Limited Liability Company


Download 0.75 Mb.

bet1/18
Sana06.12.2017
Hajmi0.75 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18

 

 
     
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Limited Liability Company 
«NAMO»
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
1. 
  Introduction 

1.1. 
  Aim, scope and structure of the report 

1.2. 
  Water PEER in the context of the water sector and the PFM reforms 

1.2.1.    Context 

1.2.2.    Water 

1.2.3.    Public expenditure 

1.3. 
  Methodology and data issues 

1.3.1.    Data sources 
10 
1.3.2.    PEER challenges and information gaps 
10 
 
ф 
 
2.   
Public Finance Management in the water sector 
12 
2.1. 
  Setting the stage 
12 
2.1.1.   
Macroeconomic and fiscal policy context, national planning and budgeting 
links 
12 
2.1.2.    Water related expenditure 
14 
2.1.3.    High level Public Expenditure overview 
16 
2.1.4.    Budgetary processes, budget classification and budgeted information in 
Tajikistan 
17 
2.1.5.    PFM in Tajikistan, progress and future directions on on-going reforms 
25 
2.1.6.    Public Exenditures Reviews – relevant finding from World Bank studies 
35 
2.2.   
Developing MTEF for the water sector – analysis and recommendations 
34 
 
 
 
3.   
Public Expenditures in the Water Resource Management sub sector 
40 
3.1. 
  Overview of subsector objectives, policies, programs and agencies 
40 
3.1.1.   
Institutional and policy framework for WRM 
40 
3.1.2.    Legal and institutional basis for WRM in Tajikistan 
41 
3.1.3.    WRM in Tajikistan – challenging transition 
42 
3.1.4.    Water sector objectives 
42 
3.1.5.    Organizations/Agencies involved in WRM and links to Budgeting 
45 
3.1.6.    Policy implementation in WRM 
47 
3.1.7.    Water sector policies and programs 
53 
3.1.8.    Climate change – Impact on the water sector 
54 
3.1.9.    WRM Sector performance 
56 
3.2.   
Principles of IWRM and Proposed Institutions at basins and sub-basins 
58 
3.2.1.    River basin council (rbc) 
59 
3.2.2.    River basin organization (rbo) 
59 
3.3.   
Public expenditures, budget allocation, execution and evaluation 
62 
3.4.   
Sub-sector findings and financial sustainability analysis 
64 
3.5.   
Conclusions and recommendations 
65 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Executive summary 
Public Finance Management in the water sector 
Public Expenditures in the Water Resource Management sub sector 

 
 
 
 
4.   
Irrigation and drainage 
68 
4.1. 
  Overview of sub sector objectives, policies, programs and agencies 
68 
4.1.1.   
Sector objectives 
68 
4.1.2.    Sector policies and programs 
69 
4.1.3.    Sector agencies 
69 
4.2.   
Sub sector performance 
72 
4.2.1.    Overview 
72 
4.2.2.    Impact of weak irrigation systems 
73 
4.2.3.    Investment needs 
74 
4.2.4.    Funding sources 
75 
4.3.   
Process of budget allocation, execution control and evaluation in the sub 
sector 
77 
4.4.   
Analysis of public expenditures in the sub sector 
78 
4.4.1.    Ministry of Finance data 
78 
4.4.2.    Overall funding according to ALRI 
81 
4.4.3.    Tariffs and costs 
83 
4.4.4.    User fees 
85 
4.4.5.    Debts 
87 
4.4.6.    Tax 
88 
4.4.7.    Capital expenditure 
88 
4.4.8.    ALRI expenditure 
90 
4.5.   
Sub sector findings and financial sustainability analysis 
91 
4.6.   
Conclusions and recommendations 
91 
 
 
5.   
Review of Public Expenditures in the Drinking Water Sub-sector 
94 
5.1. 
  Overview of sub-sector objectives, policies, programs and agencies 
94 
5.2. 
  Subsector performance 
99 
5.2.1.   
Access to Water 
100 
5.2.2.    Operations 
101 
5.2.3.    Quality of water 
105 
5.3.   
Process of budget allocation, execution control and evaluation in the sub 
sector 
106 
5.4.   
Analysis of public expenditures in the WSS sub-sector 
107 
5.4.1.    Housing and Communal management, environment and forestry 
107 
5.4.2.    Water supply and Sanitation (WSS) subsector 
110 
5.5.   
Sub-sector findings and financial sustainability 
119 
5.6.   
Conclusions and recommendations 
120 
 
 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Irrigation and drainage 
Review of Public Expenditures in the Drinking Water Sub-sector 
Conclusions 

 
 
 
Annex 1. 
Characteristics of the main glaciers of Tajikistan 
130 
Annex 2. 
Characteristics of the biggest rivers of Tajikistan 
131 
Annex 3. 
Rivers Streamflow data for the years 1960-1999 
132 
Annex 4. 
Characteristics of the main lakes of Tajikistan 
133 
Annex 5. 
Characteristics of the main water reservoirs 
134 
Annex 6. 
The use of water from water reservoirs (in mln. м3) 
134 
Annex 7. 
Predicted approved operational reserves of groundwater 
134 
Annex 8. 
The territorial distribution of groundwater reserves, thousand. 
м3/day 
135 
Annex 9. 
The list of enterprises subordinated to the Ministry of Energy and 
Water Resources System of the Republic of Tajikistan 
135 
Annex 9.1. 
The list of the State unitary enterprises operating in the oil and gas 
industry subordinated by the Ministry and funded partly from budget 
and partly from their commercial activity 
135 
Annex 9.2. 
the list of enterprises, land reclamation and irrigation Agency under 
the government of the republic of Tajikistan 
136 
Annex 9.3. 
List of Non-profit organizations in the system of ALRI 
136 
Annex 9.4.  
The list of non-profit and commercial organizations to Committee for 
Environmental Protection System of the Government of the Republic 
of Tajikistan 
136 
Annex 9.5. 
The list of units of the Main Geology Management System of the 
Government of the Republic of Tajikistan 
137 
Annex 9.6. 
List of joint stock companies, state enterprises, organizations and 
institutions, under the management of Open Joint Stock Holding 
Company "Barki Tojik" 
137 
Annex 10. 
List of counterparts met during conducting the WPEER 
138 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Annexes 

 
 
ACU 
Aid Coordination Unit   
ALRI 
Agency on Land Reclamation and Irrigation 
CoEP 
Committee on Environmental Protection 
CPI 
Consumer Price Index 
CSIP 
Centralised State Investment Programme (domestic capital expenditure) 
DCC 
Development Coordination Committee 
DFID 
Department for International Development (UK) 
DRS 
District of Republican Subordination 
EBRD 
European Bank for Reconstruction and Development 
ENRM 
Environmental and Natural Resources Management 
FMIS 
Financial Management Information System 
GBAO 
Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Oblast 
GFS 
Government Finance Statistics 
GWP  
Global Water Partnership  
ID 
Irrigation and Drainage 
IPSAS 
International Public Sector Accounting Standards 
JSC 
Joint Stock Company 
KBO 
Key Budgetary Organisation 
KMK 
Khojagii Manziliyu Kommunali 
KUSD 
Kilo USD (thousand USD) 
LSIS 
Living Standards Improvement Strategy 
MABA 
Main Administrator of Budget Allocation 
MEWR 
Ministry of Energy and Water Resources 
MEDT 
Ministry of Economic Development and Trade 
MTEF 
Medium Term Expenditure Framework 
NDS 
National Development Strategy 
NDS 
National Development Strategy 
PARS 
Public Administration Reform Strategy 
PEFA 
Public Expenditure and Financial Assessment 
PEER  
Public Environmental Expenditure Review 
PER 
Public Expenditure Review 
PFM 
Public Finance Management 
PFMRS 
Public Finance Management Reform Strategy 
PIP 
Public Investment Programme (externally financed capital expenditure) 
PPER 
Programmatic Public Expenditure Review 
PRS 
Poverty Reduction Strategy 
SDG 
Sustainable Development Goals 
SUE 
State Unitary Enterprise 
TPSFRS 
Tajikistan Public Sector Financial Reporting Standards 
TSA 
Treasury Single Account 
WRM 
Water Resources Management 
WSS 
Water Supply and Sanitation 
WUA 
Water User Association 
 
 
List of Acronyms 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

This report
1
 provides findings from a Public Environmental Expenditure Review (PEER) of the water sector 
in Tajikistan.  The review has focused on the two main aspects of water usage in the country – water supply 
and sanitation (WSS) and irrigation and drainage. PEER aimed to identify financing sources as well as the 
institutional  structures  through  which  funds  are  disbursed.  In  addition,  the  review  looks  at  the  wider 
context of public financial management and Water Resources Management (WRM) and the institutional 
framework for this. 
This is an opportune time for the PEER in Tajikistan for a number of reasons. The sector is embarking on 
a  new  reform  programme,  which  was  approved  in  2015,  which  is  going  to  bring  about  a  fundamental 
change in the approach to water management with the introduction of IWRM. In addition, water features 
in the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the country has just launched its second National 
Development Strategy.  
Social and economic conditions in Tajikistan (and Central Asia) are more closely related to water than in 
other locations. The country is situated (along with Kyrgyzstan) on the upper reaches of the major rivers 
Syr Darya and Amu Darya, rivers which are used downstream by Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. 
Transboundary water  resource  management  is  significant  for  the  geopolitics  of  the  region. Tajikistan  is 
water-rich and this has shaped economic development with extensive hydropower resources (with some 
exports and plans to significantly expand) as well as economic reliance on water intensive agricultural crops 
(wheat and cotton) and water/energy intensive aluminum smelting. Despite having access to extensive 
water resources, the country faces numerous challenges
Climate change poses a significant threat to the region and may reduce supplies in water Tajikistan with 
potential adverse impacts on supplies for farming, WSS and hydropower. Melting of the country’s glaciers 
as a result of global warming could lead to a catastrophic decline in water availability in many Central Asian 
rivers, affecting the water flow, with implications for water for agriculture and household consumption as 
well as energy production. 
The  country  has  been  through  a  number  of  reforms  to  improve  public  financial  management  (PFM). 
These  include  strategies  to  strengthen  coordination  in  national  planning  and  to  link  broader  strategies 
more  closely  to  financial  practices  to  increase  the  efficiency  of  the  management  of  public  finances.  
Ongoing  initiatives  include  the  ten-year  Public  Administration  Reform  Strategy  (PARS)  and  the  Public 
Finance Management Reform Strategy. In January 2014, new budgetary classifications were introduced. A 
further Public Finance Management Modernization Project was approved in 2015 to continue reforms to 
2021. In 2012 the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) was introduced in six pilot sectors. 
There has been some (slow) improvement as a result of these reforms. There is a stronger budgetary 
process in terms of clarity and comprehensiveness of the preparation of budget submissions. Significant 
improvements have been noted in disclosure. PFM planning approaches have improved. Audits have been 
introduced and systems have become automated. However, a number of limitations have been reported. 
Budget transparency, while improved, is still low. Budgetary planning is heavily centralized. Coordination 
across different budget elements is weak. Sizeable amounts of funding are disbursed outside the formal 
budget. Weak staff capacity is exacerbated by low wages leading to high staff turnover. There is little but 
somewhat improving connection between policy based budgeting and expenditure and the achievement 
of tangible improvements in public service provision.  
 
                                                 
1
 This report was prepared by the Dushanbe-based think-tank «Namo» (
www.namo.tj
). The team included Kate Bayliss, Matin 
Kholmatov, Rustam Aminjanov and Farrukh Sultanov. Substantial contributions were made by Anatoly Kholmatov and Takhmina 
Azizova (UNDP). The team expresses its special appreciation to all the Tajik ministries and agencies and development partners who 
has contributed to the Report.  
Executive summary 

 

 
The institutional structure for Water Resources Management (WRM), has also been through a number 
of transitions since independence. In 2013 the MEWR was established to consolidate responsibility for 
water and energy in a single ministry.  This is the agency with ultimate responsibility for WRM. The 
government agency responsible for irrigation and drainage in rural areas is ALRI and for drinking water, 
SUE KMK. In addition, a number of technical agencies operate in the sector including the Committee 
for Environmental Protection (CEP), the Department of Hydrology and the Anti-Monopoly Agency.  
ALRI and KMK both operate across the country with subdivisions at the local level but report directly to 
government  rather  than  the  MEWR.  KMK  has  only  recently  taken  over  rural  WSS.  The  chains  of 
responsibility and of finance reach from the central government agencies through to regional to local 
levels. These government agencies also interact with central and local government authorities which are 
also involved in financing all of which highlights the complexity of sector governance and financing.  
In  2015  a  major  restructuring  of  the  sector  was  approved  to  shift  towards  river  basin  based  water 
management. The country is in the process of establishing local governance structures in each of four 
river basins across the country. These will be governed by River Basin Organisations (RBOs) that will 
coordinate plans for water consumption and monitor water distribution and quality and the long term 
protection of the water resources. The RBOs will also develop plans for infrastructure to protect against 
environmental degradation.  Water users and stakeholders in the geographical area of the specific basin 
will be represented by River Basin Councils that will make representations to the RBOs. It is assumed 
that  donors  will  fund,  at  least  initially,  operations  of  the  RBOs  yet  mid  to  long-term  financial 
sustainability and their role in public expenditures is yet to be clearly articulated.  
Agriculture is the largest consumer of water by far, accounting for over 90% of water use in Tajikistan. 
Some 25 years since independence, socio economic life in rural areas is still is heavily influenced by the 
structures created in the Soviet era. Farm privatization has led to the creation of over 85,000 dehqan 
small  farms with  over 80% of  these  located  in Khatlon province.  However  mostly  irrigation  relies  on 
large-scale systems built in the 1930-1980 period. These now need to be shared by hundreds of small 
scale farmers. The aging infrastructure is in urgent need of rehabilitation and replacement. Poor land 
irrigation  and  drainage  is  a  major  constraint  to  agricultural  production  and  has  reduced  the  area  of 
agricultural  production.  Lack  of  drainage  is  leading  to  salinization  and  land  degradation  as  the  fields 
become water logged. Around one third of irrigated arable land is not used because of the deterioration 
of infrastructure. The future of agriculture, as one of the main sources of growth and employment in 
Tajikistan  would  heavily  depend  on  more  attention  to  irrigation  and  drainage,  if  Tajikistan  is  to  fully 
capitalize on a growing global demand for food.  
ALRI is the government agency responsible for providing irrigation and drainage and there are local as 
well as central divisions across the country. ALRI is responsible for infrastructure up to the level of the 
dehqan  farm.  Thereafter  the  infrastructure  is  the  responsibility  of  the  farmers  through  Water  User 
Associations  (WUAs)  made  up  of  the  farmers.  In  practice  the  WUA  system  has  not  yet  been  fully 
successful with only around one fifth of the country’s 258 WUAs across the country recognized as viable.  
This weak institutional structure at the farm level has created challenges, for example, with lack of clarity 
as to ownership of the infrastructure.  
Government  spending  for  irrigation  and  drainage  comes  predominantly  from  the  central  republican 
budget with only a small proportion from local budgets. Funding has increased steadily since 2007 with 
2014  showing  a  drop  in  state  budget  and  an  increase  in  the  local  budget.  Capital  expenditure  for 
irrigation  through  the  PIP  has  been  fairly  constant  over  the  past  ten  years. While donor  funding  has 
increased  through  the  PIP  it  is  still  only  about  12%  of  sector  expenditure.  Irrigation  and  drainage 
accounts for less than 1% of the state budget.  Although most farms are situated in Khatlon, this region 
accounts for only about 20% of the Republican budget spending on irrigation and drainage with DRS 
attracting the largest share of funding. 
Executive summary 

 

 
ALRI also receives income from user fees paid by the WUAs and this makes up the majority of ALRI 
income, although this share has declined from a peak of 85% in 2008 to around 60% in 2015 which has 
been matched with an increase in republican budget funding. However, user fee collection rates are 
variable. The national average was around 69% in 2015 but this ranged from a peak of 98% in GBAO to 
49% in Khatlon (Kulyab). Low collections rates would appear to indicate that there is scope for improved 
governance  and  enforcement  of  fee  collection,  increasing  fee  income  but  high  debts  have  been 
accumulating with growing levels of unpaid water bills. Debts owed to ALRI by WUAs were written off 
in 2014 but are increasing again already. Meanwhile, the debts owed by ALRI are also growing. The main 
creditors  of  ALRI  are  OSJH  Barki  Tojik  for  supply  of  electricity,  the  State  Budget  for  taxes,  Social 
Protection Fund for 25% of salary taxes and staff personnel for salary. 
The majority of spending by ALRI is devoted to employment costs which accounts for over 70% of 
expenditure. The wage bill has increased and the number of employees has fallen substantially since 
2009, pushing up the average annual wage from TJS 1,592 to TJS 3,536 (US$ 450) but still this is very low 
at little more than US$ 1/day. Despite extensive labour shedding which reduced the workforce by about 
one  third,  and  low  wages,  still,  employment  costs  account  for  the  major  part  of  expenditure.  This 
suggests, first, that ALRI may face difficulties in retaining skilled staff and, second, that there are not 
sufficient funds to address the major financing needs of the sector.  


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling