Life and search of creative boundaries in the soviet epoch


Download 17.01 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet17/31
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi17.01 Mb.
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   31

4.6 Kiting – grad – the Sacred Russia and a dreamland  

 

In  continuation  in  Russian  culture  appear  an  image  and  a  philosophical  notion  of 



Kiting-grad  which  symbolically  represents  a  holly  land,  a  heaven  paradise,  which 

Russian souls yearn and long for; Kitiaj-grad becomes a final dream-destination of a 

stranger who searches a spiritual paradise at the earth. 

The Kitiag legend represents a cycle of fairy stories about the city which submerged 

in the lake Svetloiar and thus escaped devastation of Tatars. 

                                                                                                                                                        

Смирнов, И.П. Генезис. Философские очерки по социокультурной начинательности. СПб.: 

Алетейя, 2006. Бердяев, H.A. Душа России. Л.: Сказ, 1990, C.31., Лосский, Н.О. Условия 



абсолютного добра: Основы этики: Характер русского народа. М.: Политиздат, 1991, C.320-340. 

306


 Nelson, James M. Psychology, Religion, and Spirituality. Valparaiso: Springer science+ Business 

media, 2009, p.417. 

307

 Pazos, Antón M. Redefining Pilgrimage: New Perspectives on Historical and Contemporary 



Pilgrimages. Farnham: Ashgate Publishing Limited, 2014, p.44. 

  


 

 

235 



 

K. Gorbatov, Drowned city, 1933, oil on canvas. 

 

 

N. Roerich, Hymn to the Wildernessthe Battle of Kerzhenets, 1912, tempera on canvas,



 

52 х 70,5, sketch of a drop-

curtain for N. Rimsky-Korsakov’s opera Legend of the invisible grad-Kitiag and lady Fevronia for Diagelev seasons in 

Paris. 


The  name  Kitiag  originates  from  town  Kideksh  (a  village  4  km.  away  from  town 

Souzdal) which was destroyed by Tatars in 1237. By legend in a calm weather one 

may  hear  a  bell’s  ringing  and  in  the  depth  of  the  lake  see  the  buildings  of  the 

drowned city. Basing on the city’s legend and on the antique Russian narrative Peter 



and Fevronia, Russian composer Rimsky-Korsakov created opera the Legend of the 

invisible grad-Kitiag and lady Fevronia in 1907

308


                                                 

308

 Комарович, В.Л. Китежская легенда. (Опыт изучения местных легенд). М.: Наука, 1936, C.34-50. 



 

 

236 



The  significance  and  meaning  of  the  concept  Grad-Kitiag  faced  changes  during 

centuries in Russian philosophy, literature and art but never has it acquired so much 

importance  as  in  XX  century,  due  to  its  historical  and  cultural  changes.  Writer  S. 

Durilin who dedicated a book to the idea of Kitiag –grad - Church of the invisible city 

in  1914  proclaimed  it  “the  highest  symbol  of  Russian  national  religious  and 

philosophical conscience”

 309



 



 

B. Smirnov-Rusetsky, Not sinking Grad (Kitiag), 1977, tempera on canvas. 

 

Russian philosopher N. Berdiaev perfectly defined the spiritual meaning and aspect 



of the Kitiaj-grad for Russian people: “Russian soul is never quite, it is not a philistine, 

bourgeois soul, not a local soul. In Russia, in Russian people there is a kind of never-

ending  search  –  a  search  of  invisible  town  Kitiag,  an  unseen  home.  Russian  soul 

discovers  an  endless  expanse  and  there  is  no  delineated  horizon  in  front  of  its 

spiritual  gaze.  Russian  soul  burns  in  a  fervent  search  of  truth,  absolute,  divine  truth 

and salvation of the whole world and the overall resurrection towards a new life. It 

always sorrows for the grief and sufferings of people and of the whole world, and its 

harassment does not have any mitigation. This soul is overwhelmed with a search of 

final  damned  questions  on  life  sense.  There  is  a  stillness,  insubordination  and 

dissatisfaction of nothing temporal, conditional and relational in Russian soul. It has 

                                                 

309


 Дурылин, С.Н. Русь прикровенная. М.: Паломник, 2000, C.21. 

 

 

237 



to get forward and forward to the end, to the limit, to the exit of this world, of this 

land, of all local, bourgeois or affixed”

 310



In  the  poem  of  a  famous  poet  and  one  of  the  active  Nina  Slobodinskaya’s  social 



circle’s members M. Voloshin  Kitiag in 1919 the image of underwater city appears as 

an  eternal  dream  of  Russian  people,  while  a  real  Russian  history  during  all  its 

existence represents evil. The sacred Russia’s spirit is disembodied, disincarnated and 

does not have any contact points and contiguity with earth’s existence: 

“The sacred Russia is covered with a sinful Russia, 

And there is no way to that city, 

Where calls invocatory and mysterious 

Underwater ringing of church bells”

311



 



In the final tragic poem of Kliuev The song on a Great Mother of 1930-31 Kitiag-grad 

is shown as a mysterious centre of Russia

312



Russian  philosopher  Ilyin  of  XX  century  sees  Russian  history  as  a  history  of  a  fruitful 



creation  and  the  urge  of  Russians  of  Kitag-grad  is  regarded  as  people’s  soul’s 

tendency of deepening and sanctifying its everyday life, to accept and interpret life 

in religious terms. While Ilyin sees Kitag as a symbol of spiritual tradition, which inspires 

for the creation: “In dense soul’s thicket we found a mysterious spiritual lake. Grace 

to  it  we  find  our  wisdom;  from  it  we  started  gathering  of  our  strength  and  our 

struggle. And only occasionally Russian nation lost its way to Kitiag, entangled in nets 

of  fervours,  betraying  its  service”

  313


.  But  the  philosopher  believes  in  a  forthcoming 

resurrection  of  Russia:  “For  with  us  is  God  of  our  Kitiag”

314

.  The  poet-symbol  of  XX 



century Anna Ahmatova grace to the autobiographical allusions approximates the 

epoch  of  mysterious  city  Kitiag  to  the  life  epoch  of  the  writer,  and  Kitag  itself 

becomes  close  and  is  compared  to  the  demolished  by  the  Revolution  and  by 

repressions  Russia,  as  the  poet  feels  herself  an  heiress  of  that  Old  Russia.  Kitag 

appears there as a Christian synonym of paradise (heaven’s world to which belong 

saved souls; in Achmatova’s poem context souls of those who died as martyrs). It is 

described in Achmatova’s poem I laid my curly son of 1940. The lyric heroine hears a 

bell  ring  under  the  water  of  the  native  Kitiag  churches;  they  reprove  her  in  severe 

                                                 

310


 Бердяев, Н.А. Судьба России . М.: ООО «Издательство АСТ», 2004, C.27.

 

311



 Волошин, М.А. Средоточье всех путейСтихотворения и поэмы. Проза. Критика. Дневники. М: 

Моск. рабочий, 1989, C.91. 

312

 Клюев, Н.А. Сердце Единорога. Стихотворения и поэмы. СПб: РХГИ, 1999, C.168. 



313

 Ильин, И.А. Собр. соч. В 10 т., Т.6, Кн. II, М: Русская книга, 1996, C. 23, 25, 26. 

314

 Ibid, p.27. 



 

 

238 



voice as she escaped a bitter doom of other Kitiag citizens and they feel pity for her, 

waiting for her at God’s throne”

315

.  


Meanwhile Orthodox archbishop and theologian Ioan of Saint Francisco saw Kitiag 

as a hidden archetype of A. Solgentisin’s creative work: “In our days it’s Alexander 

Solgenitsin who has a privilege to touch the mystery of Svetloiar. He sees the place 

where  the  highest  truth  is  evanished,  which  remains  hidden  of  a  loud  and  vain 

word”

316


.  

The very  name  Kitiag Solgenitssin seems  to use just  once in  his  late  work Bell  tower 



(Kolokolnia) in description of violently submerged ancient town Kaliazin. 

 I see the same motive of pilgrimage and a road in the Peasant’s sculptural figure of 

Nina Slobodinskaya and I may suggest that our sculptural heroine turned to a search 

of the invisible and lost Kitiag-grad. It’s certainly a  hidden message which is not so 

obvious from the first glance. In context of a total social control the author could not 

permit herself to give a direct visual reference of her beliefs and philosophical views. 

However,  we  know  for  sure  that  Nina  Slobodinskaya  belonged  to  the  cultural 

intelligentsia cycle which shared beliefs of the high spiritual meaning of Kitiaj-grad, 

so  it  would  be  logic  to  suggest  that  the  author  expressed  her  vision  in  sculptural 

forms,  as  she  used  to  do  during  all  creative  life.  Knowingly  Berdiaev’s  description 

(previously  mentioned)  of  the  best  of  Russian  intelligentsia  may  be  applied  to  the 

sculptor’s social cycle:” The grandeur of Russian nation is concentrated at the type 

of  stranger.  A  Russian  type  of  stranger  is  expressed  not  only  in  life  of  Russian 

peasantry but also in its cultural life, in life of the best part of intelligentsia. And here, 

we know strangers with a free spirit, never attached to anything, eternal wayfarers, 

searching for an unseen city”

317

. 

This sculpture has various layers, sheets or levels of content’s meaning which we dare 

to  develop  and  explain  on  the  base  of  author’s  spiritual  vision.  Formally  sculptor 

follows  and  obeys  strict  artistic  rules  of  her  time.  The  chosen  theme  is  actual  –  a 

female peasant – new heroine of Soviet epoch. Her peasant’s appearance is shown 

very  clearly:  by  the  type  of  figure  and  the  dressing.  The  peasant  carries  a  hard 

weight,  which  indicates  her  implication  in  to  the  labour  –  the  basic  attribute  and 

                                                 

315

 Ахматова, А.А. Стихотворения. Поэмы. Проза. Томск: Томское кн. изд-во, 1989, C.369.



 

316


 Архиепископ Сан-Францисский, Иоанн. Дно Светлояра. Петрозаводск: “Святой остров”, 1992, 

C.28-75. 

317

 Бердяев, Н.А. Судьба России . М.: ООО «Издательство АСТ», 2004, C.27. 



 

 

 

239 



social  request  of  depiction  for  any peasant’s  image.  The  woman  steps  out  –  what 

permits to suggest that she is on her way to work – to the field (to gather a harvest)- 

even  more  emphasizes  the  theme  of  labour.  And  the  only  thing  may  prick  up 

attentive viewer’s eyes – the face expression of a peasant. Precisely her face make 

us first questioning and then gives us a hint and a possible response of what exactly 

lies beneath of the obvious message, what may be a hidden sense introduced by 

the  artist.  And  the  knowledge  of  her  life  views,  religious  convictions  and 

philosophical  beliefs  permits  us  to  give  a  deeper  interpretation  and  to  reveal  a 

spiritual  richness  and  multifaceted  content  of  senses  in  this  sculptural  image.  By 

means of sculpture’s face expression, this main detail, the master permits herself to 

express a deeper meaning and to fulfil the entire statue with a rich symbolic context. 

In  artistic  terms  the  plaster  cast  model  is  shaped  schematically,  with  a  rough 

energetic  surface,  but  the  volumes,  the  skeleton  and  the  muscles  are  clearly 

determined  and  carefully  underlined.  The  face  lineaments  are  well  worked  on.  It 

becomes  obvious  that  the  author  possesses  the  sculptor’s  craftsmanship,  however 

Slobodinskaya  does  not  stop  there  –  she  enriches  the  sculpture  with  the  spirit  of 

movement  and  idea.  This  tendency  to  depict  sculptural  images  in  a  dynamic 

movement  is  probably  Bourdelle’s  influence,  after  all  the  French  sculptor  was  her 



guru. Certainly it may seem subjective, but I dare to insist on this point of view basing 

on the knowledge of Slobodinskaya’s spiritual world vision. 

Generally  speaking,  a  young  sculptor  -  beginner  who  makes  the  very  first 

independent  steps  in  his  carrier  with  a  monumental  sculpture,  may  be  seen  as  a 



brave artist. Even if in future Slobodinskays gives preference to sculpture of a small 

format  and  other  genre,  her  early  experience  with  monumental  sculpture  proves 

that  she  already  possesses  a  necessary  technique  of  a  mature  artist  and,  what  is 

even more important, she is capable to transmit a symbolical depth and fullness of 

her images – qualities which reveals the artist as a deeply feeling, wise and complex 

personality. Together with the new State’s regime and the officially defined direction 

towards  art  at  service  to  politic  aims,  a  new  imagery  system  gradually  appeared. 

Regarding  a  female  image  in  art,  the  principle  one  becomes  an  image  of  a 

peasant,  a  worker,  a  female  character  which  belongs  to  the  working  class.  There 

was no art form or genre which would not touch this subject – new ideal of a Soviet 

woman. Nina Slobodinskaya responded to the social requests of her time, especially 

following the example of her main teacher in sculpture – Vera Ignatievna Muchina. 



 

 

240 



In order to understand a significance of a new female role in a social construction of 

the  Soviet  paradise  it’s  important  to  analyse  its  transformation.In  1920s  a  female 

image  of  a  peasant  is  a  synonym  of  a  pack-horse  –  physically  strong,  naive,  and 

obedient, completely resigned to her social duty. The image of a peasant woman 

with sickle in her hand, heavily-built figure – sign of fertility is not so common in the 

new  Bolshevik’s  art.  More  often  we  encounter  a  woman  –worker  –  as  an  ideal  of 

Soviet epoch. Such an image of a woman - peasant existed till the collectivization. 

Then a visual propaganda faced important changes. A new type of woman which 

represents  a  Russian  village  appears,  –  a  kind  of  an  ideal  villager  –  Kolhoznitsa.  A 

modernized  peasant  looks  differently  and  disposes  of  new  attributes:  a  wheeled 

tractor instead of sickle. Her figure also faces changes: she is more often depicted 

on her own, not in a middle of a crowd. It signified that in Soviet politic iconography 

an  important change took  place:  the  State had  to  achieve  and  conquer a  good 

will  and  affection  of  its  female  peasantry  population  as  precisely  those  women 

opposed the process of social reconstruction.  

 

4.7 Soviet Lelia and the archetype of prosperity’s goddess  

 

Another monumental sculptural work that apparently belongs to the same period of 



Slobodinskaya’s creative work is a life–size female figure which fairly may be called 

The  Soviet  Lelia  –  mythological,  the  Slave  pagan  goddess  of  prosperity.  Its 

approximate  dating  is  between1934-1940ss  according  to  Slobodinskaya’s  son 

Andrey Gnezdilov. It continues the artist’s series of female imagery. 

 

Slav’s goddess Lelia, VI-VIII c. A.C, traditional ancient wooden scullpture. 


 

 

241 



 

 

N. Slobodinskaya, Soviet Lelia, 1930s, plasticine. 



 

Unfortunately, once again we are able to analyse this sculptural image basing only 

on  the  preserved  photo  as  its  main  proof  of  existence.  A  viewer  sees  a  woman 

carrying  on  her  right shoulder  a  molly  –  a basket  full  of ripe fruits. Her  figure  seems 

heavy  but  proportional.  Her  legs  resemble  tree-trunks  as  they  look  so  incredibly 

huge. The muscles of her hands are very well pronounced. The hands are enormous 

in comparison with her thin head and more remind hands of a strong  man than of 

any  woman.  Her  straight  back  and  silhouette  of  her  dress  underlines  the 

proportionality  of  her  figure.  Even  having  monumental  forms  her  image  is  full  of 

refinement, dignity, confidence and calmness. The female figure seems to step out 

of an earth-paradise – the Eden full of harvest and ripe fruits. Her kerchief elongates 


 

 

242 



her head, and the basket on her shoulders equalizes the balance with her enormous 

feet and the round pedestal. 

In terms of Soviet iconography the sculptural image signifies prosperity and richness 

that  brings  labour  in  frames  of  communist’s  regime.  In  a  wider  meaning’s 

perspective  it  may  be  regarded  as  an  archetype  image  of  a  pagan  goddess 

responsible  for  fertility  and  prosperity  –  the  image  that  Slavs  used  to  depict  in 

wooden  sculpture,  installing  them  in  midst  of  wild  woods.  Besides  it’s  a  one  of  the 

most portrayed characters in the worldwide mythology and visual iconography. As 

we  see  the  artist’s  interpretation  of  the  image  should  not  be  just  limited  to  Soviet 

attributes and communist’s propaganda message. It is obvious that any Soviet artist 

had  frames  of  his  artistic  liberty.  However,  more  often  those  frames  were 

conventional.  A  sincere  artist  tried  to  overcome  the  conventionality  of  those 

demands. To find out whether they succeeded in it or not we may achieve by the 

means of individual analysis of every particular case and art piece. 

Regarding  the  Soviet  Lelia  and  the  Peasant  of  Slobodinskaya,  the  external 

conventional  attributes  may  be  seen  in  the  manner  of  figure’s  dressing,  in  the 

realistic style of portrayal and also in a subject matter. The typical hypercritical Soviet 

journalist  or  any  art  critic  formally  cannot  accuse  the  artist  of  sculpture’s 

appearance’s  discordance  with  the  official  artistic  requests.  However  they  neither 

can  blame  the  author  for  imbuing  the  sculptural  figure  with  other  sense  or  other 

meaning’s dimension, in particular with the meaning which is deeper or richer than 

the Soviet demands obliged. 

Hence, what I dare to suggest is that any artist who had their creative individuality, 

who  listened  to  himself  and  was  able  to  find  his  proper  plastic  and  imagery 

language “would not repeat the existing forms but discover his artistic personality”

318

 

-  the  most  important  quality  which  according  to  Bourdelle  characterized  a  true 



master,  was  able  to  overcome  the  limitations  (which  the  Soviet  government 

imposed to all creative workers) and creatively express himself. 

Creatively  rich personality,  the  mature artist  with a  fully  formed  world vision  always 

found  ways  to  express  her-self.  When  a  subject  was  an  object  of  limitation  than 

Slobodinskaya fulfilled an image with a deeper meaning and sense by means of her 

artistic  skills  and  as  we  see  in  our  case  -  the  simple  peasant  woman  turns  into  a 

                                                 

318


 Деготь, Е.Ю. История русского искусства. Русское искусствоXX в. М.: Трилистник, 2002, C.224. 

 

 

243 



spiritual pilgrim which is correlated to Russian philosophical searches and turns in to 

an archetype personage which constantly appears in Russian fairy-tale folklore. 

Looking  ahead,  when  the  sculptor  had  to  portray  only  Soviet  heroes  or  significant 

personalities of a new communist era – nobody stopped the artist of creating deeply 

psychological  intimate  images,  which  aimed  to  explore  a  person’s  soul  and 

discovered  his  spiritual  essence,  -  thus  the  artist  was  able  to  bridge  over  the 

conventionality of the imposed art frames. We may suggest that artists in all fields of 

fine arts faced similar conditions, options and possibilities. It could be our response to 

a  crucial  challenge  and  the  polemic  question  which  many  contemporary 

philosophers, artists and researchers make: how artists of the Soviet epoch used to 

deal with an issue of a personal artistic freedom of expression, - whether artists were 

able to overcome the imposed limitations, and in case if they succeeded, in what 

way  did  they  overpass  the  restrictions  which  the  Soviet  iconography  intended  to 

impose. 


 

4.8 Woman with a gun - a woman – hero 

 

 

N.  Slobodinskaya, Woman with a gun, 1935-1940, plaster cast. 



 

 

244 



 

 

N.  Slobodinskaya, Woman with a gun, 1935-1940, plaster cast. 



 

Another  monumental  work  of  the  artist  which  characterizes  the  early  period  is  the 



Woman with a gun

It’s a white plaster cast model of a supposedly life-size figure. The exact date of its 

creation is unknown but it varies between1935-1940ss. The sculpture was destroyed 

during the Second World War. We see the portrayal of a woman with large massive 

forms  and  disproportionally  huge  feet  which  reminds  the  volumes  of  Vera’s 

Muchina’s Peasant’s legs. The female personage certainly belongs to a peasant or a 

working class. A typical dress, a head and hair with a kerchief on  – she has all the 

attributes  of  a  Soviet  woman  -  hero.  All  her  pose  expresses  obstinacy, 

aggressiveness, physical strength and spirit’s firmness. She holds a gun in her hands 

with an absolute confidence. The patrons surround her breast and recall the viewer 



 

 

245 



that she is not a simple week woman, instead, she is a warrior first of all. We can be 

sure – meeting an enemy this woman will not doubt before shutting him. The incline 

of her right knee emphasizes this stubborn strength which she embodies. 

No doubt, the Soviet enemy would be threatened by finding such a personage at 

the open air battle. Her straight gaze, protruding chin, all indicates a strong will and 

even a possessiveness to complete her debt to the native land no matter where: at 

a  field,  gathering  harvest,  at  factory  –  holding  tools,  or  at  a  field  of  a  battle. 

Accordingly  the  coded  message  appears  to  be  following:  no  matter  what  the 

native land asks you to do – you have to obey and even be ready to sacrifice your 

interest, your life if it would be necessary.  The Soviet State wanted a Russian nation 

to  assimilate  this  idea.  Consequently  these  propaganda  message  artists  had  to 

visualize monumentally. An image of a woman – hero – is widely displayed in all the 

fine  arts  fields  especially  in  1930s.  In  terms  of  the  Soviet  political  thought  Russian 

population had to be ready to meet enemies and to defend their happy light future 

–  the  utopian  dream  imposed  to  the  population.  Moreover,  in  context  of  Soviet 

ideology enemies could appear not only  from foreign countries but they could be 

uncovered at the proper Russian territory. A Soviet citizen always had to be attentive 

and  suspicious  –that’s  what  proclaim  thousands  of  Soviet  posters  and  that’s  the 

manner  and  a  trick  in  which  Communist  totalitarian  government  introduces  and 

imposes  the  idea  of  spying  to  the  nation.  Such  are  the  visually  effective  means 

which  communist  leaders  adapt  in  order  to  justify  the  idea  of  spying:  your 

environment – neighbours, colleagues, even your proper family are under suspicion.   

 

    


       

      


 

 

Be  caref  ul,  an  enemy  is  not  asleep!,  Don’t  chat!  Enemy  is  treacherous  –  be  on  alarm!  1930s,  Samples  of  Soviet 

Posters. 

1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   31


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling