Overweight and Obesity in the Eastern Mediterranean Region


Download 5.37 Mb.

bet48/63
Sana09.02.2017
Hajmi5.37 Mb.
1   ...   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   ...   63

542 

 

 



RESULTS:  Awakening and extubation times were significantly shorter in the 

BIS group (P < 0.05). In the BIS (vs. non BIS) group, there were no significant 

differences  observed  in  the  me  to  obtain  an  Aldrete  score  of  9.  The 

sevoflurane consumption and cost in the BIS group were lower than in the 

non BIS group (P < 0.05). 

CONCLUSION:  Bispectral index monitoring during anesthesia for morbidly 

obese patients provides statistically significant reduction in recovery times. 

It also has the added advantage in decreasing sevoflurane consumption. 

 

Anaesth Intensive Care. 2008 Jan;36(1):69-73. 



Safety  of  Percutaneous  Tracheostomy  in  Obese  Critically 

Ill Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study. 

Aldawood AS, Arabi YM, Haddad S. 

Intensive  Care  Unit,  King  Fahad  Hospital,  King  Abdulaziz  Medical  City, 

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. 



Abstract 

Obesity has been described as a relative contraindication for percutaneous 

tracheostomy.  The  objective  of  our  study  was  to  examine  the  safety  and 

complications  of  percutaneous  tracheostomy  in  obese  patients.  We 

conducted  a  prospective  cohort  study  of  all  consecutive  patients  who 

underwent  percutaneous  tracheostomy  at  a  tertiary  medical-surgical 

intensive  care  unit  between  May  2004  and  October  2005.  We  compared 

percutaneous tracheostomy in obese  pa ents (body mass index  > or =  30 

kg/m2)  to  non-obese  patients.  We  documented  the  occurrence  of  the 

following  complications:  aborting  the  procedure,  accidental  extubation, 

conversion  to  surgical  tracheostomy,  paratracheal  placement,  the 

development  of  pneumothorax,  major  bleeding  (requiring  blood  product 

transfusion  or  surgical  intervention)  or  death.  We  also  documented 

hypoxia,  minor  bleeding  (requiring  pressure  dressing  or  suturing), 

subcutaneous  emphysema  and  transient  hypotension.  During  the  study 

period, 227 percutaneous tracheostomies were performed. There were 50 

percutaneous tracheostomies in the obese group and 177 in the non-obese 

group.  In  45  obese  pa ents,  percutaneous  tracheostomy  was  performed 

without  bronchoscopic  guidance.  Major  complications  were  significantly 

higher  in  obese  pa ents  (12%  vs.  2%,  P  =  0.04),  while  the  rate  of  minor 

complications  was  not  significantly  different  between  the  two  groups. 

There  were  no  instances  of  death  or  pneumothorax,  subcutaneous 

emphysema or need for surgical intervention during or in the postoperative 


543 

 

 



period in either group. Our study suggests that percutaneous tracheostomy 

can be performed safely in the majority of obese patients. 

  

The New Egyptian Journal of Medicine, 38(1), 2008, 34-39 



Planning  for  the  Development  of  Evidence  Based 

Guidelines  for  the  Nutritional  Management  of  Obesity  in 

Saudi Arabia.  

Almajwal, AM, Williams, PG, Batterham, MJ and Alothman, AM, 



Abstract  

OBJECTIVE: To seek agreement from key stakeholders on the main issues, 

considerations  and  key  questions  that  need  to  be  addressed  when 

developing  evidence  based  guidelines  for  nutritional  management  of 

obesity in Saudi Arabia.  



METHODS:  Forty  six  health  professionals  (including,  dietitians,  physicians, 

academics  and  government  representatives)  participated  in  an  invited 

workshop held in Riyadh in June 2007.  

Participants were divided into groups to discuss five topics: priority areas to 

include  in  a  critical  literature  review,  best  formats  for  presentation  of 

guidelines, particular local issues to consider, information to be included in 

appendices,  and  methods  to  encourage  the  adoption  and  use  of  the 

guidelines.  A  questionnaire  was  also  distributed  to  participants  and  they 

were  asked  to  rank  their  level  of  agreement  about  issues  related  to  the 

process of guideline development.  



RESULTS:  Participants  agreed  that  Saudi  clinical  practice  guidelines  are 

necessary  for  dietitians  and  other  health  professionals  to  guide  effective 

nutritional  management  of  obesity.  They  also  agreed  about  the  most 

important  key  questions  that  need  to  be  addressed  in  the  guidelines.  In 

contrast,  there  was  no  general  agreement  about  the  best  formats  of  the 

guidelines and this may be due to the limited use of the guidelines for daily 

practices.  Participants  also  discussed  other  topics  and  their  views  are 

summarized  Conclusion:  The  development  of  specific  clinical  practice 

guidelines  for  nutritional  management  of  obesity  in  Saudi  Arabia  is 

warranted  and  will  be  valued  by  Saudi  dietitians  and  other  health 

professionals.  

 


544 

 

 



Kuwait Medical Journal, 2008;41(4):301-303 

Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Band for Morbid Obesity - 

Local Experience in Al-Ahsa Region of Saudi Arabia 

A R S Almulhim, L Kaman, A I Al-Sultan 

1Department of Surgery and 2Department of Internal Medicine, College of 

Medicine, Al Ahasa, King Faisal University, Hofuf, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:    To  present  our  experience  of  laparoscopic  gastric  banding 

(LAGB) for morbid obesity in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia Design: 

Retrospective  reviews  of  patients  undergoing  surgery  for  morbid  obesity. 

Setting:  King  Fahad  Hospital,  Hofuf,  Saudi  Arabia  Subjects:  One-hundred 

and eighty two (182) pa ents from January 2000 to December 2006 were 

included in the study.  



INTERVENTION:    Laproscopic  gastric  banding  Main  Outcome  Measures: 

Preoperative  age,  sex,  body  mass  index  (BMI),  co-morbidities,  operative 

variables and postoperative hospital stay and complications were recorded. 

The postoperative weight loss was recorded at three monthly intervals.  



RESULTS:  The mean age was 30.3 years (range 18 - 51 years) and the mean 

BMI was 52.6 kg per square meter (range 41 -  61.5 kg per square meter). 

There  were  two  conversions  to  open  procedure  because  of  dense 

adhesions from previous surgeries. The mean opera ve  me was 2.7 hours 

(range 1.25 - 3.5 hours). The mean postopera ve hospital stay was 3.7 days 

(range  2  -  12  days).  There  was  no  mortality.  Three  pa ents  had  band 

removal after one year postopera vely. The mean follow up period was 11 

months (range 3 - 40 months). The mean BMI decreased to 50.2, 45.4, 41.2 

and 37.7 kg per square meter at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months postopera vely, with 

an average excess weight loss reduc on of 43.5% a er one year.  



CONCLUSIONS:    Laproscopic  gastric  banding  is  an  effective  and  safe 

procedure for the treatment of morbid obesity in Saudi patients. 

 

 

 



 

 


545 

 

 



The New Egyptian Journal of Medicine, 2008;38(1):34-39. 

Planning  For  the  Development  of  Evidence  Based 

Guidelines  for  the  Nutritional  Management  of  Obesity  in 

Saudi Arabia  

Ali M. Almajwal, PhD Candidate*; Peter G. Williams, Asso Prof.*; Marijka J. 

Batterham, PhD*; Abdulaziz M. Alothman, Asso Prof.†  

*From University of Wollongong, School of Health Sciences, Australia ,  

†  From  King  Saud  University,  College  of  Applied  Medical  Sciences,  Saudi 

Arabia.  

Correspondence  to:  Ali  Almajwal,  University  of  Wollongong,  School  of 

Health Sciences, Australia, 2522. Email: aalmejwal@hotmail.com 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE: To seek agreement from key stakeholders on the main issues, 

considerations  and  key  questions  that  need  to  be  addressed  when 

developing  evidence  based  guidelines  for  nutritional  management  of 

obesity in Saudi Arabia.  



METHODS:  Forty  six  health  professionals  (including,  dietitians,  physicians, 

academics  and  government  representatives)  participated  in  an  invited 

workshop  held  in  Riyadh  in  June  2007.  Par cipants  were  divided  into 

groups to discuss five topics: priority areas to include in a critical literature 

review, best formats for presentation of guidelines, particular local issues to 

consider,  information  to  be  included  in  appendices,  and  method  to 

encourage the adoption and use of the guidelines. A questionnaire was also 

distributed  to  participants  and  they  were  asked  to  rank  their  level  of 

agreement about issues related to the process of guideline development.  

RESULTS:  Participants  agreed  that  Saudi  clinical  practice  guidelines  are 

necessary  for  dietitians  and  other  health  professionals  to  guide  effective 

nutritional  management  of  obesity.  They  also  agreed  about  the  most 

important  key  questions  that  need  to  be  addressed  in  the  guidelines.  In 

contrast,  there  was  no  general  agreement  about  the  best  formats  of  the 

guidelines and this may be due to the limited use of the guidelines for daily 

practices.  Participants  also  discussed  other  topics  and  their  views  are 

summarized  



CONCLUSION:  The  development  of  specific  clinical  practice  guidelines  for 

nutritional management of obesity in Saudi Arabia is warranted and will be 

valued by Saudi dietitians and other health professionals.  


546 

 

 



 

Saudi Med J. 2007 Dec;28(12):1875-80. 



The  Prevalence  of  Abdominal  Obesity  and  Its  Associated 

Risk  Factors  in  Married,  Non-Pregnant  Women  Born  and 

Living in High Altitude, Southwestern, Saudi Arabia. 

Khalid ME. 

Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, King Khalid University, PO 

Box 641, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. mhkhalid999@yahoo.com 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:    To  determine  the  prevalence  of  abdominal  obesity  and  it's 

associated  risk  factors  in  a  married,  non-pregnant,  high  altitude  female 

population. 

METHODS:  A cross-sec onal study conducted from January to March 2003, 

with  438  currently  married  non-pregnant  women  aged  18-60  years,  born 

and  permanent  residents  in  and  around  Abha,  southwestern  heights, 

Kingdom  of  Saudi  Arabia.  A  questionnaire  describing  the  demographic, 

social,  reproductive,  physical  activity,  and  educational  status  was 

completed.  The  subjects  were  measured  by  weight,  height,  and  waist 

circumference (WC). Body mass index (BMI) was calculated for each woman 

(BMI=weight  [Kg]/height  [m2]).  Abdominal  obesity  was  defined  as 

WC>88cm, and total obesity as BMI > or =30 according to the World Health 

Organization criteria. 



RESULTS:    The  overall  prevalence  of  abdominal  obesity  was  41.1%.  The 

prevalence  was  positively  and  significantly  associated  with  age,  total 

obesity,  and  parity  (p=0.0001  for  all),  nega vely  and  significantly  with 

educa onal  level  (p=0.0001),  and  nega vely  and  insignificantly  with 

strenuous  physical  ac vity  (p=0.9).  Results  of  mul ple  logis c  analyses 

showed that age, total obesity, and educational level were independent risk 

factors for abdominal obesity. 

CONCLUSION:    The  study  highlighted  the  high  prevalence  of  abdominal 

obesity  and  showed  that  in  addition  to  total  obesity,  intra-abdominal  fat 

deposition  is  influenced  by  other  lifestyle  and  reproductive  factors. 

Community health education programs, which provide information on the 

high prevalence of abdominal obesity and its risk factor to all women, will 

be  certainly  justifiable,  and  prevention  strategies  should  be  implemented 

accordingly. 


547 

 

 



 

Saudi Med J. 2007 Oct;28(10):1569-74. 



Prevalence  and  Trends  in  Obesity  among  School  Boys  in 

Central Saudi Arabia between 1988 and 2005. 

Al-Hazzaa HM. 

Exercise  Physiology  Laboratory,  King  Saud  University,  Riyadh,  Kingdom  of 

Saudi Arabia. halhazzaa@hotmail.com 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:  To  determine  the  trends  in  body  fatness  and  obesity  among 

Saudi  primary  schoolboys  using  the  data  from  2  cross-sectional  studies 

conducted in 1988 and 2005. 

METHODS:    Two  sets  of  data  were  analyzed.  The  first  set  (n=1082)  was 

conducted in 1988 and the second (n=702) set was conducted in 2005. Both 

studies  used  multistage  random  samples  involving  primary-school  boys 

aged  6-14  years  from  Riyadh,  Kingdom  of  Saudi  Arabia.  Measurements 

included  weight  (Wt),  height  (Ht),  biacromial  (BA)  and  bi-iliac  (BI)  widths, 

triceps (T), subscapular (S) skinfolds, S/T ratio, body mass index (BMI), body 

fat percentage (fat%), lean body mass (LBM), and the proportion of obese 

boys (fat% > or =25% of Wt). 



RESULTS:  From 1988-2005 there were significant increases in all variables 

except LBM. The lowest changes were observed in body structures (Ht, BA, 

and BI) and the highest were in body fatness (T, S, and fat%). During this 17-

year period, the mean BMI standard devia on increased from 16.5 +/- 2.1 

to 18.0 +/- 4.0 kg/m2 and fat percentage increased from 13.2 +/- 4.7 to 19.7 

+/- 10.0%. In addi on, S/T ra o increased by 13.5%, indica ng shi s toward 

central  obesity  over  time.  However,  the  biggest  increase  was  seen  in  the 

propor on of obese schoolboys (from 3.4% in 1988 to 24.5% in 2005). 



CONCLUSION:  Findings indicate rising trends in BMI, body fatness, central 

obesity, and prevalence of obesity among Saudi schoolboys over the last 2 

decades.  Increased  obesity  prevalence  among  Saudi  children  is  a  major 

public health concern. 

 

 

 



 

 


548 

 

 



Saudi Med J. 2007 Aug;28(8):1191-7. 

Hormonal  Levels  of  Leptin,  Insulin,  Ghrelin,  and 

Neuropeptide  Y  in  Lean,  Overweight,  and  Obese  Saudi 

Females. 

Daghestani MH, Ozand PT, Al-Himadi AR, Al-Odaib AN. 

Department  of  Zoology,  College  of  Science,  King  Saud  University,  Riyadh, 

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:  To studied the relationship that exists between leptin, ghrelin, 

insulin, neuropeptide  Y  (NPY),  anthropometric,  and  metabolic  variables  in 

Saudi females. 

METHODS:  The study was conducted at the Department of Genetics, King 

Faisal  Specialist  Hospital  &  Research  Center,  Riyadh,  Kingdom  of  Saudi 

Arabia from November 2004 to August 2005. One hundred and twenty-two 

Saudi  females  were  divided  into  3  body  mass  index  (BMI)  groups:  lean 

(N=60),  overweight  (N=17),  and  obese  (N=45).  Fas ng  lep n,  ghrelin, 

insulin, NPY and glucose concentrations were determined. 



RESULTS:  Leptin levels in overweight and obese groups were significantly 

higher than those in lean group. Leptin levels showed a positive correlation 

with  BMI  in  obese  (0.81),  overweight  (0.78),  and  lean  (0.48).  In  contrast, 

ghrelin  concentration  decreased  in  obese  and  overweight  subjects 

compared to lean subjects. Ghrelin levels were negatively correlated  with 

BMI in obese (-0.81), overweight (-0.58), and lean subjects (-0.62). Nega ve 

correlations were found between serum insulin and ghrelin concentrations 

in  lean  and  obese  subjects.  Glucose  and  insulin  levels  were  significantly 

higher in the obese group compared to controls. No differences were found 

in serum NPY between the 3 groups. 



CONCLUSION:    Leptin  levels  increased  remarkably  with  increasing  BMI.  A 

leptin  resistance  state  seems  to  exist  in  many  obese  and  overweight 

individuals. Ghrelin concentration was decreased in overweight and obese 

subjects. These data demonstrate a significant inverse relationship between 

ghrelin and leptin levels in overweight and obese subjects. 

 

 



 

549 

 

 



Ann Saudi Med. 2007 Jul-Aug;27(4):241-50. 

Epidemiology,  Clinical  and  Complications  Profile  of 

Diabetes in Saudi Arabia: A Review. 

Elhadd TA, Al-Amoudi AA, Alzahrani AS. 

Department  of  Medicine,  King  Faisal  Specialist  Hospital  and  Research 

Center, Jeddah. tarikelhadd58@gmail.com 



Abstract 

Diabetes  mellitus  is  emerging  as  a  major  public  health  problem  in  Saudi 

Arabia in parallel with the worldwide diabetes pandemic, which is having a 

particular impact upon the Middle East and the third world. This pandemic 

has accompanied the adoption of a modern lifestyle and the abandonment 

of  a  traditional  lifestyle,  with  a  resultant  increase  in  rates  of  obesity  and 

other  chronic  non-communicable  diseases.  The  indigenous  Saudi 

popula on seems to have a special gene c predisposi on to develop type 2 

diabetes, which is further amplified by a rise in obesity rates, a high rate of 

consanguinity and the presence of other variables of the insulin resistance 

syndrome.  We  highlight  the  epidemiology,  clinical  and  complications 

profiles of diabetes in Saudi people. Diabetes is well studied in Saudi Arabia; 

however,  there  seems  to  be  little  research  in  the  area  of  education  and 

health  care  delivery.  This  is  of  paramount  importance  to  offset  the 

perceived  impact  on  health  care  delivery  services,  to  lessen  chronic 

diabetes  complications,  and  to  reduce  the  expected  morbidity  and 

mortality from diabetes. 


550 

 

 



Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2007 Jul 7;6:18. 

Serum  Leptin  And  Its  Relation  to  Anthropometric 

Measures of Obesity in Pre-Diabetic Saudis. 

Al-Daghri NM, Al-Attas OS, Al-Rubeaan K, Mohieldin M, Al-Katari M, Jones 

AF, Kumar S. 

Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, 

Saudi Arabia. aldaghri2000@hotmail.com 

Abstract 

BACKGROUND:    Little  information  is  available  on  leptin  concentrations  in 

individuals  with  IGT.  This  study  aims  to  determine  and  correlate  leptin 

levels to anthropometric measures of obesity in pre-diabetic, (IFG and IGT), 

type 2 diabe c and normoglycaemic Saudis. 



METHODS:  308 adult Saudis (healthy controls n = 80; pre-diabetes n = 86; 

Type  2  diabetes  n  =  142)  par cipated.  Anthropometric  parameters  were 

measured  and  fasting  blood  samples  taken.  Serum  insulin  was  analysed, 

using  a  solid  phase  enzyme  amplified  sensitivity  immunoassay  and  also 

leptin  concentrations,  using  radio-immunoassay.  The  remaining  blood 

parameters were determined using standard laboratory procedures. 



RESULTS:  Leptin levels of diabetic and pre-diabetic men were higher than 

in  normoglycaemic  men  (12.4  [3.2-72]  vs  3.9  [0.8-20.0]  ng/mL,  (median 

[interquar le range], p = 0.0001). In females, lep n levels were significantly 

higher  in  pre-diabetic  subjects  (14.09  [2.8-44.4]  ng/mL)  than  in 

normoglycaemic  subjects  (10.2  [0.25-34.8]  ng/mL)  (p  =  0.046).  A er 

adjustment for BMI and gender, hip circumference was associated with log 

lep n (p = 0.006 with R2 = 0.086) among all subjects. 

CONCLUSION:    Leptin  is  associated  with  measures  of  adiposity,  hip 

circumference in particular, in the non-diabetic state among Saudi subjects. 

The higher leptin level among diabetics and pre-diabetics is not related to 

differences in anthropometric measures of obesity. 



551 

 

 



Saudi Med J. 2007 Jul;28(7):1096-101. 

Growth  Pattern  among  Primary  School  Entrants  in  King 

Abdul-Aziz  Housing  City  for  National  Guard  in  Riyadh, 

Saudi Arabia. 

Al-Rowaily M, Al-Mugbel M, Al-Shammari S, Fayed A. 

Department  of  Family  and  Community  Medicine,  King  Fahad  Hospital  for 

National Guard, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:  To provide information on nutritional status of primary school 

entrants at King Abdul-Aziz Housing City for National Guard in Riyadh, Saudi 

Arabia  and  compare  it  with  national  and  international  studies  of 

anthropometric data on weight and height. 



METHODS:  A cross-sectional study carried out at the School Health Clinic in 

King Abdul-Aziz Housing City for National Guard in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The 

study popula on comprised 6207 children aged 4-8 years from both sexes 

attending  the  obligatory  pre-school  health  examina on  for  years  2003-

2005.  Weight,  height,  and  demographic  data  were  collected  according  to 

international standards and the body mass index (BMI) calculated. The data 

were  computer  analyzed  using  Statistical  Package  for  Social  Sciences  and 

Anthro 2005 and compared to interna onal references. 



RESULTS:    Obesity,  defined  as  BMI<95th  cen le  in  our  popula on  was 

found  to  be  4%,  which  is  less  than  the  na onal  and  interna onal 

references. This also applies to underweight, defined as Weight-for-Height 

Z  score  less  than  -2  SD,  which  was  found  to  be  5.8%.  While  stun ng, 

defined  as  height  Z  score  less  than  -2  SD  was  higher  than  interna onal 

references (5.9%). 




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   ...   63


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling