Kaunas: The Founding Legend


Download 19.49 Kb.

Sana06.12.2017
Hajmi19.49 Kb.

 

 

 



 

 

Kaunas: The Founding Legend  

According to an old legend, the city of Kaunas – the second largest in Lithuania – was founded by the Romans. As 

the  story  goes,  a  Roman  patrician  by  the  name  of  Palemon  fled  Ancient  Rome  fearing  the  murderous  hand  of 

Emperor Nero. He took his three sons with him – Barcus, Kunas, and Sperus – and travelled all the way up north 

until  he  reached  the  tribal  lands  that  later  became  Lithuania.  After  Palemon’s  death,  his  sons  divided  the  land 

among themselves. Kunas got the land where Kaunas now stands and built a fortress where the rivers Nemunas 

and  Neris  meet.  The  city  that 

grew around the area was thus 

named  after  him.  The  legend 

also  claims  that  the  present 

suburb of Palemonas bears the 

name  of  the  Roman  who  had 

reached  these  faraway  lands 

many centuries ago.  

Kaunas Today 

Welcome to Kaunas, the city that has best preserved the old-school Lithuanian national character!  

Feast here! Kaunas is home to a variety of festivals and events, including the famous Kaunas Jazz festival, Hanza 

days, Operetta, Pažaislis Classical Music festival, Bike show, Kaunas city days, Songs festival (listed by UNESCO), 

International Modern Dance Festival and much more. 

Kaunas  is  also  known  as  a  city  of  students.  Universities  in  Kaunas  are  among  the  country’s  top  universities, 

offering high quality yet inexpensive courses and degrees.  

Make  a  wish!  The  beautiful  confluence  of  Lithuania’s  two  largest  rivers  is  known  for  its  magical  powers  on 

couples: the rivers meet in Kaunas and run the rest of their course together, never ever breaking apart. If you are 

after beautiful scenery with a romantic note, this is the right place.  

Visit!  The  remarkable  Old  Town  is  a  collection  of  ancient  architectural  monuments:  the  remnants  of  the  14th 

century  with  the  remains  of  the  Kaunas  Castle;  as  well  as  Gothic  Middle  Ages  buildings  and  Art  Déco-style 

beauties.  Stroll  down  the  city’s  most  famous  Freedom  Avenue  (Laisvės  Alėja);  its  entire  2  km  length  has  been 

completely  transformed  to  the  benefit  of 

pedestrians.  From  the Old  Town  it  reaches  the 

Church  of  St.  Michael  the  Archangel,  with 

linden trees and benches lining it in the middle. 

The Kaunas Fortress is part of the city’s military 

heritage; there are nine forts spread around the 

city; the Ninth Fort serves as a museum. Unique 

in  the  world,  the  Devils  Museum  houses  a 

macabre  collection  of  some  3,000  devils  of  all 

sorts.  Visitors  also  marvel  at  the  exhibitions  showing  the  unique  artistic  styles  of  composer  and  painter  M.  K. 

Ciurlionis and Jurgis Maciunas, one of the initiators of the avant-garde artistic Fluxus movement.  

For the real Lithuanian spirit, visit and discover Kaunas! 


 

 

 



 

 

Main Historical Facts 

1361: Kaunas first mentioned by chroniclers 

1408: Lithuanian Duke Vytautas the Great grants the town Magdeburg rights; Kaunas expands rapidly as the main 

trade port in the area.  

16th century: Kaunas establishes its first school, first public hospital, and its first chemist’s. It becomes one of the 

most advanced cities in the Lithuanian Kingdom.  

1655: Russian army attacks Kaunas; two plagues damage  the  city in 1657 and then again in 1708; colossal fires 

burn entire neighbourhoods to the ground in 1731 and 1732. Kaunas enters a long period of decline.  

1812: Napoleon’s army crosses the Nemunas River in Kaunas on their way to Russia. 

1862: Kaunas experiences several major developments that help it back onto the path of prosperity and growth. 

Among them – the opening of the Oginsky Canal connecting the Nemunas and Dnieper rivers and a railway line 

connecting the Russian Empire with Germany.  

1898: Opening of the first power plant. 

1918:  After  decades  of  Tsarist  Russia’s  occupation,  Lithuania  becomes  an  independent  state.  However,  Poland 

occupies  the  capital  city  of  Vilnius  and  thus  Kaunas  becomes  a  de  facto  capital,  always  referred  to  as  the 

“temporary  capital”.  This  was  the  golden  era  for  Kaunas.  In  just  two  decades  the  city  is  transformed  from  a 

provincial outpost into a modern city; population increases by 66% (92,000 to 153,000) as the highly agricultural 

Lithuania becomes urbanised.  

1940: Soviet Russia occupies Kaunas; the city’s intellectual,  political, and cultural elite suffer heavy repressions. 

Tens  of  thousands  are  either  killed  or  exiled  to  Siberia.  Advancing  Nazi  Germany  army  murders  almost  all  of 

Kaunas’ Jews. By 1945 the city’s population is down to 80,000. 

1972: High school student Romas Kalanta protests against the soviet occupation of Lithuania by self-immolation. 

He sets himself on fire in a public square, in front of the Kaunas Musical Theatre. Kalanta’s death provokes the 

largest post-war riots in  the country. On  18  and  19  May  1972  students and workers march  along the  Freedom 

Avenue  (Laisvės  Alėja);  the  demonstration  is  violently  dispersed  by  the  KGB.  Other  cities  hold  their  own 

demonstrations.  In  the  1970s  and  80s,  Kalanta  becomes  a  symbol  of  Lithuanian  resistance  to  the  soviet 

occupation. 

1990: Lithuania announces its 

independence from the Soviet 

Union,  with  the capital city  of 

Vilnius.  Kaunas  somewhat 

declines  and  suffers  huge 

population  decreases  due  to 

emigration. 

However, 

its 


cultural  heritage  is  being 

revived in recent years.  




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling