Life and search of creative boundaries in the soviet epoch


N. Slobodinskaya, Turkmenian girl with cotton, 1942-43, plasticine.    6.5 Turkmen girl with cotton


Download 17.01 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet22/31
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi17.01 Mb.
1   ...   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   ...   31

 

N. Slobodinskaya, Turkmenian girl with cotton, 1942-43, plasticine. 

 

6.5 Turkmen girl with cotton - Turkmen Nefertiti 

 

The  Turkmen  girl  with  cotton  represents  a  sculptural  small-sized  plasticized  sketch, 

which approximately dates 1942 – 43ss. It displays a full of lyricism and inner poetry 

image  of  a  young  beautiful  woman  in  traditional  Turkmen  dress,  bearing  a  head 

gear. The young woman holds cotton in her skirts. One of the applied artistic means 

of expressiveness - the figure’s posture: the female figure is not shown in static pose, 

but  rather  in  a  natural  and  free  movement.  She  is  depicted  stepping  at  the  stairs, 

while  gazing  upwards.  Although  she’s  got  a  buggy  voluminous  dress,  an  outlined 

breast  and  declivous  shoulders,  all  indicate  at  her  true  beauty,  a  refinement  and 

slenderness  of  her  young  proportional  figure.  Wide  traditional  shoes  underline  her 

thin  ankles.  The  sculpture’s  fine  head  proportions  and  the  head  gear  permits  to 

name  her  a  Turkmen  Nefertiti  (mainly  due  to  the  beautifully  shaped  and  outlined 

head’s  skeleton  form  together  with  a  full  of  dignity  and  self-respect  gaze).  This 


 

 

290 



comparison appears naturally, the sculpted statuette definitely recalls the legendary 

image.The figure’s pose is full of calmness, self-discipline and preciseness. The artist 

aimed  to  depict  her  in  the  natural  environment  of  work:  gathering  cotton  in  the 

fields.  The  stone  like  element  behind  the  young  woman  indicates  at  the  nature’s 

entourage. A motive of cotton gathering is not the unique in a range of sculptor’s 

Asian sculptures. Cotton gathering – was one of the main type of work in the country 

as during the Soviet epoch Uzbekistan was one of the major cotton providers of all 

the USSR.The figure’s gaze is full of deep thoughtfulness, an inner self concentration, 

sadness and dreaminess, hope and tenderness. As if the author would aim to show 

us  all  her  rich  feelings  spectrum,  the  emotional  fullness  of  her  heart  and  soul.  Her 

deep emotional world which we may guess in her gaze, her stormy emotional state 

is emphasized by her appearance: a rich dress’s lines texture and its curves. A viewer 

can  guess  in  the  portrayed  a  sensible,  emotionally  full,  thin  young  woman.  By 

external attributes (cotton in the skirts, nature’s element) the female figure may  be 

symbolically  associated  with  an  image  of  prosperity  –  a  goddess  so  beloved  and 

often displayed by the master in different styles and manners. The girl’s appearance 

clearly  indicates  at  her  national  traits  and  Asian  origin,  although  the  author 

accentuates  and  mainly  depicts  her  individuality.  The  whole  rich  sculptural 

composition  with  base  permits  to  assume  that  this  sculptural  sketch  was  probably 

conceived  as  a  model  for  a  monument.  Unfortunately  there  is  no  documentary 

evidence  to  prove  it.  The  architectonical  proportions  of  the  composition  are 

adhered  exactly.  There  is  no  information  left  if  the  sculptor  exhibited  or  turned  this 

plasticine  sketch  into a  more  solid  material  or  which  precise  dimensions  it  had. It’s 

interesting  to  compare  two  different  visions  of  the  female  Asian  characters  of 

Russian  sculptors.  One  belongs  to  the  Professor  Vera  Muchina  and  other  to  her 

apprentice – Nina Slobodinskaya. Muchina’s Uzbek girl is full of dynamism, purposeful 

determination,  her  figure  seems  light,  but  her  step  is  heavy.  Uzbek  girl’s  face  is 

shaped  schematically,  its  face  expression  is  not  personified;  Muchina’s  sculptural 

image  by  itself  seems  to  embody  a  symbol  –  sign  of  will,  a  perpetual  motion, 

confidence. Meanwhile Slobodinskaya’s Turkmen female image is full of inner lyrics, 

individualized poetry of female sensitivity, tenderness and sadness. While Uzbek girl 

determinately but unthoughtfully continues her way, Turkmen girl stops in the state of 

dreaminess and pensiveness, concentrated on her inner world, in a silent dialogue 

with the world. 



 

 

291 



 

N. Slobodinskaya, Turkmen shepherd, 1942-43, plasticine. 

 

  

 

 

 

N. Slobodinskaya, Turkmen shepherd, 1942-43, plaster cast, 31 x 20 x 55. 



 

 

 

292 



 

Photo of the Market place, early XX, Rigistan, Samarkand,  Bogaevsky. 

 

6.6 Turkmen shepherd or a dialogue with eternity 

 

The Turkmen shepherd can be regarded as a brilliant example of Asian portrayals. 

Seating in a natural pose, an old man is playing some national musical instrument. 

He  is  haggard,  peaked  and  gazes  directly  at  viewer.  His  figure  is shaped  in  detail, 

without any hint at schematic manner of depiction.  

Apparently, in approach to work Nina Slobodinskaya follows the basic advises of her 

teacher Vera Muchina – to seek a truthfulness of depiction, and consequently uses 

realistic  method,  portraying  without  mercy,  naturalistically  all  the  age  signs  of  the 

Turkmen  man.  Nevertheless,  the  main  idea  of  the  author  was  not  to  show  the 

ugliness of oldness, but instead a tense, complex and rich inner life of this personage, 

on which age has no influence. Through the sounds of his musical instrument the old 

man seems to have a silent, mute dialogue with him-self, his soul, possibly recalling 

important, happy moments of past, or may be preparing to his meeting with Future. 

Quite often during this creative period and further Nina Slobodinskaya portrays old 

people.  Those  images  are  always  very  expressive,  full  of  inner  meaning  and 

personalization. Without neglecting the pure sculptural qualities of the work, we may 



 

 

293 



suggest that the key message the sculptor attempts to transmit – spiritual fulfilment of 

an inner model’s world. 

Anna  Golubkina,  who  was  a  guru  in  sculpture  for  Nina  Slobodinskaya,  discovered 

images’ richness and beauty in subject of oldness, and I suppose it was due to her 

creative influence that such a theme was so often developed and displayed by our 

sculptor. 

 

  

     



 

 A. Golubkina, Oldness, 1898, bronze.                                    O. Rodin, Old courtisan, 1884-85, bronze. 

 

Being a philosopher in stone, looking for a deep psychological characteristic of her 



models,  Golubkina  in  her  sculptural  work  the  Oldness  revealed  an  inner  world’s 

human  beauty,  which  in  this  case  is  shining  even  through  the  physical  traits  of 

wasting  away.  Anna  Golubkina  achieved  to  depict  oldness  as  a  natural  step  into 

eternity. She depicted an old lady seating in the same pose as a child in his mother’s 

belly, trying to feature that oldness appears as a temporal state before a new birth, 

and  that  life  itself  turns  as  an  infinite  circle,  Golubkina’s  sculptural  figure  creates  a 

circle by its composition. This sculptural image was a kind of response of apprentice 

Golubkina to her teacher Rodin, who depicted an old courtesan, accentuating the 

physiological ugliness of oldness.  

Nina  Slobodinskaya  also  appears  to  be  a  real  philosopher  and  psychologist  in 

sculpture.  The  key  subjects  that  inspire  her  and  evoke  her  professional  interest  are 

human  characters,  complex  personalities,  which  she  attempts  to  explore  and  to 

reveal their characters’ inner life’s essence. 



 

 

294 



The sculptor’s analysis is not over with a detailed portrayal of model’s physical traits; 

Slobodinskaya  is  looking  for  more  –  a  deep  characteristic  of  individuality’s 

complexity,  richness  and  multi-dimensional  aspects  of  his  personality.  In  the  Asian 

creative period Nina Slobodinskaya evinces as already a mature formed artist, who 

has  developed  and  determined  her  own  plastic  language  of  expression  and 

consciously  and independently  selected  the  key  subject  in  her creative  work.  Thus 

sculptor’s main source of inspiration and the leitmotiv of her work becomes a human 

being. The artist will be faithful to this theme the rest of her life through the variety of 

sculptural images and forms. 

Being  away  from  Leningrad and  the strict  official demands,  the  firm  control  of  the 

Artists’ Union, Slobodinskaya finally feels free to search for subjects interesting for her. 

She did not feel pressure any more to depict just socialistically orientated optimistic 

images  with  a  main  purpose  of  propaganda;  instead  she  displays  people  in  their 

everyday  life  in  natural  environment  of  Samarkand,  concentrating  her  creative 

search on displaying their deep human psychological and spiritual essence. I think it 

is  significant,  that  the  artist  chooses  to  work  on  deep  full  of  humanism,  intimal 

psychological  sculptural  portrayals  in  the  epoch,  when  all  personal  had  to  be  on 

service  of  the  Social,  following  the  State’s  aims;  at  the  period  when  an  interest  to  

intimal  interior  world  of  a  person  was  officially  neglected,  violently  and  artificially 

supressed  and  substituted  with  a  new  ideal  -  man’s  life  and  interest  to  him  was 

justified, only conditioned by his successful service to the society, - to the State. 

 

6.7 Girl with a grape or the Asian’s bliss 



 

Another coloured plaster cast statuette which Nina Slobodinskaya created was The 



Girl with a grape – a lyric image of an apparently 10 year’s old girl who is shaped in 

a natural pose holding a grape in her hands.  Her posture is relaxed and calm. The 

moment when the author saw her and was inspired was probably an instant when 

the girl was gathering grape in her parents’ garden. The figure’s head is inclined. The 

girl is thinking or dreaming, she is not looking at the viewer but she is in silent dialogue 

with herself. 

 


 

 

295 



  

 

N. Slobodinskaya, A girl with grape, 1942-43, coloured plaster cast, 30 x10 x 41. 



 

 

 



N. Slobodinskaya, A girl with grape, 1942-43, coloured plaster cast, 30 x10 x 41. 

 

 

296 



 

 

At the market, 1930s, photo, Paul Nadar. 



 

Detachment,  concentration  on  inner  thoughts,  inner  spiritual  world  of  a  portrayed 

model,  philosophical  meditation  –  it’s  a  common  trait  of  the  sculptor’s  sphere  of 

artistic search.  The girl’s figure’s pose creates an expressive visual curve. Precisely in 

this  period  the  author  starts  colouring  her  plaster  cast  figures.  Apparently  south 

colours inspire  the  artist  to  express vividness,  contrast  and  brightness  of  Uzbekistan. 

Contrast colours give a new expressiveness to her sculptural figurines. 

A rich, lash dark brown-orange colour of the girl’s body creates a visually expressive 

contrast with her blue traditional Uzbek trousers, accentuates her wide cheek-bones, 

eyelashes,  and  a  straight  line  of  her  black  hair.  The  colouring  gives  a  new  sound, 

new image’s expressiveness to the statuette, which reminds terracotta figurines. 

The blue accentuated voluminous trousers emphasize the impression of lightness and 

refinement of the young lady. The master seems to will and depict not just a figure’s 

movement but through it - also a movement of her thoughts, her heart and her soul. 

Later the sculptor follows and further develops this artistic tendency in the Asian and 

the  post-war  period  in  order  to  concentrate  viewer’s  attention  not  on  external 

movement  and  physical  traits,  but  on  the  character’s  inner  movement; 


 

 

297 



Slobodinskaya creates a number of static figures which seem to come to a standstill 

and stand motionless. To one of such examples may be related The Turk with a pipe. 

 

 

N. Slobodinskaya, Turk with a pipe, 1942-1943, plasticine,  

 

 

Near the mosque, 1930s, photo, Paul Nadar. 



 

 

 

298 



 

6.8 Turk with a pipe and the state of recollections 

 

His motionless figure cannot be more expressive. Every muscle, every body’s detail 

are so properly shaped and his face is so incredibly vivid, that the first impression a 

viewer gets  –  that  he sees a  photo  of  a real  man,  not  of  an  elaborated  plasticine 

figure.  His  neck,  shoulders  are  perfectly  outlined,  his  face  with  an  accentuated 

wrinkles is attentively pronounced which indicates how deeply and  he remains in his 

thoughts,  being  profoundly  concentrated  on  reading.  He  firmly  holds  his  pipe  and 

the fingers of his feet are effectively thrown out. So realistically and vividly the author 

creates  this  man,  which  a  passer-by  in  the  twilight’s  time  would  take  for  real.  This 

work  is  another  testimony  that  the  sculptor  achieved  a  high  level  of  the  refined 

technique,  in  addition  the  sculptor  tends  to  depict  not  just  a  figure’s  physical 

reproduction  but  something  which  is  more  difficult  to  show  –  the  model’s  state  of 

mind,  to  give  a  profound  psychological  characteristic  and  to  display  his  intimal 

personal  portrayal.  Unfortunately  only  the  photo  is  left  as  the  proof  of  this  unique 

sculptural image.  

 

6.9 Old Uzbek – guardian of the past 



 

Another work of Slobodinskaya which corresponds to the subject of oldness created 

during her refuge in Samarkand was The Old Uzbek

Without posing the depicted old man simply and naturally seats in his usual manner. 

We may imagine this man in the calm streets of Samarkand, passing another usual 

day,  meditating  on  his  life.  The  manner  of  depiction  seems  to  be  truthful  and 

realistic.  A  small-scale  coloured  plaster  cast  statuette  appears  to  embody  all  the 

south  characteristic  of  Asian  traits  such  as  calmness,  sluggishness,  a  lazy  slowness, 

which  also  mirrors  an  atmosphere  of  tranquillity  and  laziness  prevailing  in  the 

environment of Samarkand in the middle of XX century. 



 

 

299 



 

N. Slobodinskaya, Old Uzbek, 1943 -1944, colored plaster cast, 38 x 18 x 112. 

 

  

     

 

 

N. Slobodinskaya, Old Uzbek, 1943-1944, colored plaster cast, 38 x 18 x 112. 



 

 

300 



 

 

At the market, Samarkand, 1930s, photo, Paul Nadar. 

 

 



The  accentuated  wrinkles  and  a  tensioned  front  indicate  at  a  big  life  experience 

and  a  heavy  memory’s  luggage,  which  counts  a  minimum  three  generations.  The 

old man personifies a vivid memory and the history of Samarkand. In his eyes viewer 

may  guess  tiredness,  sadness  and  yearning,  probably  of  the  majestic  past  of 

Tamerlane’s lands or his aspirations to see a lighter future of his native land. 

The same immobility and motionless of human figures were captured by the official 

photographer of the former Russian Empire -  S. M. Prokudin-Gorsky who in the early 

XX century was sent by the order of Imperator Nicolay II to Uzbekistan with purpose 

to portray local life and people. These images served also as a visual illustration of life 

realities  which  further  were  recreated  for  the  official  report  to  the  State’s 

Geographical Society. 

The ease and naturalness of his pose, a vivid expressiveness of his face, a detailed 

portrayal  of  his  body,  the  colourful  contrasts  of  the  silhouette  and  the  figure’s 

proportions  perfection  –  all  indicates  at  the  sculptor’s  high  technique  level,  at  the  

developed skills and the practical knowledge and a respectful mature philosophical 


 

 

301 



attitude  to  model.  The  sculptor  enjoys  contemplating  the  portrayed  characters, 

trying to demonstrate their spiritual essence. 

 

6.10 Talking man and thought’s movement  

 

Nina  Slobodinskaya  liked  experimenting  with  different  sculptural  genres,  so  she 

decides to use a relief’s form to portray an image of the Talking man

 

 

N. Slobodinskaya, Talking man, 1943-44, tinted plaster cast, 40 x 50 x 54, relief. 

 

The  artist  originally coloured  the image,  which  with  the  time  almost  lost  its  colours’ 

intensity. A vivid face expression gives impression of an inner thoughtfulness, mental 

movement,  demonstrates  the  beauty  of  an  actively  thinking  and  dialoguing  man; 

these traits are accentuated by the active fingers’ depiction, an open mouth and a 

tensioned  front.  The  sculptor  had  found  her  central  subject  in  sculpture  and  now 

faithfully  continued  working  on  portrayals  of  interesting  and  curious  characters  as 


 

 

302 



she  liked  to  say  to  her  friends  and  family

375


.  The  author  did  not  avoid  life-size 

sculptural portraits format. As was mentioned before a material’s scarcity was one of 

the  reasons  she  sculpted  mainly  small  scale works  during  this  period.  But  there  are 

two bright examples which demonstrate the master’s inclination towards sculptural 

portraits genre. 

 

        



 

N. Slobodinskaya, Zulfia, 1943-1944, bronze, 32 x 21 x 58.  N. Slobodinskaya, Zulfia, 1943-1944, plaster cast, 32 x 21 x 58. 



 

N. Slobodinskaya’s Zulfia’s sculpture in the Leningrad magazine, 1945, N3.



 

                                                 

375

 Andrey Gnezdilov’s verbal recallings, interviewed on 09.08.14. 



 

 

303 



  

 

The mentioning of N. Slobodinskaya’s Zulfia’s sculptural portrait in The newspaper Leningradskaya Pravda, n.49, 1945. 

 

6.11 Zulfia – youth and stubbornness 

 

Zulfia – a sculptural portrait of a young Uzbek girl who significantly lifts up her head, 

showing  dignity,  self-confidence  and  youth’s  stubbornness.  The  girl  –  is  a 

characteristic example of Uzbek’s beauty: oval face, pug nose, outlined eyebrows 

accentuate the beautiful oval of her face, her gaze is full of both: dignity, firmness 

and  independence  -  a  strong  character’s  manifestation.  But  simultaneously  the 

portrayed  image  is  full  of  lyrics,  tenderness  and  a  refined  beauty.  The  sculptor  as 

usual tends to catch and portray the individual psychological essence of the young 

complex and contradictory character.  

The  sculptural  image  was  exhibited  at  Leningrad  official  periodic  show  and 

impressed the critics. it deserved a special mentioning in various published editions 

sources,  such  as  a  popular  the  Leningrad  magazine,  being  illustrated  on  the  last 

page,  where  they  used  to  publicize  works  of  art  of  the  top  interest;  further  this 

sculptural  image  appears  in  the  Leningradskaya  Pravda  newspaper,  where  the 

critic, Dr, and journalist Lobrokovsky gives a special attention to the  Zulfia’s work in 

1945. 


 

 

304 



 

6.12 Oriental Madonna - dialogue with a soul 

 

The strongest and the most significant sculptural work of Nina Slobodinskaya, which 

may  be  considered  crucial  and  resulting  in  all  her  creative  Asian  period  in 

Samarkand is The Oriental Madonna. 



 

 

 

 



N. Slobodinskaya, Oriental Madonna, 1940-47, marble, 49 x 30 x 21. 

 

 

 

305 



       

    

 

N. Slobodinskaya, Oriental Madonna, 1940-47, marble, 49 x 30 x 21. 

 

 

Michelangelo, Medici Madonna (fragment), 1521 -1634, marble, the Basilica of San Lorenzo, Florence. 



 

 

306 



 

 P. Kuznetsov, Step, 1910s, oil on canvas. 

 

There  is  a  curious  background  history  of  the  sculptural  image’s  creation.  Once,  in 



Samarkand Nina Slobodinskaya went to the market to buy some food for her family. 

In a short while a  hungry husband and her son suddenly saw  her returning without 

anything  but  a  Tadjik’s  young  woman  hand  in  hand.  Nina  Slobodinskaya  was  so 

excited  and  did  not  stop  exclaiming:  “Don’t  you  see?  She  has  got  Madonna’s 

face”

376


! The family neither got lunch nor a proper supper that day, but the sculptor 

passionately  started  working  on  the  new  project  with  all  her  enthusiasm  and 

determination. 

 As  to  the  sculptor’s  work’s  manner,  there  were  strict  rules:  while  sculpting  the 

sculptor did not tolerate any interference. Any meddling in her work process was not 

only undesirable but even unacceptable. The author’s studio was a sacred territory 

for her family and friends. Her beloved preserved this respect towards the sculptor’s 

work till the last days of her life. 

Being  a  complex  personality  herself,  Nina  Slobodinskaya  was  able  to  discover  rich 

individualities around her and tended to portray them revealing and exposing their 

true  deep  essential  psychological  and  spiritual  characters.  Gradually  carving,  she 

achieves  to  uncover  and  expose  a  complexity  of  a  portrayed  personality.  As  an 

artist and good psychologist she used first to explore and get to know a person she 

                                                 

376

 Verbal recallections of Andrey Gnezdilov, interviewed on 07.08.14. 



 

 

307 



willed  to  sculpt,  so  the  majority  of  her  best  works  are  shaped  in  direct  work  and 

contact with a model. 

As a result of the hard work - we see the sculptural portrait of a young Asian woman. 

Its prolonged beautiful form of head reminds a famous Nefertiti’s image. The model’s 

hair, gathered by a kerchief is a reminiscent of Renaissance’s type of hair gear sell

Her  head  is  a  beat  inclined,  a  thin  prolonged  cranium  and  the  oval  of  her  face 

accentuates  finesse  and  a  refined  feminine  image  of  the  model:  the  underlined 

cheek-bones, a prolonged nose, a pronounced mouth, slightly swivel-eyed, her thin 

neck delicately holds a perfect form’s head. The young woman seems to be full of 

thoughtfulness, hidden tenderness and simultaneously of the fatigue. The portrayed 

lady  is  not  dialoguing  with  a  viewer,  instead  she’s  fully  concentrated  on  her  inner 

world, and a hard work seems to take place in this complex and contradictory mind. 

The sculptor seems to uncover young woman’s profound psychological character, 

brings out her complex inner world, denuding her spiritual essence. Viewer may also 

guess in a young lady’s portrait  – sadness, obedience, a quiet tenderness, a deep 

thoughtfulness.  Her  thoughts  seem  to  be  far  from  life’s  vanity.  By  state  of 

philosophical  contemplation,  calmness,  tenderness  and  a  light  trait  of  sadness  the 

Asian  Madonna  recalls  the  Medici  Madonna  of  Michelangelo.  The  inclined  head, 

the glance directed inside – all hints at inner self-concentration, an inner silence of 

both female sculptural images. 

Another aspect which the artist successfully achieves to catch and display would be 

the essence of a female Asian national character: restraint, obedience, resignation, 

tenderness but simultaneously an inner will and strength, appearing in the necessary 

life moments.  

Furthermore, in addition to inner strength which the female image transmits, it also 

leaves some enigmatic feeling of vagueness, kind of innuendo and mystery.  That’s 

probably why viewer’s gaze repeatedly returns to this female Asian’s sculpture, as if 

trying to find an answer to a riddle, and yet The Eastern Madonna remains a thing-in-

itself. 

Human images and atmosphere of Kuznetsov’s Asian painting is incredibly close by 

its spirit and emotional appeal to the sculptural depiction of N. Slobodinskaya. 

Calmness, sadness, obedience to the same life’s rhythm and time’s current, kind of 

personages’ interior self-concentration and insularity characterize both – personages 

of the Step and the Asian sculptural image. 



 

 

308 



As to creative approach, sculptor Slobodinskaya used classical technique, applying 

realistic  style  of  sculpting  based  on  Vera’s  Mukhina  method.  Finally  the  sculptural 

portrait  of  the  Oriental  Madonna  was  purchased  by  the  State  Museum  in 

Komsomolsk-na Amure and actually belongs to its permanent collection.   

Man’s  inner  dialogue  with  himself,  dialogue  of  soul  with  heart,  a  tensed  inner 

psychological  work  and  life,  a  search  for  spirituality  in  person  -  define  the  field  of 

highest artistic purposes and creative interests of Nina Slobodinskaya. These creative 

searches  directly  correspond  to  spiritual  beliefs,  philosophical  interests,  and  life 

searches of Nina’s Slobodinskaya and her close environment. 

 

                          



 

K. Petrov-Vodkin, Portrait of an Uzbek boy, 1921, oil on canvas.  I. Getmanskaya, Uzbek’s boy, 1961, oil on canvas. 

 




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   ...   31


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling