May 19, 2017 Mr. Frank Sakuma, coo irl council Via Email


Download 106.43 Kb.

Sana03.09.2018
Hajmi106.43 Kb.

 

May 19, 2017 

Mr. Frank Sakuma, COO 

IRL Council 

 

Via Email 



 

Dear IRL Council, 

Please accept this letter as my endorsement of the City of Satellite Beach

s application for the Desoto 



Parkway  Drainage  Basin  Enhancement  Project.  The  associated  funding  request  of  committing  to 

matching  funds  is  financially  acceptable  and  the  calculations  used  to  determine  these  figures  have 

been thoroughly reviewed by City staff.  This project falls in line with the current direction and forward 

focus  of  the  City  of  Satellite  Beach  sustainability  initiatives,  focusing  on  climate  change  and,  more 

specifically, the impacts of sea level rise. The City has created a Sustainability Action Plan outlining the 

City’s future sustainability

-based endeavors for both residents and the municipality itself over the  next 

25  years.  This  project  will  help  the  City  to  achieve  parts  of  this  action  plan,  mainly  by  supporting  the 

plan



s  Complete  Streets  initiative  while  also  addressing  the  impacts  of  sea  level  rise.  In  addition,  the 



project  will  also  allow  City  staff  to  collect  data  about  the  absorption  rate  of  nutrients  in  bio  retention 

swales. This data will in turn help to create a measurable impact from planting and revegetating public 

and private areas in the City in the future.  

Work  to  be  completed  for  this  project  will  be  led  by  the 

City’s 

Environmental  Programs  Coordinator, 



Nicholas F. Sanzone. He will design and implement the project via the direction of Allen Potter, Director 

of Public Works with assistance from their staff  and David King, the 

City’s

 Engineer. Mr. Sanzone will 



create and conduct workshops and community outreach programs to recruit volunteers for the turn dirt 

portion  of  the  project  where  volunteers  and  staff  will  create  and  plant  bio  retention  swales  and  plant 

vegetation along the shorelines of retention ponds in the Desoto Parkway drainage basin. 

Sustainability  is  a  key  focus  for  the  City  of  Satellite  Beach. We  as  a  City  take  pride  in  protecting  our 

natural  environment.  Environmental  integrity  is  vital  to  the  success  of  our  City  as  a  whole  and  our 

residents.  We  look  to  protect  our  future  while  optimizing  our  present  to  secure  a  sustainable  social, 

economic,  and  environmental  future for  our  island  city. We  are  committed  to  proactive  action  and  we 

hope this project could one day be a part of that necessary and vital action.  

Sincerely, 

 

Courtney H. Barker, City Manager 



 

CITY OF SATELLITE BEACH, FLORIDA 

 

565 Cassia Boulevard 



Satellite Beach, FL  32937 

(321) 773-4407 

FAX: (321) 779-1388                                                                                                                                     

INCORPORATED 1957

 

 


Executive summary:  

IRLNEP Proposal, May 2017  

 

Project Title:  Desoto Parkway Drainage Basin Stormwater Enhancement Project 



Project Applicant:  

City of Satellite Beach, Nicholas Sanzone, Environmental Programs Coordinator   

Partners: 

Dr. John Trefry/F.I.T; Balance for Earth 

 

 

 



Amount of Request:  $33,000 ($35,000 match) 

Other Funding Sources and Amount of Total Match: 

Project Description Narrative: The goal of this project is to increase the effectiveness of the 

City’s 


current stormwater system by implementing a Water Quality Restoration and Habitat Restoration 

Project to protect the Indian River Lagoon (IRL) from stormwater. This will be accomplished by 

installing vegetated stormwater bio retention swales and planting vegetation along the shorelines of 

retention ponds. The residence time of stormwater will be increased, allowing stormwater and nutrients 

to be absorbed by the soil and vegetation. This would help to reduce nutrient content by allowing 

stormwater to slowly percolate into the soil profile and into existing City stormwater infrastructure that is 

already in place. The four primary pieces stormwater 

infrastructure already in place in the City are ponds, weirs, 

ditches, and exfiltration pipes. 

Project Location: (Latitude and Longitude): 

near 28 09’ 

59.79’’ N and 80 35’ 41.70 W

  

CCMP Action Plans addressed by project: FSD-1, FSD-



2,FSD-4,FSD-6,FSD-9,FSD-10,FSD-11,W-6,W-7 

Project Outputs (Deliverables) and Outcomes:  

  11,500 sqft planted  



  10,000 spartina grasses planted 

  500 mangroves planted  



  Increase in the residency time of stormwater 

  Significant decrease in the nutrient content and 



total suspended solids entering the IRL 

  Water quality monitoring pre/post 



  3 educational videos 

  Construct 3 educational signs about the project   



  10,000 educational door hangers 

  Conduct 6 work days  



  Promote at 4 city events 

  Conduct 3 workshops 



  Create online links to existing material  

NEP Core Elements addressed by proposal (list):  

  Outreach and public involvement 



  Assessment and reporting 

  All Ecosystem Restoration and Protection Projects Core Elements 



 

Project Boundary Map:  

Figure 1. City of Satellite Beach Desoto Parkway 

Drainage Basin, 28 09’ 59.79’’ N and 80 35’ 41.70 W 

 

• IRL Location Map:  



 

Section 1 



 Title Page 

 

1.



 

Project Title:  Desoto Parkway Drainage Basin Stormwater Enhancement Project



 

2.

  CCMP Action Plans implemented by this project include the following: FSD-1, FSD-2,FSD-



4,FSD-6,FSD-9,FSD-10,FSD-11,W-6,W-7 

3.

  Applicants: 



Nicholas Frank Sanzone

, Environmental Programs Coordinator, The City of 

Satellite Beach Florida, 565 Cassia Boulevard Satellite Beach, FL  32937 Tel:  321.773.4407 

Fax:  321.779.1388 Website:  E-mail: 

nsanzone@satellitebeach.org

 

Section 2 





 Project Specifics 

A.  Project Goals and Objectives 

The current stormwater infrastructure of ditches, ponds and weirs in the 296-acre Desoto Parkway 

drainage basin filters approximately 389 million gallons of water per year. During large rain events 

stormwater flows into ditches, weirs and ponds through exfiltration pipes that lead into the lagoon. 

By installing vegetated stormwater bio retention swales and planting vegetation along the 

shorelines of the retention ponds, the residence time of stormwater will increase, allowing 

stormwater and nutrients to be absorbed by the soil and vegetation. This will reduce nutrient 

content by allowing stormwater to slowly percolate into the soil profile and into existing stormwater 

infrastructure. The goal of this project is to increase the effectiveness of the 



City’s 

current 

stormwater system by implementing a Water Quality Restoration and Habitat Restoration 

Project to protect the IRL from stormwater. This long-term project goal will be reached by 

completing 3 main deliverables.   

1.  Short-term (1-3 year): Reduce sediments and excess nutrients that enter the IRL. This will be 

done by creating 8,500 sqft of vegetated bio swales and planting 3,000 sqft of pond shoreline to 

manage runoff using the Department of Environmental Protections (DEP) design, found at 

http://www.dep.state.fl.us/water/nonpoint/docs/nonpoint/sts.pdf

. The swales will be planted with 

a minimum of 10 different species of native plants including a minimum of 10,000 Spartina 

grasses to help achieve the desired effect. The planting of the swales along the ditches will 

include a minimum of 500 mangroves, in addition to other native plants. An example of plants 

and plant costs can be seen in Table 1. Planting will take place in March and April of 2018. This 

will ensure that the plants are established and rooted by the rainy season in May and June, 

reducing the potential for washout, increasing the likelihood of success.  

 

2.  Short-term (1-3 year)/Long-term (5+ years): Slow the flow and reduce the volume of water 



entering the lagoon during storm events. This will be done by enacting the enhancements 

previously discussed. This best management practice (BMP) increases the residency time of 

stormwater before it enters the lagoon. This 296-acre area receives an annual rainfall of 48.29 

inches per year, accommodating approximately 389 million gallons of water per year that enters 

into the 

City’s 


stormwater system. The swales will be dug between .5-1 feet deep and 3-6 feet 

wide when possible. They will be able to accommodate a minimum of 21,563 gallons of water.  

Removing that amount from the stormwater system will increase the amount of water that 

percolates down into the ground instead of running off into the IRL, accomplishing this objective.  

Water quality data will be collected to determine the effectiveness of the planting. 

 

3.  Short-term (1-3 year)/Long-term (5+ years): Educational components that engage the public 



include: City meetings, educational workshops, work days, three produced videos and online 

material. Educational outreach will also be conducted with signage at three locations that 

explain the project. Each sign will have links to 

related information posted on the City’s website, 



including a page devoted to stormwater education and specifically this projects components (i.e. 

swales and shorelines). The three videos, created by the nonprofit Balance For Earth, will 

engage the public to recruit volunteers, showcase the project, summarize important components 

of the project, inform residents on how they can create stormwater swales on their property, and 

will finally help to communicate data collected by the project. Lastly, 10,000 informational door 

hangers will be created and distributed to the public at City events, workshops, and at City Hall.  

 

4.  Upon completion maintenance of the project sites will fall to City public works crews. The plants 



used to vegetate the stormwater swales will become a living resource as an additional seed 

source for the City that can be used to propagate additional plants that would be used to replace 

any plants if necessary used initially in the project and to vegetate other areas within the City. 

This will increase the longevity of the project by utilizing the plants in the stormwater swales as 

effective tools to propagate future vegetation to be used as replacement plants, which is the 

fourth and final objective. This project has a high likelihood for success because of its simplistic 

design and the proven fact that swales with native plants absorb and retain more nutrients and 

water than areas without them.  

B. Technical Merit/Justification  

The project area, located near 

28 09’ 59.79’’ N and 80 35’ 41.70 W

, is 296 acres and currently 

vegetated with large trees and grass. This area was selected for improvements to the stormwater 

system because of the high volume of water that enters into the stormwater system at this location. 

This location has room for improvement around stormwater entry points and along the two main 

ditches, weirs, culverts, exfiltration pipes and three ponds that feed water into the stormwater 

system. The 296-acre Desoto Parkway drainage basin filters approximately 389 million gallons of 

water per year into the IRL. When large amounts of water flood into an area, the velocity of water 

increases, carrying sediment and nutrients with it as it moves into the stormwater system, which is 

designed to remove water from roadways. The creation of a vegetative buffer in the form of swales 

would enhance the existing stormwater infrastructure. The areas inside of the swales will allow for a 

minimum of 21,563 gallons of stormwater retention, where sediments can fall out of suspension from 

the stormwater and excess nutrients (specifically nitrogen and phosphorous that contribute to 

nutrient loading and algae blooms in the IRL) can be absorbed by the soil and vegetation. The 

locations shown in Figure 1 in the Executive Summary will be where the stormwater swales will be 

created to enhance the existing stormwater infrastructure. Current estimations of nutrient loading are 

from the City of Satellite Beach

s South Patrick Drive TMDL study, modified in 2013, as shown in 



Table 2.  Water quality sampling before and after the installation of the swales and vegetated 

shoreline will determine project effectiveness. 

This project will be led by the City’s Environmental 

Programs Coordinator in coordination with Public Works who have an excellent record when 

completing projects of this nature on time and on or under budget. To better ensure this, a project 

timeline has been created and is available in Table 3

C. Benefit(s) to the IRL  

Benefits to the IRL will be immediate and long-term, focusing on BMP`s of reducing the residency 

time of stormwater entering the lagoon and absorbing and reducing nutrients by increasing the 

vegetative biomass available by planting swales. Additional components include: creating habitat for 

wildlife and educating Satellite Beach residents and others 

about the project via the City’s website. 

With DEP approval, the City will post a link to the City`s website that connects to existing stormwater 

education and specifically the benefits of swales that is available as a PDF on the DEP website. The 

estimated reduction in excess nutrients and total suspended solids is 1-5%. This will be determined 

by water quality sampling. To measure the success of this process two pre and four post project 



water quality sampling days will be conducted at two out flow sites, at least half of the sampling days 

will take place after a rain event. Sampling will be conducted by Dr. John Trefry of the Florida 

Institute of Technology (FIT). Dr. Trefry and his team will collect measurements for: conductivity, 

temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen. Discrete samples will also be taken for: alkalinity, turbidity, 

total suspended solids (TSS in mg/L), dissolved NO

3

-



-NO

2

-



, NH

4

+



, HPO

4

3-



, organic C (DOC), TN, TP, 

Fe, Cl


-

, SO


4

2-

, and Ca



2+

 as well as particulate Fe, Al, Si, N, P, Ca, and C (POC).

     

D. Local Commitment  



This project is an extension and enhancement to the existing Stormwater Master Plan 2001 and the 

Stormwater Quality Master Plan 2011 that is available online at the City

s website at



 

http://www.satellitebeachfl.org/departments/public_works/stormwater.php

  

E. Project Readiness  



This project can be classified as a simple 

turn dirt



 project. It requires no permitting and the basic 

design outline is complete. There are also no contracts to bid/award. The project will begin in 

February 2018 following approval and will be completed in April 2018. Tentative milestone dates for 

this project include: promoting the project online via the City

s website and Facebook page as well as 



in print in the bimonthly City newsletter and conducting outreach to schools and other groups 

through the first week of February, organizing volunteers and conducting a workshop for potential 

volunteers by the second week February, ordering plants in the first week of March, mapping, 

flagging, and outlining the locations of where each plant will be planted by the second week of 

March, promoting the project again online via the City

s website and Facebook page as well as in 



print in the bimonthly City newsletter through the third week of March, and finally planting the plants 

with City staff and volunteers through the last week of March and into the first week of April at 

planting events.  

F. Project Monitoring/Evaluation and Maintenance Plans  

The water quality aspect of this project will be monitored by Dr. John Trefry. To measure the success 

of this process, two pre and four post project water quality sampling days will be conducted at two 

out flow sites. At least half of the sampling days will take place after a rain event. The sampling will 

be conducted by Dr. John Trefry under benefits.

 

This project will also be monitored by the 



Environmental Programs Coordinator on a weekly basis. Annually, plant survival will be measured 

with a goal of having a 75% or better survival rate for all planted vegetation. T

he City’s 

Public Works 

crews will water the newly planted plants twice weekly unless excess rains make watering 

unnecessary. Once planted, the plants will be allowed to go to seed. The seeds will be collected and 

propagated at the City’s shade house

. Additional plants propagated will be used to replace the plants 

initially planted for the project. This will allow the project to become sustainable beyond grant 

funding. 

 

G. Citizen/Volunteer Engagement and Outreach Components  



As part of this project, the C

ity will create a new volunteer program called “Satellite Stewards”, where 

citizens will be engaged and volunteers will be gathered to promote sustainability and stewardship. 

The project will use the following outreach components: online media through the City

s website, on 



Facebook, in print in the City

’s 


bimonthly newsletter, through outreach to local schools and other 

environmental groups, and through public workshops. Volunteers will be directly engaged through in 

the planting of native plants that will be used for the project. There will be a brief synopsis of how 

and where to plant the plants before each of the planting event days. Through the afore mentioned 

types of promotion and via educational signage about stormwater that will be installed onsite at three 


separate locations, the public will be made aware of the benefits of the project and how they as 

individuals can expand upon it by implementing similar practices on their own properties. To 

determine the outcome of this change in behavior and to show who has made changes that will 

benefit the IRL, the City will track the anticipated percent increase in residential properties within 

Satellite Beach that are able to be selected for the Lagoon Friendly Lawns Program that currently 

exists as a partnership between the City and Keep Brevard Beautiful, using the current number of 

Lagoon Friendly Lawns as a baseline. In addition to these engagement components 10,000 door 

hangers will be created to be distributed at public events, workshops, and at City Hall. The door 

hangers will have information pertaining to the project and stormwater impacts and how swales are 

beneficial to the environment. Three videos created by Balance For Earth will be used to engage the 

public about the project, recruit volunteers, showcase the project and educate on swales, and 

communicate project results after project completion. The success of this educational component will 

be measured by the number of online views. 

 

H. Experience and Past Performance  



I, the City of Satellite Beach Environmental Programs Coordinator, Nicholas F. Sanzone, have 5 

years of experience coordinating restoration projects and leading volunteers along the IRL. I have 

planted thousands of mangroves and Spartina grasses with groups of up to 100 volunteers, both at 

the Blowing Rocks Preserve for the Nature Conservancy and at the Port Canaveral for the Marine 

Resources Council. Using the Port Canaveral project as an example, I coordinated with local schools 

and have held workshops to educate volunteers about the techniques to be used during planting 

events. The projects I have implemented did not receive funding from the NEP or IRL License plate 

fund. All projects were privately funded. This project is for TMDL enhancement of existing 

stormwater infrastructure that addresses sea level rise by reducing the impacts of stormwater, 

specifically from large storm events. 

 

Project Funding  

A. Partnership and Cost Sharing 

 

This project will be undertaken by the City of Satellite Beach. At this time project partners include Dr. 



John Trefry and his team from FIT, who will be collecting the water quality monitoring data. During 

the volunteer recruiting stage of the project, outreach will be conducted to entities and organizations 

that have partnered to provide volunteers in the past. The list of organizations includes: Keep 

Brevard Beautiful, Surfrider, and the Marine Resources Council. Sources of matching $15,000 worth 

of funds will be obtained from 200 volunteers working in support of the project. Documentation will 

include: volunteer waivers and sign in sheets that will document the total number of volunteer hours. 

$6,000 will be obtained from the water quality work conducted by Dr. John Trefry and his team from 

FIT. Lastly, Balance For Earth will donate one of their three educational videos as match, valued at 

$600. The reminder of the match will be a direct cost paid for by the City in the form equipment use 

and maintenance and a total of over 400 City staff hours spent on creating and implementing all 

aspects the project.  

$33,000 Requested Grant Funds   

$35,000 Match Funds  

$15,000 Value of In-kind Match (volunteer labor time is $22.14/hr.) 

Match as percentage of Total Project Costs = 51.5%  

 


B. Project budget including in-kind and cash match amounts and source of all funds.  

 

 



B.  Funding for projects under this RFP do not consist of IRL Council Member contributions.  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Task Line 

Item 


Task Description

IRL Funding Amount 

Cost Share Funding 

Amount 


Cost Share Funding 

Source (cash or in-

kind)

1

Project Design



$0 

$2,000 


Satellite Beach

2

Plants



$0 

$2,000 


Satellite Beach

3

Plants



$30,000 

$0 


NEP

4

Installation 



$0 

$2,200 


Satellite Beach

5

Maintenance



$0 

$3,000 


Satellite Beach

6

Volunteer hrs/ 



coordination

$0 


$15,000 

Satellite Beach

7

Education



$3,000 

$1,800 


Satellite 

Beach/Balance For 

Earth/NEP

8

Monitoring



$0 

$8,000 


F.I.T./Satellite Beach

9

Reporting



$1,000 

Satellite Beach

Summary Cost

$33,000 


$35,000 

Project Costs

$68,000 


Appendix 

Table 1. Plant List 

 

Table 2. South Patrick Drive Treatment Calculations 



BMP 

Existing TP 

Load (lb/yr) 

Existing TN 

Load (lb/yr) 

Existing TSS Load 

(lb/yr) 

Baffle Box #1 

94.72 

645.82 


9111.47 

Baffle Box #2 

14.50 

42.23 


1726.51 

 

 



 

 

Total 



109.22 

688.05 

10837.97 

 

 

Table 3: Timeline 

Tasks 

2018 


2019 

Jan-


Feb 

March-


July 

August-


Dec 

Jan-


Mar 

Mar-


July 

August-


Dec 

1.Project design 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

2. Pre-planting sampling 



 X 

  

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

3. Volunteer outreach / project promotion 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

4. Educational materials created 



 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

5.Planting of swales and shorelines 



 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

6.Sampling and analysis 



 

 

 



 

 X 




7.Educational videos and online material 

 

 



  

 



 

 

 



  

8.Data interpretation, report preparation 

 

 

 



 

 



 

 

 



9.Maintenance 

 

 

 



 



 



Type

Size

Cost

Number Total Cost

Dune sunflower (Helianthus debilis)      

ln4

1.15

16

$18.40 

Red Mangrove

7g

45

1

$45.00 

Coontie Palm (Zamia pumila)        

1g

3.39

4

$13.56 

Railroad vine (Ipomoea pes-caprae)             

ln2

0.55

8

$4.40 

Horsemint Spotted Beebalm (Monarda 

punctata)

1g

2.1

8

$16.80 

Blanket Flower (Gaillardia pulchella)          

ln2

1.1

32

$35.20 

Marsh Hay Cordgrass (Spartina patens)

1g

1.65

4

$6.60 

Purple Lovegrass (Eragrostis spectabilis)

1g

1.8

4

$7.20 

Salt Grass (Distichlis spicata)



ln4

1.25

4

$5.00 

Smooth Cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora)

1n4

1.1

8

$8.80 

Sea OatsUniola (paniculata)

1g

2.1

4

$8.40 

Sand Cordgrass (Spartina bakeri)

1g

1.8

4

$7.20 

Golden Tickseed (Coreopsis tinctoria)

ln2

0.55

4

$2.20 

Seaside Goldenrod (Solidago sempervirens) ln2

0.75

4

$3.00 

Swamp Fern (Blechnum serrulatum)

1g

2.3

8

$18.40 

Royal Fern (Osmunda regalis)

1g

2.7

4

$10.80 

Butterfly Milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa)

1g

2.4

16

$38.40 

Beach Morning (GloryIpomoea imperati)

ln4

1.4

4

$5.60 

Beach Elder (Iva imbricata)

ln4

0.55

4

$2.20 

Sea Oxeye Daisy (Borrichia frutescens)

ln4

0.75

16

$12.00 

Total Item Cost

 

 

 

$270 

Plants


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling