Overweight and Obesity in the Eastern Mediterranean Region


Download 5.37 Mb.

bet62/63
Sana09.02.2017
Hajmi5.37 Mb.
1   ...   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63
Participants  Residents  of  the  GCC  states  participating  in  studies  on  the 

prevalence  of  overweight  and  obesity,  hyperglycaemia,  hypertension  and 

dyslipidaemia.  

Main  outcome  measures  Prevalences  of  overweight,  obesity  and 

hyperglycaemia, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia.  



RESULTS:  Forty-five  studies  were  included  in  the  review.  Reported 

prevalences of overweight and obesity in adults were 25–50% and 13–50%, 

respectively.  Prevalence  appeared  higher  in  women  and  to  hold  a  non-

linear  association  with  age.  Current  prevalence  of  impaired  glucose 

tolerance was  es mated to  be 10–20%.  Prevalence appears  to have  been 

increasing  in  recent  years.  Estimated  prevalences  of  hypertension  and 

dyslipidaemia were few and used varied definitions of abnormality, making 

review difficult, but these also appeared to be high and increasing,  



CONCLUSIONS: There are high prevalences of risk factors for diabetes and 

diabetic  complications  in  the  GCC  region,  indicative  that  their  current 



690 

 

 



management  is  suboptimal.  Enhanced  management  will  be  critical  if 

escalation of diabetes-related problems is to be averted as industrialization, 

urbanization and changing population demographics continue.  

 

Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes. 2011;4:89-97. Epub 2011 Mar 8. 



Strategy  to  Combat  Obesity  and  to  Promote  Physical 

Activity in Arab Countries. 

Musaiger AO,  Al Hazzaa HM,  Al-Qahtani A,  Elati J,  Ramadan J,  Aboulella 

NA, Mokhtar N, Kilani HA. 

Abstract 

Obesity has become a major public  health problem in the Arab  countries, 

creating  a  health  and  economic  burden  on  these  countries'  government 

services. There is an urgent need to develop a strategy for prevention and 

control  of  obesity.  The  third  Arab  Conference  on  Obesity  and  Physical 

Ac vity was held in Bahrain in January 2010, and proposed the Strategy to 

Combat  Obesity  and  Promote  Physical  Activity  in  Arab  Countries.  This 

strategy provides useful guidelines for each Arab country to prepare its own 

strategy  or  plan  of  action  to  prevent  and  control  obesity.  The  strategy 

focused  on  expected  outcomes,  objectives,  indicators  to  measure  the 

objec ves,  and  ac on  needs  for  9  target  areas:  child-care  centers  for 

preschool  children,  schools,  primary  health  care,  secondary  care,  food 

companies, food preparation institutes, media, public benefit organizations, 

and  the  workplace.  Follow-up  and  future  developments  of  this  strategy 

were also included. 


691 

 

 



Iranian  Journal  of  Endocrinology  &  Metabolism,  lume  13,  Number  2  (8-

20112011, 13(2): 157-164 



The  Comparison  of  Prevalence  of  Diabetes  and 

Hypertension between Rural Areas of Fars and Rural Area 

of EMRO Region 

hossain faramarzi 

P Bagheri



abbas bahrampour

leila halimi 



Abstract 

Introduction:  Since  monitoring  and  evaluation  of  diabetes  and 

hypertension in individuals/the population greatly contribute to improving 

both clinical care and following identification of disease in the region  and 

even  the  country,  and  to  manage  prevent  and  control  diabetes  and 

hypertension and their risk factors, the goal of this study was to compare 

disease status in rural areas of Fars province and  rural areas of the EMRO 

region. 

Materials  and  Methods:  The  current  study  is  a  descriptive-analytic  cross 

sec onal  one  that  has  been  conducted  in  2008  by  randomized  cluster 

sampling,  based  on  data  obtained  from  an  extensive  provincial  screening 

plan for adults aged over 30 years in rural areas of Fars province. Based on 

these data, the prevalence of diabetes, hypertension and their risk factors 

were  calculated  and  the  relationship  between  diabetes  and  hypertension 

was  determined  by  risk  factors  including  age,  sex,  family  history,  and  MI 

using  Chi  square  and  t-test  and  SPSS  so ware  version  17  and  Minitab 

version,  prevalences  in  15  is  rural  areas  were  compared  with  the  ones  in 

EMRO region countries.  



Results:   The prevalence  of  hypertension and  diabetes  rural areas  of  Fars 

province were calculated to be 21.8% and 11.14% respec vely as compared 

with rural areas of EMRO region countries.The prevalence of diabetes was 

also lower on the average and the prevalence of obesity (BMI>30), was less 

than other countries in the region and Iran. 

Conclusion: In general, although, the prevalence obtained in this study was 

lower than other regional countries, raising a wareness in high rish groups 

affected public commitment to basic  information transmitting to high  risk 

classes of the society should be taken into account and commitment by the 



692 

 

 



health system administration and the government to sustain monitoring of 

health,  to  ensure  curtailing  the  burden  of  diabetes  and  hypertension  and 

associated risk factors among countries of the region. 

 

Obes Rev. 2011 Jan;12(1):1-13. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-789X.2010.00750.x. 



The  Prevalence  and  Trends  of  Overweight,  Obesity  and 

Nutrition-Related  Non-Communicable  Diseases  in  the 

Arabian Gulf States. 

Ng SW, Zaghloul S, Ali HI, Harrison G, Popkin BM. 

Department  of  Nutrition,  University  of  North  Carolina,  Chapel  Hill,  USA. 

shuwen@unc.edu 



Abstract 

This  paper  reviews  studies  on  the  prevalence  of  overweight,  obesity  and 

related  nutrition-related  non-communicable  diseases  in  Bahrain,  Kuwait, 

Qatar, Oman, Saudi Arabia and the UAE. Obesity is common among women; 

while men have an equal or higher overweight prevalence. Among adults, 

overweight plus obesity rates are especially high in Kuwait, Qatar and Saudi 

Arabia, and especially among 30-60 year olds (70-85% among men; 75-88% 

among women), with lower levels among younger and elderly adults. The 

rate  of  increase  in  obesity  was  pronounced  in  Saudi  Arabia  and  Kuwait. 

Prevalence of obesity is high among Kuwaiti and Saudi pre-schoolers (8-9%), 

while  adolescent  overweight  and  obesity  are  among  the  highest  in  the 

world,  with  Kuwait  having  the  worst  es mates  (40-46%);  however, 

comparison of child data is difficult because of differing standards. Among 

nutrition-related  non-communicable  diseases,  hypertension  and  diabetes 

levels  are  very  high  and  increase  with  age,  with  the  UAE  performing  the 

worst  because  of  a  rapid  rate  of  increase  between  1995  and  2000. 

Additional  monitoring  of  the  prevalence  of  metabolic  syndrome  and 

cancers  is  necessary.  Nationally  representative  longitudinal  surveys  with 

individual,  household  and  community-level  information  are  needed  to 

determine  the  importance  of  various  factors  that  contribute  to  these 

troubling trends. 

 

 



693 

 

 



Springer Series on Epidemiology and Public Health, 2011, Volume 2, Part 1, 

127-152, DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4419-6039-9_8  



Prevalence  and  Etiology:  Middle  East  and  North  Africa 

(MENA) Countries  

Hafez Elzein and Sima Hamadeh 



Abstract  

The increasing prevalence of obesity at  an alarming rate in many parts  of 

the world probably has multiple underlying etiologies. Obesity is generally 

attributed  to  a  combination  of  genetic  and/or  environmental  factors.  In 

children,  genetic,  prenatal  and  perinatal  factors  have  a  great  effect  on 

individual  predisposition,  practices  and  behaviors,  contributing  to  a  long-

term positive energy balance.  

 

East Mediterr Health J. 2010 Sep;16(9):1009-17. 



Childhood Obesity in the Middle East: A Review. 

Mirmiran P, Sherafat-Kazemzadeh R, Jalali-Farahani S, Azizi F. 



Abstract 

Accurate  and  comprehensive  data  on  the  extent  of  the  problem  of 

childhood  obesity  is  lacking  in  countries  of  the  Middle  East.  This  review, 

based  on a Medline  search, summarizes the  prevalence of obesity  among 

children and adolescents in the region during 1990-2007. The highest rates 

of obesity and overweight were reported from Bahrain and the lowest from 

the Islamic Republic of Iran. Studies from Saudi Arabia, Islamic Republic of 

Iran and Kuwait showed an upwards trend in childhood obesity compared 

with a decade ago. Lack of uniformity in reference standards and reporting 

systems renders comparisons difficult. Nevertheless, the I high prevalence 

of  childhood  obesity in  the Middle  East should  stimulate policy-makers  in 

the region to set up effective national and regional surveillance systems. 

 

 

 



 

 


694 

 

 



Diabet Med. 2010 May;27(5):593-7. 

Gender  Differences  In  Prevalence  of  the  Metabolic 

Syndrome  in  Gulf  Cooperation  Council  Countries:  A 

Systematic Review. 

Mabry RM, Reeves MM, Eakin EG, Owen N. 



Abstract 

AIMS: To systematically review studies documenting the prevalence of the 

metabolic syndrome among men and women in Member States of the Gulf 

Cooperative Council (GCC; Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and 

the United Arab Emirates)-countries in which obesity, Type 2 diabetes and 

related metabolic and cardiovascular diseases are highly prevalent. 

METHODS:    A  search  was  conducted  on  PubMed  and  CINAHL  using  the 

term  'metabolic  syndrome'  and  the  country  name  of  each  GCC  Member 

State. The search was limited to studies published in the English language. 

The  metabolic  syndrome  was  defined  according  to  the  Third  Adult 

Treatment  Panel  (ATPIII)  of  the  National  Cholesterol  Education  Program 

(NCEP)  and/or  International  Diabetes  Federation  (IDF)  definitions.  The 

methodological quality of each study was evaluated based on four criteria: 

a  national-level  population  sample;  equal  gender  representation; 

robustness of the sample size; an explicit sampling methodology. 

RESULTS:    PubMed,  CINAHL  and  reference  list  searches  identified  nine 

relevant studies. Only four were considered high quality and found that, for 

men,  the  prevalence  of  the  metabolic  syndrome  ranged  from  20.7%  to 

37.2% (ATPIII defini on) and from 29.6% to 36.2% (IDF defini on); and, for 

women, from 32.1% to 42.7% (ATPIII defini on) and from 36.1% to 45.9% 

(IDF definition). 



CONCLUSIONS:  Overall,  the  prevalence  of  the  metabolic  syndrome  in  the 

GCC states is some 10-15% higher than in most developed countries, with 

generally  higher  prevalence  rates  for  women.  Preventive  strategies  will 

require  identifying  socio-demographic  and  environmental  correlates 

(particularly  those  influencing  women)  and  addressing  modifiable  risk 

behaviors,  including  lack  of  physical  activity,  prolonged  sitting  time  and 

dietary intake. 

 

 



695 

 

 



Ann Nutr Metab. 2010;57(3-4):193-203. Epub 2010 Nov 18. 

Nutrition  Transition  and  Cardiovascular  Disease  Risk 

Factors  in  Middle  East  and  North  Africa  Countries: 

Reviewing the Evidence. 

Mehio Sibai A, Nasreddine L, Mokdad AH, Adra N, Tabet M, Hwalla N. 

Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, American University of 

Beirut, Lebanon. 



Abstract 

AIM: To examine the burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in 

Middle East and North Africa countries and their associations with dietary 

behaviors as nutrition transition is unfolding in the region. 

DATA: Data on CVD risk factors were collected from scholarly papers and a 

systematic  review  of  published  articles  was  performed.  Dietary  patterns 

were derived from the WHO  Food and Agriculture Organization  Statistical 

Databases. 



RESULTS:  Wide variations exist across countries in the prevalence of CVD 

risk  factors,  namely  obesity,  diabetes,  hypertension,  hyperlipidemia, 

smoking and physical inactivity, with some countries showing high values of 

certain factors which approach those observed in the developed world. In 

particular,  obesity  prevalence  rates  have  reached  alarming  levels, 

particularly  among  women  in  the  oil-rich  countries  (over  40%),  making  it 

the  most  pressing  health  concern  in  the  region.  Trends  in  the  dietary 

pattern illustrated a consistent rise in total energy supply by approximately 

730  kcal  per  capita  per  day  between  1970  and  2005.  Dietary  pa erns 

showed  an  increased  consumption  of  fat  and  animal  protein  and  a 

decreased  intake  of  carbohydrates,  particularly  whole  grain  cereals,  and 

fresh fruits and vegetables. 



CONCLUSION:    Regional  differences  were  attributed  to  differences  in 

lifestyle,  occupation  and  a  shift  from  traditional  food  habits.  Our 

understanding  of  the  CVD  disparities  across  various  geographic  regions  is 

key to our effort in planning relevant intervention programs. Public health 

efforts  should  focus  on  obesity,  physical  inactivity  and  unhealthy  dietary 

practices.  The  success  of  these  interventions  depends  on  governmental 

commitment,  multisectoral  partnership  and  a  consideration  of  the 

sociocultural norms of the target population. 



 

696 

 

 



J Am Coll Nutr. 2010 Jun;29(3 Suppl):289S-301S. 

Obesity, the Metabolic Syndrome, and Type 2 Diabetes in 

Developing Countries: Role of Dietary Fats and Oils. 

Misra A, Singhal N, Khurana L. 

Department  of  Diabetes  and  Metabolic  Diseases,  Fortis  Hospital,  Vasant 

Kunj, New Delhi, India.

 

anoopmisra@metabolicresearchindia.com 



Abstract 

Developing  countries  are  undergoing  rapid  nutrition  transition  concurrent 

with  increases  in  obesity,  the  metabolic  syndrome,  and  type  2  diabetes 

mellitus (T2DM). From a healthy tradi onal high-fiber, low-fat, low-calorie 

diet,  a  shift  is  occurring  toward  increasing  consumption  of  calorie-dense 

foods containing refined carbohydrates, fats, red meats, and low fiber. Data 

show  an  increase  in  the  supply  of  animal  fats  and  increased  intake  of 

saturated fatty acid  (SFAs) (obtained from  coconut oil, palm  oil, and  ghee 

[clarified butter])  in  many  developing  countries,  particularly  in  South  Asia 

and South-East Asia. In some  South Asian populations, particularly  among 

vegetarians,  intake  of  n-3  polyunsaturated  fa y  acids  (PUFAs)  (obtained 

from  flaxseed,  mustard,  and  canola  oils)  and  long-chain  (LC)  n-3  PUFAs 

(obtained  from  fish  and  fish  oils)  is  low.  Further,  the  effect  of 

supplementation  of  n-3  PUFAs  on  metabolic  risk  factors  and  insulin 

resistance,  except  for  demonstrated  benefit  in  terms  of  decreased 

triglycerides,  needs  further  investigation  among  South  Asians.  Data  also 

show  that  intake  of  monounsaturated  fatty  acids  (MUFAs)  ranged  from 

4.7% to 16.4%en in developing countries, and supplementing it from olive, 

canola, mustard, groundnut, and rice bran oils may reduce metabolic  risk. 

In  addition,  in  some  developing  countries,  intake  of  n-6  PUFAs  (obtained 

from sunflower, safflower, corn, soybean, and sesame oils) and trans-fatty 

acids (TFAs) is increasing. These data show imbalanced consumption of fats 

and  oils  in  developing  countries,  which  may  have  potentially  deleterious 

metabolic and glycemic consequences, although more research is needed. 

In view of the rapid rise of T2DM in developing countries, more aggressive 

public  health  awareness  programs  coupled  with  governmental  action  and 

clear country-specific guidelines are required, so as to promote widespread 

use  of  healthy  oils,  thus  curbing  intake  of  SFAs  and  TFAs,  and  increasing 

intake  of  n-3  PUFAs  and  MUFAs.  Such  ac ons  would  contribute  to 

decelerating  further  escalation  of  "epidemics"  of  obesity,  the  metabolic 

syndrome, and T2DM in developing countries. 

 


697 

 

 



Am J Clin Nutr November 2010 vol. 92 no. 5 1257-1264  

Global  Prevalence  and  Trends  of  Overweight  and  Obesity 

among Preschool Children

1

,

2

,

3

,

4

 

Mercedes de Onis, Monika Blössner, Elaine Borghi 

+ Author Affiliations 

1

From  the  Growth  Assessment  and  Surveillance  Unit,  Department  of 



Nutrition for Health and Development, World Health Organization, Geneva, 

Switzerland.  

+ Author Notes 

↵2 The  authors  are  staff  members of  the  World  Health  Organization.  The 

authors  alone  are  responsible  for  the  views  expressed  in  this  publication 

and they do not necessarily represent the decisions, policy or views of the 

World Health Organization.  

↵3 The project had no specific funding.  

↵4 Address reprint requests and correspondence to M de Onis, Department 

of Nutri on, World Health Organiza on, 20 Avenue Appia, 1211 Geneva 27, 

Switzerland. E-mail: deonism@who.int.  

Abstract 

BACKGROUND:  Childhood  obesity  is  associated  with  serious  health 

problems  and  the  risk  of  premature  illness  and  death  later  in  life. 

Monitoring related trends is important.  

OBJECTIVE:  The  objective  was  to  quantify  the  worldwide  prevalence  and 

trends of overweight and obesity among preschool children on the basis of 

the new World Health Organization standards.  

DESIGN:  A  total  of  450  na onally  representa ve  cross-sectional  surveys 

from 144 countries were analyzed. Overweight and obesity were defined as 

the  propor on  of  preschool  children  with  values  >2  SDs  and  >3  SDs, 

respectively, from the World Health Organization growth standard median. 

Being “at risk of overweight” was defined as the propor on with values >1 

SD  and  ≤2  SDs,  respec vely.  Linear  mixed-effects  modeling  was  used  to 

estimate the rates and numbers of affected children.  

RESULTS:  In  2010, 43  million children  (35 million  in developing  countries) 

were  es mated  to  be  overweight  and  obese;  92  million  were  at  risk  of 

overweight. The worldwide prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity 

increased from  4.2%  (95%  CI: 3.2%,  5.2%)  in  1990 to  6.7%  (95%  CI:  5.6%, 



698 

 

 



7.7%) in 2010. This trend is expected to reach 9.1% (95% CI: 7.3%, 10.9%), 

or ≈60 million, in 2020. The es mated prevalence of childhood overweight 

and obesity in Africa in 2010 was 8.5% (95% CI: 7.4%, 9.5%) and is expected 

to reach 12.7% (95% CI: 10.6%, 14.8%) in 2020. The prevalence is lower in 

Asia than in Africa (4.9% in 2010), but the number of affected children (18 

million) is higher in Asia.  



CONCLUSIONS:  Childhood  overweight  and  obesity  have  increased 

drama cally  since  1990.  These  findings  confirm  the  need  for  effec ve 

interventions starting as early as infancy to reverse anticipated trends.  

 

EMHJ (Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal), 2010;16(2). 



Practices  in  Child  Growth  Monitoring  in  the  Countries  of 

the Eastern Mediterranean Region 

Abul-Fadl,1 K. Bagchi 2 and L. Cheikh Ismail  



Abstract 

Growth reference charts are among the most sensitive and valuable  tools 

for assessing the health 

and development of children. A ques onnaire survey was answered by 16 

of  the  21  ministries  of  health  in  the  Eastern  Mediterranean  Region 

countries (EMR) about their use of growth charts for children under 5 years. 

Most of the countries (13/16) used the NCHS/WHO charts and weight-for-

age  was  the  most  commonly  used.  Charts  for  height-for-age  and  head 

circumference-for-age  were  less  commonly  used.  Problems  in  the  use  of 

charts  were  identified.  The  introduction  of  the  new  WHO  Child  Growth 

Standards, based on exclusively breastfed babies, is a unique opportunity to 

support growth monitoring and optimal feeding practices in EMR. 

 

East Mediterr Health J. 2009 May-Jun; 15(3):549-62. 



Stunting  is  a  Major  Risk  Factor  for  Overweight:  Results 

from Na onal Surveys in 5 Arab Countries.  

El Taguri A, Besmar F, Abdel Monem A, Betilmal I, Ricour C, Rolland-Cachera 

MF. 

Hôpital Necker Enfants Malades, Paris, France. tajoury@pediatrician.com 



Abstract 

699 

 

 



We analysed data on overweight and stunting  from large national surveys 

performed  between  2001  and  2004  in  5  Arab  countries  (Djibouti,  Libyan 

Arab  Jamahiriya,  Morocco,  Syrian  Arab  Republic  and  Yemen).  Overweight 

and  stunting  were  defined  according  to  new  WHO  growth  standards. 

Overweight ranged from 8.9% in Yemen to 20.2% in Syrian Arab  Republic. 

The risk  ratio (RR) for overweight  in stunted children ranged from 2.14  in 

Djibou  to  3.85  in Libyan  Arab  Jamahiriya. RR  ranged  from 0.76  in  mildly 

stunted  children  of  Yemen  to  7.15  in  severely  stunted  children  in  Libyan 

Arab Jamahiriya. E ological frac on in the popula on ranged from 7.49% to 

69.76%. 


 

Diab Vasc Dis Res. 2008 Nov;5(4):304-9. 




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling