Public Release Unclassified


Download 4.57 Mb.

bet1/42
Sana10.01.2019
Hajmi4.57 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   42

 

 
 
 
 
 
Public Release – Unclassified 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Disclaimer 
The findings in this report are not to be construed as an official Department of 
Defense position unless so designated by other authorizing documents. 

 

    
 
 
 
 
Dear Reader: 
 
This Chemical, Biological, Radiological Technology Survey was funded by The Joint 
Program Executive Office for Chemical & Biological Defense and the Defense Threat Reduction 
Agency/Joint Science and Technology Office to compile a technology survey on biosurveillance 
hardware systems which have applicability in detecting and/or assessing human exposure to 
chemical, biological, and radiological agents. This survey encompasses a variety of systems from 
manual systems to fully automated technologies. Unlike previous market surveys this effort 
includes all forms of CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL and RADIOLOGICAL analysis platforms. 
The focus of this technology horizon scan is on the hardware systems that support 
biosurveillance; software biosurveillance efforts will be collected under a separate effort.  
The information in this book was gathered using a detailed online survey that was 
completed by the vendor.  The intent was to ensure that the information was accurate and was 
not derived from a 3
rd
 party source or internet search that could result in incorrect or outdated 
information.  The information was analyzed using a weighted system designed to determine the 
device’s usefulness in four different scenarios: Field use, Transportable Laboratory use, 
Diagnostic Laboratory use, Analytical Laboratory use.  
We would like to suggest the following methodology for using this guide.  
 
1.
 
Review the four different scenarios and note how the devices or systems ranked for a scenario of 
interest.  
2.
 
Remember that scores have a subjective component and that all the technologies are included in 
the ranking so don’t go by the raw score only.  
3.
 
Go to Detailed Product Sheets Section and look up the product name for detailed information on 
the product. 
4.
 
Finally, contact the manufacturer for more information or visit their website. 
The “Summary Section” is a quick reference guide to identify if a device detects 
chemical, biological, or radiologicals. The Summary Section includes a maturity gauge to 
quickly tell if the product is commercially available. The bulk of the survey is contained in the 
Detailed Product Sheets Section which includes product specifications in a standardized format 
for easy comparison.  The devices are alphabetized to make it easier to find a product of interest. 
We hope that you find this survey both helpful and interesting.  
 
Sincerely, 
 
 
 
      
 
Peter Emanuel Ph.D. 
 
 
 
 
 
Matthew Caples Ph.D. 
U.S. Army ECBC 
 
 
 
 
 
Booz Allen Hamilton 
BioScience Division Chief 
 
 
 
 
Lead Associate 
Peter.emanuel@us.army.mil  
 
 
 
 
caples_matthew@bah.com 

Lists of Symbols for Product Sheets 
 
 
Symbol 
Definition 
 
Commercially Available and Meets Military Specifications 
 
Commercially Available 
 
Brass Board 
 
Bread Board 
 
White Board 
 
 
 
Symbols 
Definition 
 
Biological Agent Idenfitication 
 
Chemical Agent Identification 
 
Radiological Identification 

Public Release – Unclassified 
Contents
 
Contents ........................................................................................................................................................ 1 
Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 3 
Four Scenarios of Use ................................................................................................................................... 3 
Man portable and field use ....................................................................................................................... 3 
Mobile laboratory/ field laboratory .......................................................................................................... 3 
Diagnostic laboratory or point of care use ............................................................................................... 3 
High sensitivity, high throughput analytical laboratory............................................................................ 4 
Evaluation Process ........................................................................................................................................ 4 
Evaluation of Detection Devices or Systems ................................................................................................. 5 
Field use .................................................................................................................................................... 6 
Results ................................................................................................................................................... 6 
Mobile laboratory/ field laboratory ........................................................................................................ 10 
Results ................................................................................................................................................. 10 
Diagnostic laboratory or point of care use ............................................................................................. 14 
Results ................................................................................................................................................. 14 
High sensitivity, high throughput analytical laboratory.......................................................................... 18 
Results ................................................................................................................................................. 18 
Summary ..................................................................................................................................................... 22 
Summary Section ........................................................................................................................................ 23 
Detailed Product Sheets.............................................................................................................................. 41 
Appendix I ................................................................................................................................................... I-1 
Appendix II ................................................................................................................................................. II-1 
 
Figure 1: Hierarchy of Criteria ....................................................................................................................... 4 
Figure 2: Description of Scoring Bar.............................................................................................................. 5 
Figure 3: Field Use Weights........................................................................................................................... 6 
Figure 4: NIDS Medical Reader System ......................................................................................................... 6 
Figure 5: ChemPro PD ................................................................................................................................... 6 
Figure 6: RADIR ............................................................................................................................................. 7 
Figure 7: T2Dx ............................................................................................................................................... 7 
APPROVED FOR UNLIMITED DISTRIBUTION 
UNCLASSIFIED
1

Figure 8: Biological Specific Systems – Field Use .......................................................................................... 8 
Figure 9: Chemical Specific Systems – Field Use ........................................................................................... 8 
Figure 10: Radiological Specific Systems – Field Use .................................................................................... 9 
Figure 11: Biological/Chemical Systems – Field Use ..................................................................................... 9 
Figure 12: Chemical/Radiological Systems – Field Use ................................................................................. 9 
Figure 13: Biological/Chemical/Radiological – Field Use .............................................................................. 9 
Figure 14: Mobile Laboratory/ Field Laboratory Weights .......................................................................... 10 
Figure 15: uScope ........................................................................................................................................ 10 
Figure 16: CDS-100 (Compact Diagnostic System) ...................................................................................... 10 
Figure 17: Radiation Pager .......................................................................................................................... 11 
Figure 18: MICT ........................................................................................................................................... 11 
Figure 19: Biological Specific Systems – Mobile Laboratory ....................................................................... 12 
Figure 20: Chemical Specific Systems – Mobile Laboratory ....................................................................... 12 
Figure 21: Radiological Specific Systems – Mobile Laboratory ................................................................... 13 
Figure 22: Biological/Chemical Systems – Mobile Laboratory .................................................................... 13 
Figure 23: Chemical/Radiological Systems – Mobile Laboratory ................................................................ 13 
Figure 24: Biological/Chemical/Radiological Systems – Mobile Laboratory ............................................... 13 
Figure 25: Diagnostic Laboratory or Point of Care Use Weights ................................................................ 14 
Figure 26: Luminex 100/200 ....................................................................................................................... 14 
Figure 27: TIRF Sense Portable Sensor TIFR-EC .......................................................................................... 14 
Figure 28: Radiation Control Monitor ......................................................................................................... 15 
Figure 29: REBS - Laboratory Variant .......................................................................................................... 15 
Figure 30: Biological Specific Systems – Diagnostic Laboratory ................................................................. 16 
Figure 31: Chemical Specific Systems – Diagnostic Laboratory .................................................................. 16 
Figure 32: Radiological Specific Systems – Diagnostic Laboratory ............................................................. 17 
Figure 33: Biological/Chemical Systems – Diagnostic Laboratory .............................................................. 17 
Figure 34: Chemical/Radiological Systems – Diagnostic Laboratory .......................................................... 17 
Figure 35: Biological/Chemical/Radiological Systems – Diagnostic Laboratory ......................................... 17 
Figure 36: High Sensitivity, High Throughput Analytical Laboratory Weights ............................................ 18 
Figure 37: LightCycler 480 ........................................................................................................................... 18 
Figure 38: Chemical Biological Detection System ....................................................................................... 18 
Figure 39: DCI-I ............................................................................................................................................ 19 
Figure 40: SAFESITE MTX ............................................................................................................................ 19 
Figure 41: Biological Specific Systems – Analytical Laboratory .................................................................. 20 
Figure 42: Chemical Specific Systems – Analytical Laboratory ................................................................... 20 
Figure 43: Radiological Specific Systems – Analytical Laboratory .............................................................. 21 
Figure 44: Biological/Chemical Systems – Analytical Laboratory ............................................................... 21 
Figure 45: Chemical/Radiological Systems – Analytical Laboratory ........................................................... 21 
Figure 46: Biological/Chemical/Radiological Systems – Analytical Laboratory .......................................... 21 
 
Table 1: Distribution of Scenario Weights .................................................................................................... 4 
 
 
APPROVED FOR UNLIMITED DISTRIBUTION 
                                              UNCLASSIFIED
2

2011 Chemical, Biological, Radiological Technology Survey 
Emanuel and Caples 
Introduction 
This Chemical, Biological, Radiological Technology Survey 
was  sponsored  by  Dr.  Jason  Roos  of  the  Joint  Program 
Executive  Office,  Chemical  Biological  Medical  Systems, 
Biosurveillance (provisional) (JPM-BSV [provisional]) and 
Dr. William Huff of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency 
(DTRA).  It  provides  a  snapshot  of  available  detection  and 
diagnostic  systems  and  devices  that  can  detect  and/or 
identify  the  presence  of  biological,  chemical,  and 
radiological agents. This report reviews and scores vendor-
supplied  information  about  detection  devices  or  systems. 
The  survey  was  publically  available  to  all  companies  and 
widely  publicized  by  Edgewood  Chemical  Biological 
Center  (ECBC)  and  the  Johns  Hopkins  University  – 
Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU-APL) to promote a wide 
range  of  submissions.  The  devices  or  systems  were  scored 
using  74  specific  questions  that  were  weighted,  based  on 
four  scenarios of use: field use;  mobile or  field  laboratory; 
diagnostic  laboratory  or  point  of  care  use;  and  high 
sensitivity,  high  throughput  analytical  laboratory.  The 
unique  features  of  each  scenario  are  detailed  in  the 
following  section;  each  unique  feature  was  considered  in 
determining the weights of the survey evaluation criteria.  
Four Scenarios of Use 
The  range  of  detection  devices  and  systems  is  continually 
evolving  and  includes  improvement  on  gold  standard 
detection  systems  as  well  as  development  of  new 
technologies. 
However, 
in 
different 
operational 
environments, one device or system  may be preferred  over 
others based on situational  circumstances.  In  the following 
scenarios,  four  distinct  environments  demonstrate  how 
different situations can require different devices or systems 
for biological agent detection. 
Man portable and field use 
Field use detection devices or systems are typically used by 
CBRN  defense  and  force  health  protection  Warfighters  or 
scientists  conducting  analyses.  These  devices  or  systems 
would  be used  outdoors in a variety  of  environments (e.g., 
desert,  forest,  plains,  urban)  and  be  subjected  to  various 
environmental conditions (e.g., heat,  cold,  humidity). They 
need  to  be  small,  lightweight,  and  easy  to  carry.  They 
should  be  simple  to  operate  and  should  not  require  other 
machinery  such  as  centrifuges  or  heat  blocks.  Kits  or 
devices  with  limited  electrical  requirements  are  preferred. 
These  devices  can  be  disposable  with  a  single  use  only  or 
they  can  be  reusable  with  minimal  cleaning  required  for 
reuse.  Signature  is  important  in  the  operation  of  these 
devices  or  systems,  as  large  ventilation  systems  or 
protective gear could jeopardize covert operations. Field use 
devices can have a narrow range of detectable agents, (e.g., 
can  be  specific  for  one  particular  target)  because  several 
different devices may be deployed on a mission. 
Mobile laboratory/ field 
laboratory 
Mobile and field laboratory detection devices or systems are 
located in mobile  laboratories.  They  would  likely be semi-
automated  or  integrated  into  a  system  that  is  capable  of  a 
higher throughput of samples (i.e., 20-30 samples at a time). 
Some  additional  equipment  such  as  centrifuges  and 
vortexes  can  be  used  during  operation,  although  smaller 
systems  are  preferred.  Size  is  a  concern  with  mobile 
laboratory  components  because  space  is  limited  and  the 
detection device or system is likely only one component of 
the laboratory. A mobile laboratory would ideally be able to 
operate  for  a  longer  period  of  time  than  a  field  use  item, 
therefore  consumables  and  manpower  are  a  concern. 
Signature is somewhat important for the mobile laboratory, 
as  extensive  safety  precautions  could  hinder  the  mobility 
and  camouflage  of  the  mobile  laboratory.  The  mobile 
laboratory detection device or system should ideally be able 
to detect a wide range of agents. 
Diagnostic laboratory or point of 
care use 
The  diagnostic  laboratory  or  point  of  care  use  scenario 
includes both brick and mortar laboratories, as well as non 
laboratory  spaces  such  as  a  physician  office  or  clinic.  The 
ability  to  obtain  FDA  approval  and  510k  clearance  were 
weighted  heavily  to  emphasize  diagnostic  capability.  The 
device or system must be able to detect agents from blood, 
tissue,  cultured  cells,  and  other  typical  samples.  Logistical 
or  operational  concerns,  such  as  size,  weight,  signature, 
transportation, additional equipment, and consumables were 
not considered essential for this scenario; however, logistics 
would be important in moving point of care use forward in 
the  Combat  Health  Support  system.  Ideally,  the  diagnostic 
laboratory or point of care detection device or system must 
be  able  to  detect  biological  agents  from  all  encountered 
samples  with  a  consistently  high  level  of  specificity  and 
sensitivity.  
APPROVED FOR UNLIMITED DISTRIBUTION 
UNCLASSIFIED
3

High sensitivity, high throughput 
analytical laboratory 
Analytical  laboratory  detection  devices  or  systems  are 
typically  located  in  a  brick  and  mortar  building,  such  as  a 
hospital  or  laboratory.  They  would  be  fully  automated 
devices  capable  of  high  throughput  of  samples.  An  ideal 
detection  device  would  detect  a  variety  of  agents  quickly, 
have  a  high  level  of  sensitivity,  and  be  easy  to  operate. 
Because of the location of the system, device characteristics 
such  as  signature,  additional  equipment,  and  electrical 
requirements  are  of  less  concern.  The  device  should  be 
easily maintained with regularly scheduled maintenance and 
be relatively easy for a medical staff to operate. 
Evaluation Process 
The  four  scenarios  detailed  above  represent  distinctly 
different  uses  of  detection  technologies;  in  essence,  each 
scenario  involves  different  objectives  and  requirements  for 
the  devices  or  systems.  Once  the  objectives  and 
requirements for the four scenarios were clearly defined, the 
authors  generated  an  evaluation  model.  The  foundation  of 
the  model  is  the  evaluation  criteria,  which  represent  the 
important  attributes  for  detection  and  are  intended  to 
differentiate the various types of products. The criteria were 
structured in the form of a hierarchy, as shown in Figure 1. 
 
Figure 1: Hierarchy of Criteria 
Each  evaluation  criterion  was  defined  and  then  further 
described  with  a  performance  scale.  The  scales  provide  a 
means  of  measuring  how  well  each  product  “performs” 
relative  to  each  criterion.  The  performance  scales  can  be 
quantitative  (e.g.,  speed,  measured  in  minutes)  or 
qualitative (e.g., utility, measured by assessing the best fit). 
Each level on the scale was assigned a utility value, ranging 
from  zero  for  the  lowest  expected  performance  to  100  for 
the  highest  level  of  expected  performance.  Intermediate 
levels  of  performance  were  assigned  values  between  zero 
and 100. The final step in developing the evaluation model 
was to weight the criteria. The weights indicate the relative 
value  of  a  criterion,  as  defined  by  its  performance  scale, 
compared  to  the  other  criteria.  The  criteria  were  weighted 
by  distributing  100  points  amongst  the  individual  criteria 
under  the  four  headings  of  effectiveness,  logistics, 
operations,  and  agents  detected..  Because  each  scenario  is 
concerned  with  different  objectives  and  requirements,  the 
criteria  weights  varied  depending  on  the  scenario.  Table  1 
shows  how  the  weights  were  distributed  relative  to  the 
different scenarios. 
 
 


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   42


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling