unable to find relief through conventional methods.  She and the other healed women now 

followed Jesus and supported him and his disciples.  (1) 



Jesus and His Attitude Toward Women 

Jesus and Women:

  Jesus’ contact with the women in Luke’s Gospel invariable lifted them.  Jesus saw in 

these women a significance that they were denied in their society!  Without contesting the patriarchal 

structure of first-century society, Jesus interacted with women in ways that challenged contemporary views 

of women.  Jesus’ coming initiated a transformation of attitudes toward women which, we will see, 

continued on into the church age.  Jesus’ actions, when contrasted with the dictums of the rabbis, makes it 

clear that Christ’s coming introduces a redemptive process designed to lift and restore women to the position they 

enjoyed in original creation.  (32) 

Implications of Gospel Stories about Women:  The stores we read in the Gospels are so familiar that we 

tend to miss their significance.  Yet these incidents highlighted above and many others depicting Jesus’ 

interaction with women are truly revolutionary.  They directly challenge the view of women held in the 

first century.  And they powerfully affirm women who were restricted or held down on the basis of 

religious ideas that Jesus, by His example, decisively rejected.  Jesus’ interactions with women affirmed the 

worth and value of women as persons, overturned stereotypes, and opened the door to new and fulfilling 

roles for women of faith.  Before we follow the example of the religionists of Jesus’ day, and deny 

significant roles to women today, we must seriously reconsider the liberation of women that the coming of 

Jesus clearly introduced.  (32) 

Jesus and Women:  Jesus lifted women up from the agony of degradation and servitude to the joy of 

fellowship and service.  In Jewish culture, women were not supposed to learn from rabbis.  By allowing 

these women to travel with him, Jesus was showing that all people are equal under God.  These women 

supported Jesus’ ministry with their own money.  They owed a great debt to him because he had driven 

demons out of some and had healed others.  (34) 

Women as Followers and Disciples:  It was not unusual for women of means to make contributions 

towards the support of Rabbis.  Luke 20:47 shows that this facet was sometimes taken advantage of by 

certain of the scribes.  However, the Rabbis in general preferred to avoid as much as possible the company 

of even such women as these.  The attitude of Jesus on the other hand, “encouraged many women to take 

this very unusual step of following him and ministering to him’.  The gospels point out that for a great part 

of the ministry of Jesus he was accompanied not only by the twelve apostles but also by several women, 

whose gratitude to him and love, led them to follow him.  It is almost impossible from the information 


 

www.susanmcgeown.com 



7

given in the gospels to assess accurately when Jesus is teaching the twelve and when he is addressing the 

wider group of disciples.  It is apparent that at times he is alone with the three, at other times alone with 

the twelve, and that on some occasions at least seventy accompanied him.  However, Luke 8:1-2 in 

particular makes it clear that on many occasions when only the twelve are mentioned, the women must 

have been there as well.  These women following Jesus were not ‘passive spectators, they rendered service 

from their possessions’.  It is not clear exactly what for this service took, although obviously financial 

provision is included.  Beyer tells us that the word diakonein “to serve”, ‘has the special quality of indicating 

very personally the service rendered to another’.  Matthew 25:42-44 shows that serving includes many 

different activities, such as providing hospitality or visiting those in need. ‘The term thus comes to have 

the full sense of active Christian love for the neighbor and as such it is the mark of true discipleship of 

Jesus.’  It is likely that as well as paying for food the women prepared and served it, particularly as the 

original meaning of diakonein was ‘to wait at table’.  That the women also shared with the rest of the 

disciples in other activities such as their teaching sessions is indicated by such verses as Luke 10:39 and 

John 11:28.  (36) 

Women Who Ministered With Jesus:  Luke alone supplies the datum that there were many women who 

not only benefited personally from Jesus’ ministry but who ministered to him and with him, even to 

accompanying him and the Twelve on evangelistic journeys Luke 8:1-3).  (37) 

Jesus and Women:  Luke 8:1-3 consists of only one long sentence in the Greek text.  The chief motive of the 

paragraph seems to be to bring certain women, of whom there were “many,” into focus, representing them 

as recipients of healing at different levels of need and as actively participating with Jesus and the Twelve in 

their crusades, with special reference to their monetary support.  Three women are named, “Joanna” and 

“Susanna” in addition to Mary Magdalene.  It is significant that women did have an open and prominent 

part in the ministry of Jesus.  Luke’s word for their “ministering” is widely used in the New Testament.  Its 

noun cognate, diakonos, may be rendered “minister,” servant,” or “deacon” (the latter in Romans 16:1 for 

Phoebe and in the pastoral letters).  The passage before us implies that Jesus attracted to his movement a 

large number of women, ranging from some in desperate need to some in official circles of government.  

(37) 


Women Witnesses to Christ’s resurrection: 

 Luke 24 

· 

“They came to the tomb” Luke 24:1 The women came to the tomb that morning to bind spices in the 



lien cloths in which Jesus’ body was wrapped.  In the first century this was “women’s work.”  What is 

significant is that in doing their women’s work, God opened the door to a unique and wonderful privilege. 

· 

“Remember how He spoke to you when He was still in Galilee”  (Luke 24:6)  The angels in reminding 



the women of Jesus’ words made it clear that these women were disciples who had been taught by Christ – 

just as the Twelve had been!  Jesus had taught the women the same truths He taught the men.  Their 

gender, and even their willingness to do “women’s work,” in no way limited their status as Christ’s 

disciples! 

· 

“And they remembered His Words” Luke 24:8 As the angels spoke the women remembered what Jesus 



had taught.  The implication was that they suddenly understood both the meaning of the cross and the 

grand miracle of Jesus’ resurrection.  Here Luke contrasts the insight of the women with the confusion of 

the male disciples.  When the same message was conveyed to the Eleven, “their words seemed to them like 

idle tales, and they did not believe them”  (Luke 24:11)!  The women who had chosen to follow Jesus were 

more perceptive spiritually than the male disciples Christ Himself had chosen! 

· 

“Then they returned…and told all these things o the eleven and to all the rest” Luke 24:9 Today we 



might miss the significance of this verse.  But in first-century Judaism, while there were exceptions, the 

testimony of women was not considered valid.  Women served as the first witnesses to Jesus’ resurrection.  

IN fact Matthew’s account emphasizes the fact that they were God’s chosen witnesses, for the angels tell the 

women, “Go quickly and tell His disciples that He is risen from the dead”  (Matt. 28:7)!  (32) 



 

www.susanmcgeown.com 



8

The Only Men Thing:

  The restriction of the Twelve to male Jews is not to be dismissed as necessarily 

without male bias.  The explanation nearest at hand is that Jesus began where he was, within the structures 

of Judaism as he knew it in his upbringing.  His closest companions initially may have been Jews, men, and 

men of about his own age.  He began there but he did not stop there.  The thrust was outward, increasingly 

inclusive and not restrictive.  Even in the early stages of his mission, women were becoming deeply 

involved at the power of center of Jesus’ movement.  As a concluding caveat, the logic which from the 

male composition of the Twelve would exclude women from high office or role in the church would 

likewise exclude the writers and most of the readers of this book, for there were no non-Jews among the 

Twelve.  Unless one would argue that “apostolic succession” (however adapted) is for Jews only, it cannot 

be for men only.  (37) 

 

Her Character 

Healed 

Healed by Christ:  A woman of high rank in Herod’s court, she experienced healing at Jesus’ hands.  She 

responded by giving herself totally, supporting his ministry and following him wherever he went.  The 

story of her healing may have been known to Herod himself.  (1) 

Disciple and Witness 

Devoted Disciple:  As we read between the lines in the short account Luke gives us in his sacred narrative 

of the female Joanna, we see her a devoted disciple of the One to whom she owed so much.  (2) 



Loyal Witness:  As Joanna was known as one of the Lord’s disciples, naturally she would speak of Him 

among Herod’s servants (Matthew 14:2), and Herod would often speak concerning the Master, for his 

foster brother, Manaen, was a teacher in the church (Acts 13:1).  The office of Chuza gave Joanna an 

excellent opportunity of witnessing in the palace, and we can imagine how she took full advantage of it.  (2) 



Witness:  One of the women who witnessed the empty tomb and announced Christ’s resurrection to the 

unbelieving apostles (Luke 24:1-10).  (15) 



Loyal Follower:  She was among the number of consecrated women who followed Jesus from Galilee and 

who, after His brutal death, prepared spices and ointments for His body (Luke 23:55, 56).  (2) 



Loyal:  One of that loyal group of women who were followers of Jesus, Joanna was the wife of Chuza, 

Herod Antipas’ superintendent of royal properties.  Healed by Jesus gratefully supplied Jesus and the 

Twelve with money for their needs, and went to Jerusalem with the group that accompanied Jesus on His 

last journey.  Joanna was with the pathetic handful of woman that went to the tomb to embalm Jesus’ body 

and, instead, were surprised by the unexpected news of the resurrection.  (35) 

Joyful Herald:  Joanna was among the sorrow-stricken women who early on that first memorable Lord’s 

Day gathered at the sepulcher to linger in the presence of the dead.  But to their amazement the tomb was 

empty, for the Living Lord was no longer among the dead.  Perplexed over the vacant grave, the beheld the 

angelic guardians and heard them say, “he is not here, but is risen:  remember how he spake unto you 

when he was yet in Galilee.”  Recalling all He had said of His sufferings, death and Resurrection, Mary 

Magdalene, Joanna, and Mary the mother of James, became the first human heralds of the Resurrection. (2) 



Provider 

Generous:  It is evident that this female of the upper class, restored to normal health by Christ, gave her 

life to Him.  She is here seen as one of the traveling company who went before Christ and the Twelve to 

arrange for their hospitable reception.  Out of her own resources many expenses were met, and in this way 

she ministered unto Him of her substance.  Having feely received His healing touch, she freely gave of 

herself and of her means for His welfare.  By “substance” we are to understand material possessions, such 


 

www.susanmcgeown.com 



9

as money and property, and Joanna honored the Lord with these. (2) 



Generous:  Luke along specifies that they ministered to Jesus and the Twelve “out of their possessions: 

(Luke 8:3).  They helped finance the mission of Jesus and the Twelve, but this does not imply that their 

ministry was limited to this.  (37) 

Provider:  Along with Mary Magdalene, Susanna, and others, she provided for the material needs of Jesus 

and His disciples from her own funds (Luke 8:3).  (15) 



Mourner 

Mourner:  Among the women at the cross, the heart of Joanna must have been rent with anguish as she 

saw her beloved Lord dying in agony and shame.  Was she not among the number of the consecrated 

women who had followed Him from Galilee, and who, after His brutal death, prepared spices and 

ointments for His body (Luke 23:55,56).  (2) 



Courageous 

Brave:  In the early days of Christianity, persecution ran rampant (2 Cor. 4:9).  The Romans had taken to 

crucifying them, using them for torches in their gardens, and throwing them into the battle dome to face 

gladiators and wild beasts.  The early Christians refused to stop meeting together, but found it prudent to 

keep their activities a secret.  They used secret codes and symbols to mark rendezvous points.  If the 

symbol was carved into their doorpost or worked into the patter of their floor tiles, other Christians 

recognized that they were in the presence of a brother or sister.  Some of the most popular symbols were 

the cross, the anchor, the crown of thorns, and the fish.  The Greek word for fish was icthus, and the letters 

provided an acrostic of thief faith, meaning “Jesus Christ, Son of God, Savior.”  (39) 

 

Her Sorrow 

Illness 

Sick:  Joanna, along with Mary Magdalene and Susanna were among the “certain women who had been 

healed of evil spirits and infirmities” (Luke 8:2).  Whether Joanna had been demon-possess or suffered 

from some mental or physical disability we are not told.  It is evident that this female of the upper class, 

restored to normal healthy by Christ, gave her life to Him.  (2) 



The Crucifixion 

Mourner:  Among the women at the cross, the heart of Joanna must have been rent with anguish as she 

saw her beloved Lord dying in agony and shame.  (2) 



Witness to the crucifixion:  Crucifixion was the ultimate in corporal punishment.  When the judge wanted 

a criminal to truly suffer for his crimes, he was sentenced to crucifixion.  A criminal’s hands and feet were 

pinned to rough beams of wood with long spikes.  Nine-inch spikes were embedded in their anklebones.  

With arms outstretched, breathing became difficult, and a man had to push up on the spike in his feet to 

draw a breath.  To hasten death, a criminal’s legs were broken, so that he could not catch a breath.  (39) 

 

Her Joy 



Healed 

Healed:  Along with Mary Magdalene and Susanna, they were the “certain women who had been healed of 

evil spirits and infirmities” (Luke 8:2).  Whether she had been demon-possessed or suffered from some 

mental or physical disability we are not told.  (2) 


10 

 

www.susanmcgeown.com 



10

The Resurrection  

Christ’s Resurrection:  To find the tomb empty except for the angels who proclaimed Jesus alive.  It didn’t 

matter that her husband served a man who had humiliated Christ; Joanna knew where her allegiance 

belonged. A woman of high rank, she became part of the intimate circle of Christ’s followers, casting her 

lot with fishermen and poor people rather than with the rich and the powerful.  God honored her by 

making her one of the first witnesses of the Resurrection. (1) 

Christ’s Resurrection:  Joanna was among the sorrow-stricken women who early on that first memorable 

Lord’s Day gathered at the sepulcher to linger in the presence of the dead.  Recalling all He had said of His 

sufferings, death and Resurrection, Mary Magdalene, Joanna, and Mary the mother of James, became the 

first human heralds of the Resurrection.  With all haste they went to the apostles and told them the good 

news.  (2) 

 

Her Promises, Her Lessons, Her Legacy 



Sorrow and Joy 

Joy:  Joy comes in the morning.  Joanna discovered this in a miraculous way on Jesus’ resurrection day.  

She went to his tomb expecting to minister to his dead body and to grieve.  Instead, her sorrow turned to 

tremendous joy.  Our joy may not come this morning or tomorrow morning or even the morning after that.  

We face too many hardships, too many difficult situations, too much sorrow here on earth to think joy will 

arrive with each morning.  But it will come.  He’s promised.  At the end of the day, at then end of this life, 

there will be a joyful morning for all who trust in him.  (1) 



Women’s Roles 

Women Friends of Christ:  The love and practical assistance that these women (Joanna, Mary Magdalene, 

and Susanna) offered freely to the Lord certainly mark them as women of character.  But Christ’s 

willingness to receive help from them – especially when seen against the background of the times – reveals 

the depths of His love and the uniqueness of His ministry.  A rabbi of that day was supposed to distance 

himself from women, not even allowed to speak to his own wife in public.  Imagine the feathers Jesus 

ruffled by not only accepting a woman’s help, but befriending her as well.  (4) 



Friendship 

Agape Love:  The recipe for every friendship must include one basic ingredient:  agape love.  It is an 

unconditional love.  It is not based upon performance; it is given in spite of how the other person behaves.  



Agape love is also transparent love.  It is strong enough to allow another person to know the real you. Love 

means to commit yourself without guarantee, to give yourself completely in the hope that your love will 

produce love in the other person.  Love is an act of faith, and whoever is of little faith is also of little love.  

Perfect love would be one that gives all and expects nothing.  It would, of course, be willing and delighted 

to take anything that was offered, asking nothing in return.  The person who expects nothing and asks 

nothing can never be deceived or disappointed.  Agape love is unique in that it causes us to seek to meet the 

needs of the other rather than demanding that our own be met.  Our irritability and frustration diminish 

when we love another person because we are seeking to fulfill rather than be fulfilled.  This is what agape is 

all about.  (Norman Wright) (4) 

Generosity 

Principles for Giving:   

1.   Freely “Freely you have received, freely give.” (Matthew 10:8)  



11 

 

www.susanmcgeown.com 



11

2.  Bountifully “He who sows bountifully will also reap bountifully” (2 Corinthians 9:6) 

3.  Cheerfully “Let each one give as he purposes in his heart, not grudgingly or of necessity; for God loves a 

cheerful giver” (2 Corinthians 9:7)  (7) 

 

Answers: 

1.  agape, unconditional 

2.  accepting, befriending 

3.  lift, restore, original creation 

 


12 

 

www.susanmcgeown.com 



12

 

Bibliography 



Please note that NO information contained in this study is original work of Susan McGeown, unless 

otherwise noted. 

Source 1.  Women of the Bible:  A One-Year Devotional Study of Women in Scripture By Ann Spangler & Jean E. Syswerda, Zondervan 

Publishing House, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1999, ISBN: 0-310-22352-0 



Source 2.  All the Women of the Bible by Herbert Lockyer, Zondervan Publishing House, Michigan, ISBN 0-310-28151-2 

Source 3.  she shall be called Woman by Frances Vander Velde, Kegel Publications, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1957, ISBN:0-8254-4003-3 

Source 4.  Women of Character Broadman & Holman Publishers, Nashville, Tennessee, 1998 ISBN: 0-8054-9277-1) 

Source 5.  Great Women of the Bible by Clarence Edward Macartney, Baker Book House, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1942,  ISBN:  0-8010-

5901-5 



Source 6.  Bad Girls of the Bible and What We can Learn From Them By Liz Curtis Higgs, Waterbrook Press, Colorado Springs, Colorado, 

1999, ISBN: I-57856-125-6 



Source 7:  Women Who Loved God By Elizabeth George, Harvest House Publishers, Eugene, Oregon, 1999, ISBN: 1-56507-850-0 

Source 8:  The Bible Reader’s Companion By Lawrence O. Richards, Chariot Victor Publishing, Wheaton Illinois, 1991, ISBN:  0-89693-039-4 

Source 9:  Man and Woman in Biblical Perspective by James B. Hurley,  Academie Books, Zondervan Publishing House, Grand Rapids 

Michigan, 1981, ISBN: 0-310-42731-2 



Source 10:  Manners and Customs of the Bible, By James M. Freeman, Whitaker House, New Kensington, PA, 1996, ISBN: 0-88368-290-7 

Source 11:  Archaeology and Bible History,  By Joseph P. Free, Zondervan Publishing House, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1992, ISBN: 0-310-

47961-4 



Source 12:  30 Days to Understanding The Bible By Max Anders, Word Publishing, Dallas, 1994, ISBN:  0-8499-3489-3 

Source 13:  Illustrated Dictionary of Bible Life and Times, Barbara J. Morgan, EditorReader’s Digest, The Reader’s Digest Association, Inc. 

Pleasantville, NY, 1997, 0-89577-987-0 



Source 14:  Women in Leadership By Bob Briner with Lawrence Kimbrough, Holman Reference, Nashville, Tennessee, 1999, ISBN: 0-8054-

9193-7 



Source 15:  Illustrated Dictionary of the BibleBy Herbert Lockyer, Sr., Editor, Thomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, 1986, ISBN: 0-7852-

1230-2 



Source 16:  Holman Bible Atlas Holman Reference, Nashville, Tennessee, 1998, ISBN: 1-55819-709-5 

Source 17:  Women of the New Testamentby Abraham Kuyper, Zondervan Publishing House, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1934 

Source 18:  Really Bad Girls of the BibleBy Liz Curtis Higgs, Waterbrook Press, Colorado Springs, 2000, ISBN:  1-57856-394-1 

Source 19:  Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Manners & CustomsBy Howard F. Vos, Thomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, 1999, ISBN: 0-

7852-1194-2 



Source 20:  Warrior Dancer Seductress Queen, By Susan Ackerman, Doubleday, New York, 1998, ISBN 0-385-48424-0  SCL:  222ACK 

Source 21: Atlas of Ancient ArchaeologyJacquetta Hawkes, McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, 1974, ISBN: 0-07-027293-X.  SCL: Q 

921.1 H 



Source 22: Battles of the BibleBy Chaim Herzog and Moedechai Gichon, Random House, New York, 1978, ISBN: 394-50131-4  SCL:  

220.95 H 



Source 23:  Everyday Life in Bible Times:  By Arthur W. Klinck and Erich H. Kiehl, Concordia Publishing House, St. Louis, MO, 1995, ISBN: 

0-570-01543-X 



Source 24:  Discovering the Biblical World By Harry Thomas Frank, Harper & Row, Publishers, New York, Hammond Inc., Maplewood, 

New Jersey, 1975, ISBN:  0-06-063014-0  SCL:  Q220.95 F 



Source 25:  Oxford Bible Atlas, Edited by Herbert G. May, Oxford University Press, New York, 1974, ISBN: 0-19-211556  SCL:  220.0 May 

Source 26:  The Thompson Chain-Reference Bible, NAS, Frank Charles Thompson, D.D., Ph.D., B.B. Kirkbride Bible Co., Inc. Indianapolis, 

In, 1993, ISBN:   



Source 27:  Social World of Ancient Israel 1250-587 BCE, By Victor H. Matthews and Don C. Benjamin, Henrickson Publishers, Peabody, 

Massachusetss, 1993, ISBN:  0-913573-89-2 



Source 28:  Peoples of the Old Testament World, Edited by Alfred J. Hoerth, Gerald L. Mattingly, Edwin M. Yamauchi, The Lutterworth 

Press, Cambridge, Baker Books, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1994, ISBN:  0-7188-2988 3 



Source 29: The Archaeology of Ancient IsraelEdited by Amnon Ben-Tor, Yale University Press, The Open University of Israel, New Haven 

and London, 1992, ISBN:  0-300-04768-1  SCL  933 ARC 



Source 30:  Women in Leadership,  By Bob Briner and Lawrence Kimbrough, Holman Reference, Nashville, Tennessee, 1999, ISBN:  0-8054-

9193-7 



Source 31.  Matthew Henry’s Commentary of the Whole Bible,  By Matthew Henry, Sovereign Grace Publishers, Wilmington, DE, 1972,  

Source 32:  Every Woman in the Bible, By Sue and Larry Richards, Thomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, TN,  1999 

Source 33:  Every Miracle in the Bible, By Larry Richards, Thomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, TN,  1998 

13 

 

www.susanmcgeown.com 



13

Source 34:  Life Application Study BibleBy Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Wheaton, Illinois, 1996, ISBN #0-8423-3267-7 

Source 35: Everyone In The Bible,  By William P. Barker, , Fleming H. Revell Co., Old Tappan, NJ,  1966 

Source 36:  Women in the Bible, By. Mary J. Evans, InterVarsity Press, Downers Grove, ILL, 1983, ISBN 0-87784-978-1 

Source 37:  Women in the World of Jesus, By Evelyn & Frank Stagg, The Westminster Press, Philadelphia, 1978, ISBN 0-664-24195-6 

Source 38:  Illustrated Manners and Customs of the Bible, By J. I. Packer, M.C. Tenney, Editors, Thomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, 1980, 

ISBN 0-7852-1231-0 



Source 39:  How People Lived In The Bible,  Thomas Nelson Publishers,  Nashville, 2002, ISBN 0-7852-4256-2 

  

 




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling