Life and search of creative boundaries in the soviet epoch


 Soviet artists: new role, new goal


Download 17.01 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet3/31
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi17.01 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   31

2.2 Soviet artists: new role, new goal  

The First Five years plan. 1928 – 1932. 

The First Five Years Plan

38

 (which was initiated in 1928) foreshadowed the more strict 



policy  toward  art,  which  become  a  main  visual  tool  of  the  new  regime’s 

consolidation during the Stalinist’s period.  

                                                 

36

 М. Делягин. “Сотвори кумира”.  Завтра, №40 (672), 2006, C.18.



 

37

 Kitiaj-grad – a sacred space of spiritual Russian dream existed for centuries in Russian folk and 



legendary tradtion, later in XIX century was widely displayed in art and theological Russian thought. 

Existing as a direcly appealing artistic archetype became  a reference for new communistic ideology 

and on its base was created a new utopical dream-land of Communist’s prosoperity ; it was well 

illustrated by 

Криничная, Н. А. Легенды о невидимом граде Китежемифологема взыскания 

сокровенного града в фольклорной и литературной прозe. Евангельский текст в русской 

литературе XVIII—XX веков. Петрозаводск: Вып. 4, 2005, С.53-66. 

38

 “The first five-year plan of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) was a list of economic goals



created by General Secretary Joseph Stalin and based on his policy of Socialism in One Country. It was 

implemented between 1928 and 1932.In 1929, Stalin edited the plan to include the creation of "kolkhoz 



 

 

41 



Logically appears a problem of Artist’s fate in the totalitarian State. It is a crucial and 

vital issue for Soviet artists, which was most brightly reflected in literature by famous 

Russian  writer  Mikhail  Boulgakov  in  his  novel  Master  and  Margarita.  The  writer 

describes  Moscow  in  its  1930s,  which  appears  as  kind  of  hell,  where  flourish  all  the 

most unworthy passions, while in the creative fields survive only hacks, people with 

lack  of  talent,  time-servers.  Writers  of  the  official creative union  –  the  MASSOLIT  do 

not  write,  instead,  actively  solving  their  proper  social  problems  –  flats,  second 

residences  etc.,  concerned  only  by  their  social  success.  Thus  cynic,  pragmatic 

characters  form  the  creative  atmosphere  of  Moscow  in  1930s.  In  M.  Boulgakov’s 

novel  the  conflict  of  a  free-thinking  artist  who  opposes  by  his  sincere  and  fearless 



Pontius  Pilate  novel  to  the  kingdom  of  mediocrity  and  ordinariness  ended  in  an 

expected way: Master enters the psychiatric hospital in a state of nervous shock as 

in his proper words he does not stand violence, bad poetry and social commission. 

This  hero  was  deprived  of  the  most  crucial  for  Artist  –  freedom  of  Creativity.  In 

Boulgakov’s main idea the fate of a true artist used to end tragically in conditions of 

totalitarian  State,  where  talent  and  interior  freedom  were  not  valued,  but 

substituted, instead, by agreeableness and mediocrity. 

The Plan stated that its major cultural aims consisted  of increase  of the proletarian 

consumption  of  art  but  it  also  supposed  an  entire  reorganization  of  art  under  the 

party’s instructions. Accordingly, the following year sculptors, painters, graphic and 

decorative  artists,  architects  were  united  under  a  single  artists'  group  -  The 

Vsekokhudozhnik, headed by Y.M. Slavinsky. "There was a hope that it would bring 

unity  and  creative  uniformity  capable  of  placing  the  Soviet  art  behind  the 

industrialization’s collectivization drive”

39

 in the Soviet economy. 



In  the  opinion  of  Alexandre  Karnensky  in  his  work  Art  in  the  Twilight  of  the 

totalitarianism, the years of the Second World War have a special place in Soviet art. 

At this time period, aesthetic debates were suspended to give way to the use of art 

as propaganda

40

. The works of 1941-1945ss are mainly of documental interest of their 



time. As to1946 -1954ss, the party made everything to take an entire control of art. 

                                                                                                                                                        

collective farming systems that stretched over thousands of acres of land and had hundreds of 

peasants working on them. The creation of collective farmsessentially destroyed the kulaks as a class, 

and also brought about the slaughter of millions of farm animals that these peasants would rather kill 

than give up to the gigantic farms”. Ратьковский, И.С., Ходяков, М.В. История советской России

СПб.: Искусство, 2001, Гл. 3. 

39

 



Karnensky, A. Art in the Twighlight of the totalitarism. Spb.: Kukshino, 2007, p.25.

 

40



 

Ibid. p.29.

 


 

 

42 



Certainly we can name a few exceptions (for instance some historical compositions, 

portraits,  landscapes  of  masters  such  as  Petr  Konchalovski,  Pavel  Korini,  Sara 

Lebedeva,  Vera  Mukhina,  Robert  Falk  and  Vladimir  Favorsk).  It  would  be  fair  to 

define these artists as being engaged on a spiritual quest, which was totally distinct 

from  the  program  asserted  by  Communist  politicians.  Their  work  was  the  sincere 

manifestation of reality which preserved the true historical moment in decades. 

The  Soviet  population  was  filled  with  hope  when  the  War  was  almost  over.  The 

society aspired that Russian people would find a new moral strength from the victory 

over Germans and that this consequently would lead to the restoration of some of 

artistic and personal freedoms suppressed during the 1930s. At first this hope seemed 

justified. Returning to 1944, when the Soviet troops advanced on Berlin, new works by 

Russian composers Shostakovich and Prokofiev were widely introduced; poets such 

as Boris Pasternak and Anna Akhmatova could officially and openly read previously 

unpublished works; meanwhile at exhibitions appear some of the forgotten Russian 

artistic heritage, from icon painting to masterpieces of the Silver Age (1890-1910ss). 

The majority of Russian society believed that a turning-point in spiritual and cultural 

life had become a reality. 

Unfortunately,  this  hope  turned  out  to  be  an  illusion.  The  totalitarian  system  which 

had been established over more than thirty years had just taken a pause during the 

war;  after  the  victory  over  the  Germans  the  Communist  party  showed  its  true 

dictator’s  face  once  more.  It  almost  uncomprehensive  that  in  a  country 

overwhelmed with poverty, destruction and starvation, so much attention was paid 

to  cultural  and  artistic  questions,  but  Soviet  government’s  alertness  was  a  fact. 

Between  1946  and  1948  the  Party  issued  one  unforgettable  decree  after  another 

concerning  music,  theatre  cinema  and  literature

41

.  In  1949  it  initiated  the  struggle 



against  cosmopolitanism,  smacking  of  anti-Semitism.  These  decrees,  and  the 

speeches  and  press  commentaries  which  accompanied  them,  had  an  especially 

reactive  nature  and  were  phrased  in  crude  military  terms.  This  aggressive  anti-

intellectual  campaign  is  often  defined  as  the  zhdanovshchina,  after  Andrei 

Zhdanov,  secretary  of  the  Central  Committee  of  the  Party  and  Stalin's  closest 

confidant  on  ideological  questions,  who  was  in  charge  of  the  issue

42

.  This  period 



shone  with  falsity.  Soviet  artists  were  required  to  produce  optimistic  works,  rich  in 

                                                 

41

 

Блюм, А.В. “Блокадная тема в цензурной блокаде”. Нева журнал, СПб., № 1, 2004, С. 238-245.



 

42

 



Сталин и космополитизм.

 

Постановление политбюро ЦК ВКП(б) о цензуре информации из СССР, M.: Фонд 



Александра Яковлева, 1946, C.2-4.

 


 

 

43 



enthusiasm  and  heroics  thinking,  full  of  the  praises  of  blossoming  socialist 

construction

43

. Such bragging connected directly with everyday reality in a state on 



the  threshold  of  starvation  and  despair,  but  none  the  less  it  was  expected  from 

artists. If in the post-revolutionary period when many artists and the society sincerely 

believed  in  a  brighter  future,  -  enthusiasm  was  often  a  sincere  belief,  now  after 

facing  the  difficulties  of  the  post  war  situation  viewers  perceived  such  images  as 

mockery, insult and fake. 

Everything  linked  to  bourgeois  society  was  subjected  to  official  attack,  as  well  as 

anything  concerning  human  values  or  novel  views  on  beauty  or  the  origins  of 

spirituality, whether in a foreign or domestic context. Any criticism of Soviet society, 

even  the  most  harmless,  was  a  subject  to  a  direct  criticism  and  censorship.  In 

Zhdanov´s  decree  On  the  Magazines  Zvezda  and  Leningrad  he  spoke  about 

traditions of the early twentieth century in Russian literature, especially he mentioned 

the  work  of  Akhmatova,  and  anathematized  the  brilliant  anti-philistine  satire  of 

Mikhail Zoschenko as rotten and corrupting

44



Fine art escaped disorders but the declarations made about it were dear enough. 

At the congress of Soviet musicians in January 1948, Zhdanov said: “Not so long ago 

the Academy of Arts was set up. As you know, stone tint there were strong bourgeois 

influences  in  painting  which  appeared  everywhere  under  a  leftist  banner  and 

tagged  themselves  with  names  such  as  Futurism,  Cubism  and  Modernism:  they 

overthrew  rotten  academicism  and  voted  for  novelty.  This  novelty  manifested:  lf 

infinites depictions of girls with one head and forty legs. How did it all end? With the 

complete collapse of this new movement. The Party reflected the significance of the 

classical heritage of Bruni, Bryullov, Vereshchagin, Vasnetsov and Surikov”.

 

45



 

Accordingly,  the  idea  was  clearly  stated.  Any  kind  of  novelty  in  art  was 

unequivocally rejected and classicism was imposed as a staple doctrine. Imitation, 

both of renowned Russian artists of the nineteenth century and of pseudo-academic 

movements and styles were encouraged

46



                                                 

43

 



Блюм, А.В. 

 

Советская цензура в эпоху тотального террора. 1929—1953.  СПб.: Академический проект, 

2000, C. 283.

 

44

 



Жданов,

 А.


 Постановление ЦК ВКП, доклад  а с осуждением Ахматовой и Зощенко. О журналах: Звезда и 

Ленинград, Август, 1946, C.4-9.

 

45

 Келдыш, Ю.В. Музыкальная энциклопедия. М.: Советская энциклопедия, 1974.C.23. 



46

 Горяева, Т.М. История советской политической цензуры. Документы и комментарии. М.: 

Российская политическая энциклопедия (РОССПЭН), 1997, C.15-21. 


 

 

44 



However  it  would  be  wrong  to  consider  that  artists  in  the  1940s  and  1950s  worked 

only  on  imitation  and  society’s  entertainment.  The  reality  suggested  more  options: 

Soviet post-war art created a world of myth according to an elaborated plan. The 

approved works of art of this period gave a picture of life which was invented by the 

Party and had nothing in common with reality. Artists were required to depict Soviet 

reality  in  a  glorifying  context,  worshiping  greatness  of  its  time

47

.  The  required  and 



imposed world-view was, to say the least, one-sided, but it was accepted by nearly 

the  majority  of  artists

48

.  Certainly  the  works  of  this  time  had  their  own  special 



aesthetic value and should not be all strictly attributed to the socially commissioned

however the existing exceptions just outlined the rule. 



The Thaw. First steps to liberty. The Nonconformist Art. 

There  were  a  significant  number  of  artistic  groups  and  movements  which  actively 

positioned them-selves in the Soviet Union after the period of the Thaw

49

. It appears 



to  be  challenging  to  classify  this  category  of  artists  since  they  often  were  rather 

defined  by  their  geographical  proximity  than  due  to  their  stylistic  objectives. 

Furthermore,  participation  in  these  groups  was  fluid  as  the  community  of 

nonconformist  artists

50

  in  Moscow  and  Leningrad  was  relatively  small  and  even-



keeled. 

Lianozovskaya  School  in  Moscow  represents  a  group  of  Russian  poets  and  artists 

which  was  formed  in  the  end  of  1950s.  Its  spiritual  leader  especially  at  its  starting 

point  was  an  artist  and  a  poet  Evgenii  Kropivnitsky.  The  artistic  group  consisted  of 

following personalities: Valentina Kropivnitskaia, Evgenii Kropivnitsky, Olga Potapova, 

                                                 

47

 ZhdanovA. Sovetskaya Literatura samaya ideinaia. Moscow: Academic project,1953, p.65. 



48

 This tendence can be followed at the All-Union and whatever exhibitions in the period between 1948-

52ss: A Toast to the Hem of Socialist Labor, Congratulations to the Heroine, 7e Cotton-Growers 'Award 

Ceremony. Was taken the official Decree on Awards, Awarding the Lenin Prize to the Kirov Factory.  At 

the  Industrial  space,  such  as  Triumphant  reamer  was  obvious  the  abundance  of  the  cuIt  ideas 

introduced.  Precisely  in  these  works  artists  create  images  of  a  dream-land,  kind  of  social  sovietic 

paradice which will become true if soviet citizens will be faithful sons of their native land. See Graham, 

Loren R., Stites, Richard. Red Star: The First Bolshevik Utopia. L.: Bloomington, 1984. 

49

 The period of Nikita Khrushiov’s governing between 1953 and 1964 is officially defined as the period of 



Thaw, due to the fact that a significant number of political prisoners were liberated from Russian prisons 

and concentrated camps, in addition the censorship politics was significally softened. Despite of all 

took place the aggressive anitreligious campaign, which resulted into a demolition of thousands of 

churches and monasteries, regardless of their architectural value:  Хрущёв, С.НПенсионер союзного 



значения. M.: Новости, 1991, С.416.

 

50



 By a notion of Nonconformist artists Russian critics usually refer to all underground  and alternative 

movements, societies, individuals of Soviet artists who in the period of 1950 -1980ss were officially 

unaccepted and neglected  by the State’s censorchip and were prohibited to take part in official 

social exhibitions and events. See Михнов

-Войтенко, Евгений. M.: Новый музей, 2010; Андреева, Е.Ю. 

Угол несоответствия. Школы нонконформизма. Москва–Ленинград 1946–1991. M.: Искусство XXI 

век, 2012, C.21-25.

 


 

 

45 



Oskar  Rabin,  Valery  Klever  from  St.  Petersburg,  Lev  Kropivnitsky,  Lydia  Masterkova, 

Vladimir  Nemukhin,  Nikolai  Vechtomov,  together  with  the  following  poets:  Genrikh 

Sapgir, Vladimir Nekrasov and Igor Kholin. The artists mostly lived and worked in the 

small  village  at  the  outskirts  of  Moscow;  traditionally  on  Sundays  they  used  to 

organize exhibitions where everybody could exhibit their art pieces. At those shows 

public discussed art, used to read poetry. Poets, literature critics, cinema producers 

took  part  in  the  discussions.  Those  meetings  faced  an  aggressive  criticism  in  the 

official  periodicals.  In  1963  E.  Kropivnitsky  was  fired  from  the  Moscow  Artist’s  Union 

being  condemned  for  formalism  in  his  works,  but  the  true  reason  was  an 

organization of Liantsevo group. It happened after the official Khrushiov’s visit of the 

Moscow artistic show in Maneg

51

.  



 

 

        



 

E. Kropivnitsky, Expulsion from paradise, 1956, oil on canvas, 80 x 67. 

I. Kabakov, Rank, 1969, oil on canvas, 56 x 76. 

 

A  shared  search  for  a  new  sociocultural  identity  united  artists  and  poets  of 



Lianozovskaya school, however it was not linked to aesthetic concerns, but rather to 

general  worldview,  which  was  far from being  politicized. Curiously,  the  Lyantsovo’s 

group  members  were  not  attracted  by  social  problems.  As  to  poets  –  they  were 

interested  in  issues  concerning  only  poetics.  In  1959  appeared  an  independent 

magazine Syntacsis, its authors had previously agreed not to treat political problems 

and issues. Meanwhile the censorship regarded  their activities as a political action, 

since  its  members  aimed  to  escape  the  state’s  control.  Analysing  their  works,  a 

public  will  not  find  any  hint  on  social  criticism.  Their  main  subject  of  interest  was 

                                                 

51

 



Талочкин, Л.П., Алпатова, И.Г.  Другое искусство: Москва 1956—1976. Московская коллекция, 

Сост. Т.1, М.: Художественная галерея 1991, С.28-32.

 


 

 

46 



aesthetics and anti-aesthetics. As to the chosen issues of their creative work – they 

did not correspond to the official culture. In poet’s Cholin book  Barrack’s residents 

we find the whole epos of a marginal life

52



Generally  artists  of  the  Lianozovskaya  School  worked  in  abstract  style.  Grace  to  a 

slight liberalization in Thaw period of 1960s new Soviet artists rediscovered historical 

Russian  and  international  avant-garde  traditions.  Officially  artists  belonged  to  the 

Moscow  Union  of  Artists,  working  in  the  applied  and  graphic  arts.  None  of  public 

open exhibitions could be hold if it was not organized by the State’s Artist’s Union. No 

wonder  that  unofficial  exhibitions  and  so called  literary  salons  were  hold in  private 

apartments.  Every  time  it  gathered  more  and  more  participants  and  visitors. 

Meanwhile Soviet officials made everything possible to harass the artists and poets. 

In response to the brave artistic gesture of the Lyantsovskaya school members, who 

organized an open air exhibition in 1974, offering participation to all nonconformist 

artists  despite  of  the  law’s  contradiction;  -  State’s  administration  demolished  the 

show by bulldozers and water cannons. This historical event remained known as the 



Bulldozer Exhibition

53



 

      


 

E. Bulatov,



 Krasikov Street, 1977, oil on canvas, 150 x 200. 

M. Shemiakin, Peter the I, 1970s, bronze. 

 

                                                 



52

 Холин, Игорь. Жители барака. М.: Прометей, 1989, C.38-72. 

53

 Лианозовская группа. Истоки и судьбы. М.: Сборник материалов и каталог выставки в 



Государственной Третьяковской галерее, 1998, C.7-19.

 


 

 

47 



In the end of 1960s a number of Moscovian artists that had studios in the district of 

Sretensky  Boulevard  decided  to  create  a  like-minded  artistic  group  which  they 

called  the  Sretensky  Boulevard.  Following  artists  took  part  in  this  association:  Ilya 

Kabakov,  Erik  Bulatov,  Viktor  Pivovarov,  Ülo  Sooster,  Eduard  Shteinberg,  Oleg 

Vassiliev,  Vladimir  Yankilevsky,  and  Ernst  Neizvestny.  As  it  became  traditional in  the 

Soviet  reality  nonconformist  artists  used  their  studios  as  unofficial  venues  of 

exhibitions  and  artistic  discussions.  The  Union  of  Moscow  Graphic  Artists  was  an 

official representative institution to which belonged Sretensky Boulevard’s artists and 

which provided them with studios and work commissions in a field of book illustration 

and  graphic  design.  Besides  a  range  of  the  commissioned  works,  the  artists  had 

enough  of  free  time  to  create  works  based  on  their  personal  creative  searches

54

.  



The  Sretensky  Boulevard  group  had  in  common  the  same  geographical  proximity 

rather  than  similar  artistic  principles  or  styles.  The  main  trait  which  united  them 

besides the studio’s proximity was an opposition to the official art and a hard work 

on a conceptual and abstract art, hold in secret from the official institutions

55

.  


The  majority  of  artistic  groups,  associations  of  the  nonconformist  art  were  closely 

interwoven  one  with  each  other.  So,  no  wonder  that  many  of  the  artists  of  the  



Sretensky  Boulevard  also  belonged  to  the  Moscow  Conceptualist  School.  The 

opposition  to  the  government  was  the  principle  idea  of  this  movement’s 

appearance  in  the  1970s.  Russian  artists  urged  to  express  their  proper  creative 

identity which differed from the officially imposed.  

Contemporary  Russian  artists  suffered  to  be  able  and  create  works  on  subjects 

which  were  especially  interesting  to  them  such  as  the  quotidian,  an  everyday  life. 

Accordingly, in our days the late Soviet reality is sincerely and most fully mirrored in 

artworks  of  conceptualists,  elaborated  in  a  proper  aesthetic  language.  Viewer 

discovers different moods in their works which without purpose criticize a surrounding 

reality: nostalgic, sad, disinterested, quietness.  



The  Moscow  Conceptualist  School  and  group  consisted  mostly  of  Ilya  Kabakov, 

Komar, Erik Bulatov, Oleg Vassiliev and Melamid, Andrei Monastyrsky; however it also 

                                                 

54

 Salomon, Andrew.



 The Irony Tower. Советские художники во времена гласности. M.: Art marginum 

press, 2013, pp.35-57. 

 

 

 





Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   31


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling