Linda Branagan, Columbia Diane Brown, Westminster Drenda Collins, Clarksville Linda Decker, Highland


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  • Linda Branagan, Columbia Diane Brown, Westminster

  • Drenda Collins, Clarksville Linda Decker, Highland

  • Michelle Domangue, Columbia Aylene Kovensky Gard, Columbia

  • Leslie Gilbert, Mt. Airy Corliss Glennon, Dayton

  • Pat Greenwald, Sykesville Joyce Halasz, Ellicott City

  • Jane Hayes, Clarksville Jerry Kissel, Ellicott City

  • Paul Kojzar, Ellicott City Chris McComas, Woodbine

  • Holly McFarland, Columbia Shelley McNeal, Clarksville

  • Ron Newmister, Dayton Barbara Nibali, Ellicott City

  • Rosemary Noble, Ellicott City Sylvia Rampini-Huestis, Columbia

  • Jo Ann Russo, Sykesville Paul Rutter, Elkridge

  • Carolyn Taggart, Columbia Louisa Rogoff Thompson, Columbia

  • Barbara White, Ellicott City Jan Marie Williams-Nguyen, Columbia

  • Lisa Wingate, Ellicott City



Member of the Solanum lycopersicum (nightshade) family

  • Member of the Solanum lycopersicum (nightshade) family

  • Other members: peppers, potatoes, tobacco, & eggplants

  • Tomato leaves, stems, & green fruit contain a glycoalkaloid



Tomatoes flourish in (1) good, well-drained soil and require a (2) minimum of 8-10 hours of direct sunlight and (3) approximately an inch of water a week or 6 gallons/week.

  • Tomatoes flourish in (1) good, well-drained soil and require a (2) minimum of 8-10 hours of direct sunlight and (3) approximately an inch of water a week or 6 gallons/week.



“Add compost, compost,

  • “Add compost, compost,

  • and more compost. I use

  • leaves, grass clippings,

  • and kitchen scraps to

  • make it. I incorporate it

  • into the garden bed after

  • it has finished aging

  • (3 to 6 months).”



Containers can solve problems, such as bad soil & high-rise living, but requirements for the plants remain the same

  • Containers can solve problems, such as bad soil & high-rise living, but requirements for the plants remain the same





When soil temperature reaches 55 to 60 degrees

  • When soil temperature reaches 55 to 60 degrees

  • Here, usually mid-May to 1st week of June

  • Can plant earlier if plants are protected

  • If planted early, plants may grow slowly & be subject to insect & disease attacks

  • But choice plant varieties may not be available then at retailers, so buy & hold



Chose small sturdy transplants, 5 to 6 weeks old, no taller than 6 inches

  • Chose small sturdy transplants, 5 to 6 weeks old, no taller than 6 inches

  • Plant on cloudy, wind-free day – or late afternoon

  • Remove leaves except top-2-3 inches

  • Dig shallow trench a little deeper than the root ball, lay tomato on its side turning up the top of the tomato

  • Plastic mulch will warm soil, otherwise do not mulch with organic mulch until soil warms

  • If May is cool, protect with milk jugs, bottom and lid removed





Videos

  • Videos

    • www.extension.umd.edu
    • Click on Youtube button
    • Search HGIC playlist for tomatoes
  • Publications

    • www.extension.umd.edu/hgic
    • Click on “Information Library”, “Publications” and “Vegetable, Fruit and Herb Gardening”
    • See HG 56 – IPM Series - Tomatoes






TOMATOES (* = hybrid variety)

  • TOMATOES (* = hybrid variety)

  • Red: Better Boy*, Big Beef*, Big Boy*, Celebrity*, Delicious, Early Girl*, Jet Star*, Mortgage Lifter, Park’s Whopper*, Red Pear, Rutgers, Stupice, Supersonic*

  • Pink/purple: Cherokee Purple, Eva Purple Ball, German Johnson, Giant Belgian, Pink Brandywine, Pruden’s Purple

  • Yellow: Golden Queen, Lemon Boy, Yellow Pear

  • Paste: Amish Paste, Roma, San Marzano, San Remo, Super Italian, Viva Italia*

  • Cherry: Gardener’s Delight, Sun Cherry, Sun Gold, Sweet 100*, Sweet Cherry, Sweet Million



Early: Early Girl* (* = hybrid variety)

  • Early: Early Girl* (* = hybrid variety)

  • Red cherry: Sweet 100*

  • Orange cherry: Sun Gold*

  • Small red: Juliet*

  • Large red: Celebrity*, Better Boy*, & Supersteak*

  • Heirloom: Brandywine

  • Paste: San Marzano

  • Small yellow: Yellow Plum/Pear

  • Large orange: Kellogg’s Breakfast



Determinate (or bush or patio) varieties grow to the pre-determined height of the cultivar. Though plants may be short, they can produce fruit all summer. This type is great for containers and small gardens.

  • Determinate (or bush or patio) varieties grow to the pre-determined height of the cultivar. Though plants may be short, they can produce fruit all summer. This type is great for containers and small gardens.

  • Indeterminate varieties produce fruit at intervals along their ever-growing stems , with blooms and fruit in all stages of development – until frost kills the plant.



























4 common problems:

  • 4 common problems:

  • Damping off

  • Blossom-end rot

  • Leaves die, beginning near soil

  • “Bugs” attack





Generally it’s an early-season problem that “naturally goes away”

  • Generally it’s an early-season problem that “naturally goes away”

  • Remove affected fruit as soon as possible

  • Add handful of ground limestone to planting soil

  • Mulch to conserve moisture

  • Drip irrigate deeply 1 to 2 gallons/plant per week

  • Establish pH of 6.3 to 6.8 after soil test*



Mulch and drip irrigate to prevent soil splashing onto leaves

  • Mulch and drip irrigate to prevent soil splashing onto leaves

  • Prune lower 12”+ of leaves as plants grow

  • If disease is severe, spray with a fixed copper fungicide to slow or stop disease

  • No cultivars have genetic resistance, though some are more susceptible than others

  • Ignore: Generally late season before plant adversely affected

  • Rotate location of tomato patch

  • Remove all debris after season





Aphids: Predators & parasites, such as lady beetles & small wasps, generally control. Or blast them off with your watering hose.

  • Aphids: Predators & parasites, such as lady beetles & small wasps, generally control. Or blast them off with your watering hose.

  • Whiteflies: Predators and parasites usually control. Or use insecticidal soap, pyrethrum, or a combination, as directed on the label.

  • Hornworms: Hand pick and squish underfoot or drown in jar of soapy water. Or use them as fish bait.

  • Warning: Toxic sprays that kill the “bad guys” generally kill the “good guys” too.









Look for short, stocky plants with dark-green leaves

  • Look for short, stocky plants with dark-green leaves

  • Avoid plants that evidence disease (yellow leaves) or damage (lack of water)

  • Check label for resistance to diseases & pests (VFN…)

  • Check label (or catalogs) to see if variety is determinate or indeterminate

  • Shop when new plants have arrived, probably just before the weekend







Home and Garden Information Center (HGIC)

  • Home and Garden Information Center (HGIC)

    • 800-342-2507
    • http://extension.umd.edu/hgic
  • Grow-It-Eat-It website

    • http://extension.umd.edu/growit
  • Master Gardener state website

    • http://extension.umd.edu/mg









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