Moiseyev Dance Company New York Times


Download 78.87 Kb.

Sana11.03.2018
Hajmi78.87 Kb.

 

NEW

 

YORK

 

|

 

LOS

 

ANGELES  

 

 



Moiseyev Dance Company 

New York Times 



 November 3, 2007 



Igor Moiseyev, 101, Choreographer, Dies  

By JACK ANDERSON 

Igor Moiseyev, the master choreographer who created a new form of theatrical folk dance in Russia and 

whose  troupe  was  one  of  the  most  popular  dance  companies  of  the  20th  century,  died  yesterday  in 

Moscow. He was 101. 

 His  death,  at a  hospital  where  he had  been  unconscious for  three  days,  was  announced  by  the  troupe’s 

director,  Yelena  Shcherbakova,  the  ITAR-Tass  news  agency  reported.  The  Kremlin  said  that  President 

Vladimir V. Putin expressed condolences. 

The  Moiseyev  Dance  Company’s  energy,  virtuosity,  precision  and  ingenious  distillation  of  folk  styles 

from many lands set audiences cheering worldwide. When the troupe made its New York debut in 1958, 

presented by the impresario Sol Hurok at the Metropolitan Opera House, it became the first major Soviet 

dance  group  to  perform  in  the  United  States.  The  visit  helped  usher  in  a  new  era  of  cultural  exchange, 

formalized that year by an agreement signed by the United States and the Soviet Union.  

John  Martin, the  dance critic  of The  New  York  Times,  pronounced  the  New  York  debut  “stupendous.” 

And Ed Sullivan gave the troupe national exposure during the same trip, presenting the dancers for a full 

hour on his television variety show, “Toast of the Town” (later renamed “The Ed Sullivan Show”).  

Although Mr. Moiseyev’s choreography derived from folk sources, he created his works for professional 

dancers: as observers noted from the start, no peasants or villagers ever danced with such theatrical flair.  

“Moiseyev is an astute folklorist and a good artist,” Mr. Martin wrote in 1958. “His company, 100 strong, 

is warm, vital, vivacious, remarkably trained, energetic beyond belief, and above all performers deluxe.” 

Igor Aleksandrovich Moiseyev (pronounced moy-SAY-yeff) was born in Kiev, Ukraine, in 1906, the only 

child  of  a  Russian lawyer and  a  French-Romanian  seamstress.  His  family  lived  in  Paris  until  he  was 8, 

and throughout his life he spoke to Western journalists in fluent French.  

After the family returned to Russia he studied ballet privately in Moscow, then entered the Bolshoi Ballet 

School  in  1921.  From  1924  to  1939  he  was  a  member  of  the  Bolshoi,  sympathetic  to  the  efforts  of 

innovative Soviet choreographers of the 1920s and ’30s. 

He  developed  his  own  interest  in  choreography,  and  his  early  ballets  —  among  them  “The  Footballer” 

(1930), “Salammbô” (1932) and “Three Fat Men” (1935) — were noted for their experimentation, drama 

and characterization.  

In  1936  Mr.  Moiseyev  was  appointed  dance  director  of  the  Moscow  Theater  of  Folk  Art,  from  which 

emerged, a year later, the Soviet Union’s first folk-dance ensemble. The troupe originally included many 

amateurs,  but  it  soon  employed  professionally  trained  dancers.  Officially  known  as  the  State  Academic 

Folk  Dance  Ensemble  of  the  Soviet  Union,  the  troupe  was  usually  billed  in  the  West  simply  as  the 

Moiseyev Dance Company. 

Most of Mr. Moiseyev’s works were inspired by the traditions of the various regions in the Soviet Union. 

But he also created dances with Chinese, Cuban, Sicilian and Argentine themes, and in the early ’60s his 

dancers amused American audiences by performing the Virginia reel and a parody of rock ’n’ roll.  


Moiseyev Dance Company 

New York Times 

 November 3, 2007 



Page 2 of 2

 

 



NEW

 

YORK

 

|

 

LOS

 

ANGELES  

 

Mr. Moiseyev attributed his dancers’ virtuosity and versatility to their training in classical ballet, which 



he described in a 1970 interview as “the grammar of movement.” 

“With ballet technique as a base,” he added, “one can do everything.”  

He continued to work with traditional ballet companies throughout his career. In 1958, he staged his own 

version of “Spartacus” for the Bolshoi Ballet.  

In addition to directing his folk ensemble, from 1967 to 1971 he headed a classical ballet troupe. Among 

its  members  were  Alexander  Filipov  and  Alexander  Godunov,  who  both  later  joined  American  Ballet 

Theater in New York.  

It was always Mr. Moiseyev’s folk dances that brought him international attention and acclaim. A favorite 

with  audiences  everywhere  was  the  dramatic  “Partisans,”  which  was  both  a  tribute  to  Soviet  guerrilla 

fighters in World War II and a technical tour de force that required dancers to imitate the gait of mounted 

soldiers whose “horses” were invisible under their cloaks. 

The  Moiseyev  company  consistently  received  critical acclaim.  Yet  as its  repertory  became  familiar,  the 

pioneering  dancers  of  the  original  troupe  were  replaced  by  younger  performers  more  concerned  with 

technique  than  with  motivating  impulse.  Reviewers  began  to  notice limitations  in  the  troupe’s  aesthetic 

approach. 

As  a  popular  Soviet  cultural  export,  the  Moiseyev  company  was  occasionally  the  target  of  American 

groups  protesting  Soviet  policies.  Most  such  demonstrations  involved  only  picketing,  but  others  turned 

violent.  At  a  Moiseyev  opening  in  September  1986,  Russian  members  of  the  Jewish  Defense  League 

threw a tear gas canister into the audience at the Metropolitan Opera House, sending nearly 4,000 people 

streaming out of the hall.  

Controversies also developed over the ideological content of Mr. Moiseyev’s work. Many Western critics 

found his happy folk to be in line with an accent on the positive required by Socialist Realism. A defender 

of expressive dramatic content in choreography, Mr. Moiseyev reiterated the dominant Soviet aesthetics 

of the cold war period when he deplored abstraction in ballet.  

But Mr. Moiseyev, who refused to join the Communist Party, did more than parrot officially sanctioned 

views. In 1959 he was reprimanded by Soviet authorities for delivering a speech in which he maintained 

that American culture, far from being inherently decadent, was blessed with vigor. In 1967 he ruffled the 

Soviet  authorities  by  asserting  in  a  Pravda  article  that  Soviet  ballet  was  deadened  by  its  preoccupation 

with princes and princesses and its unwillingness to tackle contemporary themes. 

Mr. Moiseyev married the dancer Tamara Zeifert in 1940; she became his choreographic assistant. Other 

members of the company included their daughter, Olga Moiseyeva, and her husband, Boris Petrov. Mr. 

Moiseyev married a second time, and his wife is among his survivors, Ms. Shcherbakova said.  

In poor health in recent years, he was rarely seen in public. But he appeared at a concert in Moscow last 

year to celebrate his 100th birthday. On his centenary, he received the Order of Merit, Russia’s highest 

civilian decoration. He had earlier been named People’s Artist of the U.S.S.R.. His other honors included 

the Dance Magazine Award in the United States, the Lenin Prize and three Stalin Prizes. 

A creatively passionate man, Mr. Moiseyev said in a 1965 interview: “Everything  I’ve done, I love.  If 

you’re  not  in love,  you  can’t  create.  And  if  you’re calm  when  you’ve  created something,  you  can  rest 

assured that you’ve created nothing.”  

 


 

NEW

 

YORK

 

|

 

LOS

 

ANGELES

 

 



Moiseyev Dance Company 

The New York Times 



 January 21, 2006 



A Visionary of Balletic Folk Dance Turns 100 

By A


NNA KISSELGOFF

 

When Igor Moiseyev -- choreographer, genius and innovator -- once told me that ballet technique was essential to 



all professional dancing, he revealed the clue to his creativity.  

With English grammar, he said, you could write like Dickens but also like Hemingway. Similarly, ballet training 

was a movement grammar to be used onstage in different ways.  

Mr.  Moiseyev,  who  celebrates  his  100th  birthday  today  in  Moscow,  chose  to  ''write''  like  Igor  Moiseyev. 

Ostensibly a folk ensemble, the Moiseyev Dance Company, which he founded in 1937 and still directs, is actually 

a ballet-trained group of professional dancers whose focus is on folk material.  

As  the  New  York  Times  dance  critic  John  Martin  shrewdly  wrote  after  the  company's  United  States  debut  in 

1958, ''No folk ever danced like this.''  

And this is true not only because of Mr. Moiseyev's pioneering acrobatic bravura, with men rotating not once but 

twice in barrel turns in the air, or the whirlwind speed of the women, wrapped in their costumes' blur of colors.  

No folk ever danced like this because Mr. Moiseyev, a Bolshoi-trained disciple of the avant-garde choreographer 

Kasyan  Goleizovsky,  turned  his  company  into  his  own  creative  and  artistic  outlet.  Millions  have  thrilled  to  the 

rainbow of brilliant folk traditions that he has cast in a dazzling theatrical light.  

Authentic folk dancing is not a spectator sport. The viewer's impulse is to join in or, if not, to feel excluded. Mr. 

Moiseyev made the raw material theatrical, and in doing so, he extended the art of choreography as a whole.  

That is his major achievement. He has developed the expressive image in dance, and he captures the essence of 

any subject he touches.  

This  is  easiest  to  see  when  Mr.  Moiseyev  departs  from  the  dances  of  the  former  Soviet  Union  and  applies  his 

magic wand to material from abroad, ranging from an intimate distillation of a Chinese opera scene to the vibrant 

mass fireworks of a Spanish jota.  

In cold war times, Mr. Moiseyev ran into trouble for glorifying rock 'n' roll. But those of us who saw his good-

natured spoof on gyrating American teenagers knew that he had been misread. Here again, he had captured the 

ethos of the age, a time of change.  

Obviously it was safer for the Moiseyev Dance Company to end its performances, as it sometimes still does, with 

a hands-across-the-sea American square dance to the tune of ''Turkey in the Straw.''  

There  are  those  for  whom  the  company,  throughout  the  Soviet  era,  was  always  an  instrument  of  Soviet 

propaganda, showing  only  happy  peasants  and  heroic  exploits.  And  yet  last  year  at the  New Jersey  Performing 

Arts Center, the group was still rousing viewers to their feet with some of the same dances and a few new ones. 

For the first time, a Moiseyev Dance Company program featured a work by a guest, the Korean choreographer Pe 

In Su.  


Soviet  propaganda  without  the  Soviet  Union?  If  the  Moiseyev  dances  have  survived,  it  is  because  their  artistic 

quality lifted them above any possible propaganda level.  



Moiseyev Dance Company 

The New York Times 

 January 21, 2006 



page 2 of 2

 

 



NEW

 

YORK

 

|

 

LOS

 

ANGELES

 

Mr. Moiseyev's genius has been for carefully observed detail. In a remarkable passage in ''Perpetuum Mobile,'' a 



1967 Soviet documentary, he becomes exasperated with his dancers and demonstrates stamping steps as he wants 

them  done.  In  1989  in  Moscow  I  saw  the  teenagers  in  his  school  execute  a  breathtaking  series  of  innovative 

exercises at the barre.  

It is useful to remember that Mr. Moiseyev, who was born in Kiev and studied ballet in Moscow as a teenager, 

was in the company of rule-breakers in the 1920's. He was a regular at the literary salon of Anatoly Lunacharsky, 

the dance lover who invited Isadora Duncan to start a school when he was Minister of Enlightenment.  

Goleizovsky,  the  highly  experimental  choreographer  who  was  also  George  Balanchine's  mentor,  cast  Mr. 

Moiseyev in leading roles in his ballets. Later, when Mr. Moiseyev was a choreographer of contemporary ballets, 

his career at the Bolshoi was stopped by a conservative ballet establishment. Fortunately, for us.  

 


 

NEW

 

YORK

 

|

 

LOS

 

ANGELES  

 

 



Moiseyev Dance Company 

The Moscow Times 



 January 20, 2006 



A Step Ahead 

Igor Moiseyev, founder of a world-famous folk dance troupe, celebrates 

his 100

th

 birthday with a gala concert at the Kremlin Palace. 

By 


ALASTAIR GEE

 

At the headquarters of the Ballet Moiseyev in the Tchaikovsky Concert Hall last Monday, frenzied preparations 



were under way for this weekend's gala performances celebrating the 100th birthday of the troupe's founder, Igor 

Moiseyev. 

 

"It's an incredible occasion," said Antonida Marnopolskaya, the manager of the famed ensemble, as dancers 



hurried past her down a hallway to rehearse. "The whole world now knows about him. For us, he is like God." 

 

Born in Kiev in 1906, Moiseyev began his career as a ballet dancer at the Bolshoi at age 18, and by 1930 he was 



working as a choreographer. He soon realized, however, that his ambitions lay in folk dance rather than in the 

classical repertoire. In the 1930s he traveled to each of the republics that then made up the Soviet Union

researching traditional dances, and in 1936 he staged Russia's first-ever festival of folk dance. 

 

He later formed his own company, which performed throughout the war and, in 1945, became the first Soviet 



dance group to travel abroad. Today, the group has approximately 85 dancers and continues to tour 

internationally. 

 

Moiseyev, who turns 100 on Saturday, no longer comes regularly to rehearsals, although his decision on dance-



related matters is still final, and his wife, Irina, a former dancer, plays a major role in managing the troupe.  

 

Due to illness, Moiseyev was unable to be interviewed for this story. But Yelena Shcherbakova, the director of the 



ensemble, reflected on his long career in her office as a large stone bust of Moiseyev peered down over her desk. 

 

"Moiseyev created a new genre in the world of choreography," Shcherbakova said. "He was the first to bring 



popular dance to the professional stage." 

 

The process of adding a new dance to the group's repertoire begins with extensive research into a culture's 



traditions, dress and language. But Moiseyev's goal was not to present ethnographic specimens, Scherbakova said, 

describing his approach as more impressionistic. 

 

"He doesn't take the American square dance and stage it with the ensemble exactly as it is performed in America," 



she said. "He's a choreographer, and having understood the fundamentals of a culture, he then transfers it to his 

own choreography." 

 

Although the company performs the folk dances of countries ranging from Spain to Korea, the core of its 



repertoire comes from the various ethnic groups of the former Soviet Union. On Monday, dancers in large group 

formations practiced one of the group's 300 dances, the "Partisan," a tribute to resistance movements that opposed 

the Nazis in the North Caucasus. Male dancers simulate riding on horseback through the mountains. They are 


Moiseyev Dance Company 

The Moscow Times 

 January 20, 2006 



page 2 of 2

 

 



NEW

 

YORK

 

|

 

LOS

 

ANGELES  

 

later confronted by a girl brandishing a mock machine gun. 



 

Almost all of the troupe's current members graduated from a folk dance school that Moiseyev founded in 1943. 

The school emphasizes acting as well as dancing, and students must do more than just perform a dance 

mechanically. 

 

"In these dances I can show myself," said dancer Nikolai Rubtsev, 22, between rehearsals. "There is no emotion 



in ballet like there is in folk dance. Here, every dancer must tell their own little story." 

 

For Shcherbakova, Moiseyev's genius consists in his ability to see art for the stage where others previously did 



not, and in his ceaseless push to incorporate new forms from around the world. 

 

"He is always half a step ahead," she said. 



 

  

 



 

NEW

 

YORK

 

|

 

LOS

 

ANGELES  

 

 



Moiseyev Dance Company 

The Washington Post 



 January 28, 2006 



A Russian Dancemaster’s Latest Number: 100 

By 


MARIA 

D

ANILOVA



 

MOSCOW  --  He  has  amazed  Americans  with rock-and-roll  and  square  dance.  He  has  infatuated  the  West with 

Russian culture at a time of deep hostility. He has won standing ovations across the globe. 

And he has lived to celebrate his 100th birthday. 

Igor Moiseyev, who turned 100 Jan. 21, transformed folk dance into a legitimate genre for world choreography. 

His  numbers  --  from  the  Russian  peasant  girl  dance  to  the  Greek  sirtaki  --  are  hailed  for  promoting  peace  and 

tolerance by showing that cultures are numerous and each is unique. 

"He was the first man to see that folk dance -- the people's art -- has a lot of rich material that can be made into 

real theater," said Yelena Shcherbakova, director of the Moiseyev Dance Company, who was a dancer for more 

than 20 years. 

Born  in  1906  in  Kiev,  Moiseyev  enrolled in a  dance school  at  age  14  reportedly  because  his  parents  wanted  to 

keep the street-loving adolescent busy. He showed such talent that he was soon transferred to the Bolshoi Theater 

choreography  school  and  became  a  Bolshoi  dancer  in  1924.  However,  he  was  soon  ousted  from  the  classical 

theater for his love of daring experiments and began to choreograph and direct independent performances. 

After staging a series of productions for a Moscow theater studio, Moiseyev toured all 15 republics of the Soviet 

Union  and  in  1937  founded  the  Moiseyev  Dance  Company,  which  he  heads  to  this  day.  The  company's  first 

performance was the groundbreaking "Dances of the Peoples of the USSR," a colorful performance that explored 

the cultures of the numerous ethnic groups of the former Soviet Union. 

Other countries around the world quickly followed suit by founding  their own folk dance companies, which are 

said to have been inspired by Moiseyev. 

"Although he repeatedly refused to join the Communist Party, he was favored by Soviet leaders including dictator 

Joseph Stalin, and his troupe was the first to travel abroad, even before the Bolshoi dancers. 

Moiseyev's company caused a sensation on its first tour in the United States in 1958 with a parody on rock-and-

roll. It was Moiseyev's humorous take on what was then America's most popular dance. Doing parody was a bow 

to Soviet censors, who otherwise were likely to forbid the show, since the dance itself was banned as an element 

of bourgeois Western culture. 

But the American audience loved the performance. "He is the ambassador of peace," Shcherbakova said. 

A  frail  Moiseyev  made  an  appearance  at  a  Moscow  anniversary  concert  in  his  honor  on  Wednesday.  He  was 

accompanied by his wife, Irina, 80, also a former dancer. Two aides walked the beret-topped Moiseyev to his seat

he then struggled to rise to salute an applauding audience. 

 


 

NEW

 

YORK

 

|

 

LOS

 

ANGELES  

 

 



Moiseyev Dance Company 

Los Angeles Times 



 September 19, 2005 



Bowl season closes with Russian salute 

By 


LEWIS SEGAL

 

The music heard on the annual "Fireworks Finale" program at Hollywood Bowl on Friday may have amounted to 



little more than bagatelles, but John Mauceri's concept was fascinating: coupling works by Russian composers 

who visited Los Angeles with works by Russian American composers who lived here while creating film scores. 

 

Adding to this intriguing scherzo à la russe: the Bowl debut of the mighty Moiseyev Dance Company, artists who 



theatricalize folklore just as Khachaturian did in the "Sabre Dance" from the ballet "Gayane" or Franz Waxman 

did in "The Ride of the Cossacks" from the movie epic "Taras Bulba." 

 

The Hollywood Bowl Orchestra played its best in an excerpt from Khachaturian's "Spartacus," though Mauceri's 



conducting here proved less incisive than that offered in recent performances of the complete ballet in Costa 

Mesa. His finest interpretation came in the waltz from Prokofiev's "Cinderella," structurally astute with a 

powerful surge. 

 

Apart from artful solos, Rachmaninoff's "Vocalise" merely plodded along, the march from Prokofiev's "Love for 



Three Oranges" emerged bombastic instead of mock-bombastic, and Mauceri's spoken introduction made 

Shostakovich's arrangement of "Tea for Two" sound far more compelling than the performance itself managed to 

do. 

 

Soundtrack music by Dimitri Tiomkin fared better, especially the central countdown-to-slaughter section of a 



suite from "Dial M for Murder," and the main title from Alfred Newman's score for "How the West Was Won" 

blazed its trail anew in a remarkably fresh rendition. 

 

Mauceri shared conducting duties with the Moiseyev company's Alexander Radzetskiy in a six-part segment 



confirming Igor Moiseyev's brilliance at heightening distinctive movement vocabularies, whether in a trick solo 

("Two Boys in a Fight," danced by Oleg Chernasov) or a complex, large-scale ensemble (the Moldavian suite). 

 

The Bowl video cameras seemed in confused disarray during the Bessarabian Gypsy dance, though this relatively 



intimate piece provided a textbook on Moiseyev methodology: how to build from low-key gestural reality to 

overpowering mass intensity, how to keep showpiece steps rooted in human relationships, how to make dynamics 

(percussive slapping, for instance) focus interest in a piece. 

 

"Polyanka" added stage geometry to the index of Moiseyev's choreographic arsenal, with lines of men (in pastels) 



and women (in primary colors) eventually merging in a big circle, with plenty of flirtation and virtuosity along the 

way. 


 

The opening of Moiseyev's Russian suite offered a disarming gravity before escalating into bravura, but his male 

"Adzharian War Dance" stayed in a dark, assaultive mode throughout, looking like exotic training exercises for a 

cadre of ninjas. Happily, the camera staff rose to the occasion. 

 


Moiseyev Dance Company 

Los Angeles Times 

 September 19, 2005 



page 2 of 2

 

 



NEW

 

YORK

 

|

 

LOS

 

ANGELES  

 

Completing the program: a video segment documenting the Russian version of "Sesame Street" and some very 



noisy incendiary effects credited to Sousa Fireworks.  

 

Document Outline

  • Moiseyev_NYTimes_110307.pdf
  • Moiseyev_NYTimes_012106.pdf
  • Moiseyev_MoscowTimes_012006.pdf
  • MO7B10~1.PDF.pdf
  • Moiseyev_LATimes_091905.pdf


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling