Jonathan Swift (30 November 1667 – 19 October 1745) was an Anglo-Irish satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for the Whigs, then for the Tories), poet and cleric who became Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin. Jonathan Swift


Download 484 b.
Sana23.11.2017
Hajmi484 b.



The era covers the period from 1714 to 1830. It was a time of immense social change in Britain, with the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution which began the process of intensifying class divisions, and the emergence of rival political parties like the Whigs and Tories.

  • The era covers the period from 1714 to 1830. It was a time of immense social change in Britain, with the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution which began the process of intensifying class divisions, and the emergence of rival political parties like the Whigs and Tories.



Jonathan Swift (30 November 1667 – 19 October 1745) was an Anglo-Irish satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for the Whigs, then for the Tories), poet and cleric who became Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin.

  • Jonathan Swift (30 November 1667 – 19 October 1745) was an Anglo-Irish satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for the Whigs, then for the Tories), poet and cleric who became Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin.



Swift was a prolific writer, notable for his satires. He originally published all of his works under pseudonyms – such as Lemuel Gulliver, Isaac BickerstaffDrapier's Letters as MB Drapier – or anonymously. He is also known for being a master of two styles of satire, the Horatian and Juvenalian styles. Swift's first major prose workA Tale of a Tub, demonstrates many of the themes and stylistic techniques he would employ in his later work. In February 1702, Swift received his Doctor of Divinity degree from Trinity College, Dublin.

  • Swift was a prolific writer, notable for his satires. He originally published all of his works under pseudonyms – such as Lemuel Gulliver, Isaac Bickerstaff, Drapier's Letters as MB Drapier – or anonymously. He is also known for being a master of two styles of satire, the Horatian and Juvenalian styles. Swift's first major prose work, A Tale of a Tub, demonstrates many of the themes and stylistic techniques he would employ in his later work. In February 1702, Swift received his Doctor of Divinity degree from Trinity College, Dublin.



Gulliver’s Travels recounts the story of Lemuel Gulliver, a practical-minded Englishman trained as a surgeon who takes to the seas when his business fails. In a deadpan first-person narrative that rarely shows any signs of self-reflection or deep emotional response, Gulliver narrates the adventures that befall him on these travels.

  • Gulliver’s Travels recounts the story of Lemuel Gulliver, a practical-minded Englishman trained as a surgeon who takes to the seas when his business fails. In a deadpan first-person narrative that rarely shows any signs of self-reflection or deep emotional response, Gulliver narrates the adventures that befall him on these travels.



FULL TITLE  ·  Gulliver’s Travels, or, Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, by Lemuel Gulliver

  • FULL TITLE  ·  Gulliver’s Travels, or, Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, by Lemuel Gulliver

  • AUTHOR  · Jonathan Swift

  • TYPE OF WORK  · Novel

  • GENRE  · Satire

  • LANGUAGE  · English

  • TIME AND PLACE WRITTEN  · Approximately 1712–1726, London and Dublin

  • DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION  · 1726

  • PUBLISHER  · George Faulkner

  • NARRATOR  · Lemuel Gulliver

  • POINT OF VIEW  · Gulliver speaks in the first person. He describes other characters and actions as they appear to him.

  • TONE  · Gulliver’s tone is gullible and naïve during the first three voyages; in the fourth, it turns cynical and bitter. The intention of the author, Jonathan Swift, is satirical and biting throughout.

  • TENSE  · Past

  • SETTING (TIME)  · Early eighteenth century

  • SETTING (PLACE)  · Primarily England and the imaginary countries of Lilliput, Blefuscu, Brobdingnag, Laputa, and the land of the Houyhnhnms



PROTAGONIST  · Lemuel Gulliver

  • PROTAGONIST  · Lemuel Gulliver

  • MAJOR CONFLICT  · On the surface, Gulliver strives to understand the various societies with which he comes into contact and to have these societies understand his native England. Below the surface, Swift is engaged in a conflict with the English society he is satirizing.

  • RISING ACTION  · Gulliver’s encounters with other societies eventually lead up to his rejection of human society in the fourth voyage

  • CLIMAX · Gulliver rejects human society in the fourth voyage, specifically when he shuns the generous Don Pedro as a vulgar Yahoo

  • FALLING ACTION  · Gulliver’s unhappy return to England accentuates his alienation and compels him to buy horses, which remind him of Houyhnhnms, to keep him company

  • THEMES  · Might versus right; the individual versus society; the limits of human understanding

  • MOTIFS  · Excrement; foreign languages; clothing

  • SYMBOLS  · Lilliputians; Brobdingnagians; Laputans; Houyhnhnms; England

  • FORESHADOWING  · Gulliver’s experiences with various flawed societies foreshadow his ultimate rejection of human society in the fourth voyage.



The Individual Versus Society

  • The Individual Versus Society

  • Like many narratives about voyages to nonexistent lands, Gulliver’s Travels explores the idea of utopia—an imaginary model of the ideal community.



Lilliputians

  • Lilliputians

  • The Lilliputians symbolize humankind’s wildly excessive pride in its own puny existence. Swift fully intends the irony of representing the tiniest race visited by Gulliver as by far the most vainglorious and smug, both collectively and individually. There is surely no character more odious in all of Gulliver’s travels than the noxious Skyresh. Gulliver is a naïve consumer of the Lilliputians’ grandiose imaginings: he is flattered by the attention of their royal family and cowed by their threats of punishment, forgetting that they have no real physical power over him. 



England

  • England

  • As the site of his father’s disappointingly “small estate” and Gulliver’s failing business, England seems to symbolize deficiency or insufficiency, at least in the financial sense that matters most to Gulliver. England is passed over very quickly in the first paragraph of Chapter I, as if to show that it is simply there as the starting point to be left quickly behind. Gulliver seems to have very few nationalistic or patriotic feelings about England, and he rarely mentions his homeland on his travels.



Gulliver's Travels has been the recipient of several designations: from Menippean satire to a children's story, from proto-Science Fiction to a forerunner of the modern novel.

  • Gulliver's Travels has been the recipient of several designations: from Menippean satire to a children's story, from proto-Science Fiction to a forerunner of the modern novel.



Gulliver -  The narrator and protagonist of the story. Although Lemuel Gulliver’s vivid and detailed style of narration makes it clear that he is intelligent and well educated, his perceptions are naïve and gullible. He has virtually no emotional life, or at least no awareness of it, and his comments are strictly factual. Gulliver never thinks that the absurdities he encounters are funny and never makes the satiric connections between the lands he visits and his own home. Gulliver’s naïveté makes the satire possible, as we pick up on things that Gulliver does not notice.

  • Gulliver -  The narrator and protagonist of the story. Although Lemuel Gulliver’s vivid and detailed style of narration makes it clear that he is intelligent and well educated, his perceptions are naïve and gullible. He has virtually no emotional life, or at least no awareness of it, and his comments are strictly factual. Gulliver never thinks that the absurdities he encounters are funny and never makes the satiric connections between the lands he visits and his own home. Gulliver’s naïveté makes the satire possible, as we pick up on things that Gulliver does not notice.



Glumdalclitch -  The farmer’s nine-year-old daughter, who is forty feet tall. Glumdalclitch becomes Gulliver’s friend and nursemaid, hanging him to sleep safely in her closet at night and teaching him the Brobdingnagian language by day. She is skilled at sewing and makes Gulliver several sets of new clothes, taking delight in dressing him. To Glumdalclitch, Gulliver is basically a living doll, symbolizing the general status Gulliver has in Brobdingnag.

  • Glumdalclitch -  The farmer’s nine-year-old daughter, who is forty feet tall. Glumdalclitch becomes Gulliver’s friend and nursemaid, hanging him to sleep safely in her closet at night and teaching him the Brobdingnagian language by day. She is skilled at sewing and makes Gulliver several sets of new clothes, taking delight in dressing him. To Glumdalclitch, Gulliver is basically a living doll, symbolizing the general status Gulliver has in Brobdingnag.





1. How does Gulliver end up stranded in Lilliput?

  • 1. How does Gulliver end up stranded in Lilliput?

  • (A) He survives a shipwreck

  • (B) His crew abandons him

  • (C) He is dropped there by an enormous eagle

  • (D) He stops there for provisions and is trapped while he sleeps



5.What is the line of doctrine over which the Blefuscudians and Lilliputians differ?

  • 5.What is the line of doctrine over which the Blefuscudians and Lilliputians differ?

  • (A) “All true believers shall break their eggs at the small end.”

  • (B) “All true believers shall break their eggs at the big end.”

  • (C) “All true believers shall break their eggs as they see fit.”

  • (D) “All true believers shall break their eggs at the convenient end.”



10.Who is Gulliver’s main enemy in the royal court of Brobdingnag?

  • 10.Who is Gulliver’s main enemy in the royal court of Brobdingnag?

  • (A) The dwarf

  • (B) The king

  • (C) The queen

  • (D) Reldresal






Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling