Researched by: Sarah LeVario


Download 81.12 Kb.
Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi81.12 Kb.

 

 

 



 

Crime in Pomona’s 

Parks 

Researched by: Sarah LeVario 



 

 

Geo 435 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 


Abstract 

 

The idea of going to one of Pomona’s parks often strikes fear and worry into the 



visitor’s initial reaction about visiting one of the parks. I must admit that I too felt this 

way when presented with this project on Pomona’s parks. Many people have this 

perception deeply embedded in their minds that Pomona’s parks are dangerous, gang 

infested, dirty with graffiti, and unsafe to visit all around. This perception is what 

inspired the thesis for this project; are Pomona’s parks dangerous or are they really safe? 

In order to uncover if this perception is true or not I first had to look at what qualities a 

park must have in order for it to be considered safe by its users. Then I had to look at 

what created this perception in the first place. I then looked at what types of crimes were 

being committed around the areas of six randomly chosen parks, one from each district in 

Pomona. The six parks chosen were Hamilton Park from District One, Ralph Welch Park 

from District Two, Renacimiento Community Center from District Three, Garfield Park 

from District Four, Phillips Ranch Park from District Five, and Ganesha Park from 

District Six. I then took the standards and applied them to the six randomly chosen parks 

to see if they passed these standards. Finally I concluded my research looking at what 

types of preventive measures the city is implementing in order too make the parks a safe 

place. At the end of my research I proved whether the perception about Pomona’s parks 

was valid or invalid. 

 

 



 

 


What makes a Park safe? 

 

 



The book, The Excellent Park System: What Makes it Great and How to 

Get there, written by author Peter Harnik addresses what makes a park safe from crime 

for its users. Harnik says, “Crime, of course, is dependent on a large number of factors 

that are beyond the reach of the park and recreation department—poverty, drug and 

alcohol use, population demographics, lack of stabilizing neighborhood institutions. But 

there are other factors—park location, park design, presence of uniformed personnel, 

presence of park amenities, availability of youth programming— over which the 

department has some control. Ultimately the greatest deterrent is the presence of large 

numbers of users.” For my research in addressing the question whether or not Pomona’s 

parks are safe I looked at Harnik’s criteria of poverty, neighborhood institutions, park 

location, presence of uniformed personnel, presence of park amenities, and availability of 

youth programs, and the number of park users. I also looked at crimes happening around 

the areas of the park compared to the amount of crime happening in the rest of the city. 

However, to fully understand Pomona’s parks dangerous perception I had to look at what 

created this perception in the first place.   

 

 


The History and Creation of Perception 

 

The city of Pomona was incorporated in 1888 and was known throughout 



California as being a prosperous agriculture center. However, with the city’s prosperity 

and growth came crime. In 1940 Pomona’s first gang called “The Sharkies”, a Latino 

gang, began to emerge and claimed 12

th

 Street as their territory. In 1954 the short film, 



“Gang Boy” starred Pomona gang members and was based off the true story of a truce 

between Latino gangs and white gangs in Pomona. Then in the late 1950s a rift between 

members of “The Sharkies” resulted in the formation of a new Pomona gang called 

“Cherrieville”.  

The 1965 Watts riots caused many African American families to move away from 

the violence in Los Angeles to the affordable housing in Pomona for a new start. 

However, with these families also came young gang members. In the 1970s the Crips and 

Bloods gangs from Los Angeles spread to the African American population in Pomona. 

As a result new Latino gangs began to form in order to protect themselves from the 

growing black gangs. 

In an attempt to give Pomona’s youth something constructive to do instead of  

participating in gang related activities; the city developed Cherrieville Park and Madison 

Park; also known as Sharkie Park, in 1973. However, these parks became hotspots for 

gangs to congregate and participate in activities such as drugs and alcohol use. The city 

installed signs at the parks with the names “Sharkie” and “Cherrieville” which created 

gang retaliations against each other’s parks. Rival gang members often ran over the signs 

with their cars.  


In the late 1970s Pomona’s Police Department formed an organized gang unit to 

deal with the city’s escalating gang problems. However due to the lack of funding the 

unit was forced to downsize from two officers to just one. In 1984 Pomona became the 

first city in the nation to have a computerized gang tracking system. However, in the late 

1980s to the mid 1990s, Pomona’s gang activity reached its climax with cocaine and 

violence from gangs battling over territory. Religious leaders and community activists 

were able to achieve a truce between the gangs that lasted for two years. Then on May 11, 

1996, gang member Ronald Mendoza shot and killed Officer Daniel Fraembs. Officer 

Fraembs was the first on-duty city police officer to be killed in the city’s 116 year history.  

 

 



 

In 2002 Cal Poly Pomona joined the city and school district’s clean up efforts in 

some of the crime infested neighborhoods. Then in 2004 CHP Officer Thomas Steiner 

was gunned down outside of Pomona’s Superior Court by a “Sharkie” gang member as 

part of his initiation for the gang. Lastly, in 2010 two gang members were shot and killed 

at Ted Greene Park by rival gang members.  



These are but some of the crimes that have been committed in Pomona due to 

gang attacks. However, these were some of the most publicized crime incidents that drew 

negative attention to the city of Pomona and thus further developed the perception of 

Pomona as being a gang infested and dangerous city.  

The gang’s history with the parks only further embeds the perception of the parks 

being dangerous places. I asked, Andrea Rico, who is the youth and family services 

manager for the City of Pomona, for her perception of a bad park in the city; she named  

Hamilton Park. She identified it as such because of its gang related history, the poorer 

neighborhood it is located in, and the large amounts of homeless people who stay at the 

park. Her perception of a good park is Ganesha Park because its amenities are well kept, 

it is in a good location, and because many people use the park. However, ironically she 

pointed out that Hamilton Park and Ganesha Park have the same amount of homeless 

people who stay in each park. But she added that at Ganesha Park the homeless people 

are able to hide in the hills surrounding the park. This proves that perception may be  

based on history and truth but sometimes places are not always what they appear to be. 

 

 



The Dark Reality 

 

Today, Pomona is the fifth largest city in Los Angeles County with a 



population over 150,000. Based on information obtained from the 2006 Bureau of Justice 

Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) rates, “Pomona is ranked 4

th

 in violent crimes per 



capita in Los Angeles County, 2

nd

 in property crimes per capita in Los Angeles County, 



18

th

 in violent crimes in California and 22



nd

 nationally in violent crimes for cities of 

similar population size (150,000 to 200,000 population)”. 

According to the 2006 Uniform Crime Report statistics, Pomona exceeds the per 

capita  averages  for  criminal  activity  over  other  cities  in  the  Los  Angeles  County.  

Pomona  has  the  highest  crime  rate  in  Los  Angeles  County  with  4,181  per  100,000 

population.  Pomona  exceeds  even  the  City  of  Los  Angeles  which  has  a  crime  rate  of 

3,850  per  100,000  population.  Pomona  is  ranked  second  in  violent  crimes  with  789  per 

100,000  population;  this  is  compared  to the  City  of  Los  Angeles  with  820  per  100,000 

population.  

Pomona’s crime concerns are connected to the demographics of Pomona, Pomona 

has  over  40,000  households  with  a  16.2%  poverty  rate.  According  to  the  Community 

Disadvantage Index, Pomona rates between a 9 and 10 consistently.  

  

 



 

 

 



 

 

CDI Index GIS Map for Pomona 2000 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 


 

Is Crime Happening in the Park? 

 

City officials are the first to admit that the City of Pomona has significant crime 



issues which they relate to high poverty rates and gang activity. However, just because 

the perception of the city as a whole is bad does not mean that the parks themselves have 

crime issues. Looking at the Crime Watch Maps provided by the City allows people to 

see the types of crimes being committed in each area over a thirty day period.  



 

Pomona Crime Watch Map for May 2011 

 

 



 

  

 



 

This chart shows the crimes committed in the area around the parks over a thirty day time 

period in May 2011. 

 

 

  



 

Looking at these six different parks and the types of crimes being committed in 

the area around the park, then making a comparison to the crime happening in the rest of 

the city proves that little to no crime is happening in Pomona’s Parks. The parks with the 

higher crime rates for the surrounding areas are located in the poorer areas of Pomona 

following Harnik’s criteria that safer parks are in good locations and away from poverty.  

 

  

  



Park 

Murder 


Arson 

Rape 


Theft 

Assault 


Robbery 

Vehicle 


Theft 

Burglary 

Hamilton Park 

District 1 

 

 

 



 





 

Ralph Welch Park 



District 2 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Renacimiento 



Community  

Center 


District 3 

 

 





 



Garfield Park 

District 4 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Phillips Ranch Park 



District 5 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Ganeha Park 

District 6 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Breaking Perception 

 

The City of Pomona is working hard to break the perception that its city and its 



parks are dangerous places. The city has renamed “Cherrieville” and “Sharkie” Park. 

“Cherrieville” is now Hamilton Park and “Sharkie” Park had been renamed Madison Park 

and is now named Ted Greene Park. 

The city has implemented new actions intended to prevent crimes in the parks. An 

example of these prevention efforts are purposed plans to remove doors from stalls in the 

park bathrooms. The idea behind removing the doors is that without the availability to 

hide behind a closed door less people will be brave enough to commit crimes that could 

easily be seen and therefore exposed.  

 

In order to keep the park amenities looking nice and to prevent future vandalizing 



of park property, the city has implemented a Graffiti removal team that removes all 

graffiti within 48 hours. When the graffiti is removed quickly it keeps the park looking 

nice and lowers the chances of future graffiti occurring. Keeping up such amenities meets 

Harnik’s standard regarding the presence of park amenities. 

 

The city also offers youth and senior citizen programs at some of the parks. An 



example of a positive city program is one which serves senior citizens lunch at Palomares 

Park. The city has also developed a Youth and Family Master Plan which encourages 

residents to become involved in their community through participation in events held at 

the parks and in other community events all of which are intended to make the city of 

Pomona a safer place to live. These youth and senior citizen programs also pass Harnik’s 

standard for park’s providing positive programs.  



The city has also encouraged Neighborhood Watch Programs and has set up a 

telephone line dedicated to a We Tip program whereby anonymous callers can report 

crimes. Encouraging the people of Pomona to take control of their neighborhoods and 

parks is intended to make them feel safer and to provide them an opportunity to report 

criminal activity to the police without fear of gang retaliation. 

 

The city encourages large amount of users by allowing the parks to be rented out 



for parties and other celebrations. Many of the park’s also host little league teams and 

other sport activities which bring in large numbers of park users. This large amount of 

users also passed Harnik’s criteria for a safe park.  

 

However, due to budget cuts the city park system cannot afford to pay for park 



security personnel. In this aspect the city of Pomona parks fail Harnik’s criteria for 

having uniformed personnel at the parks in order to make the parks safe. The parks do 

however require that large parties renting park space hire their own security guards to 

maintain control and to prevent unwanted party guests from causing problems.  

 

Overall, the parks of Pomona are heavily used  and the people who use the parks 



feel safe. There are exceptions to the rules of perception and even to Harnik’s criteria for 

what makes a park safe. An exception can be seen with Cesar Chavez Park. Cesar Chavez 

Park was built in a poor neighborhood and most people who work with the parks figured 

it would be vandalized and trashed. The reality of the park is that is has been kept clean 

and  is  one  of  the  nicer  parks  in  Pomona.  The  experience  of  this  park  exemplifies  the 

Broken  Windows  Theory,  which  theorizes  that  “monitoring  and  maintaining  urban 

environments in a well ordered condition may prevent vandalism as well as an escalation 

into more serious crime.” This theory supports the idea that when an area looks nice the 



public  is prone to  want to  keep the area looking  nice  and  is  more  likely to help prevent 

future  crimes  from  occurring.  In  this  manner  Caser  Chavez  Park  has  brought  its 

neighborhood a sense of pride and community.  

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

Making a Better Pomona 

 

 

Throughout my research for this project I found it very difficult to find 



information on the crimes occurring in Pomona’s Parks. Pomona Police only keep 

records of crimes which occur in a larger general area and which do not specify where the 

crimes actually occur. Cheryl Huber’s book Tracking Crime in New York City Parks 

address the very issue of how Police Departments do not keep accurate records of crimes 

happening in New York City Parks. New York City has a similar history to Pomona. 

Both cities were perceived as being one of the most dangerous United States cities to live 

in.  However, different from Pomona, New York has recently been able to turn its image 

around. Huber applauds New York’s efforts to turn around the city’s safety concerns but 

criticizes the city’s poor record keeping for crimes happening in the city’s parks. Huber 

argues, “

Data collection is a vital step toward crime prevention, helping to ensure the efficient 

deployment of resources to improve safety. Without this crucial information, the public is uninformed 

and the NYPD and the Parks Department are less able to efficiently and effectively 

address safety issues”.  This is true for the city of Pomona as well. If the Police 

Department kept accurate records of what crimes were being committed specifically in 

the parks they would be able to prevent and respond to those crimes more efficiently. 

Allowing those records to be accessed by the public allows the public to determine 

whether or not a park is safe; it allows the pubic to be more aware of the kinds of crimes 

occurring in the parks and would allow them to prepare for such crimes. For e

xample, if 

most crimes happen after five o’clock pm users of the park will know not to stay in the 

park past five o’clock. Huber states that “

Global Positioning Systems (GPS) devices, which 


can pinpoint an exact location on a digital map, offer one simple way of locating crimes.” This type of 

system can be used to track crimes occurring in Pomona’s parks. According to Huber “One crucial 

objective of tracking crime in parks is that the data be made public, with the 

understanding that public awareness leads to increased safety and greater accountability. 

The Parks Department should ensure that park users are informed.” By making these 

records readily available we will be able to use resources more appropriately in order to 

create cleaner and safer parks for all to use. This is a huge improvement the City of 

Pomona can make in order to improve the park’s perception and safety.  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

       


Conclusion 

 

Pomona has a history filled with violent gangs, crime, and poverty. The city is 



still facing these serious issues today. However, the city and its residents are working 

hard to turn their city around. One perception that has been created through Pomona’s 

history is that its parks are unsafe for users because they are infested with gangs, drugs, 

graffiti, and violence. However, after researching the crime occurring in the area 

surrounding the six parks located in the Pomona city districts, I concluded that little to no 

crime actually occurs in the parks compared to the rest of the city.  

 

According to Harnik’s criteria of what makes a safe park, most of Pomona’s parks 



failed criteria regarding good location, a location free from poverty, and uniformed 

personnel criteria. However, the parks passed the rest of Harnik’s criteria regarding 

neighborhood institutions, presence of park amenities, youth programs, and large number 

of park users.  

 

Overall, despite Pomona’s poverty issues I feel that perceptions that Pomona’s 



parks are dangerous places is invalid as long as the parks are used properly and there is 

observance of park and city rules and laws. Caser Chavez Park proved that there are 

exceptions to Harnik’s criteria proving that a park located in a poor, poverty stricken 

location can still be a center of community pride and safe place to be enjoyed and used by 

its community.  

 

The city of Pomona still has a long way to go in order to turn around poor 



perceptions of the city. One way to continue such progress would be to keep more 

specific and accurate reports and provide more accessible public records that keep track 

of the crimes being committed in the parks. By allowing these records the public can see 


what crimes are being committed and whether or not crime is decreasing in the parks 

thereby better assuring the public that city parks are safer places to visit.  

 

The City of Pomona is no different than other cities in terms of crime. New York 



City had its share of crime problems especially in their parks. However, through 

implementing programs which provide more specific public information regarding crime 

records for park locations, perceptions regarding New York parks has turned around.  

 

Pomona has an opportunity to become a great city, full of pride and community 



awareness. There is no better place to bring a community together than at a city park. 

Positive park activities and experiences provide hope for a better future. Turning around 

negative perceptions concerning Pomona’s parks is the first step towards creating a 

sustainable, positive, hopeful community in the city of Pomona. 

 

 

 



 

 


Work Cited 

 

Andre Rico-Youth and Family Service Manager 



Google Images. Retrieved on June 1, 2011. 

 

Harnick,P. (2006). What Makes it Great and How to Get There: The Excellent  



City Park System. Trust for   Public Land. 

 

Huber, C. (2007). Tracking Crime in New York City Parks. New York: New 



 

Yorkers for Parks. 

 

Inland Valley Daily Bulletin. (2004). Gangland: A look at Gangs in Southern California.  



Retrieved on May, 20 2011 from 

http://lang.dailybulletin.com/socal/gangs/articles/ivdbp2_pomtime.asp  

 

McCormick, J (2007). Better Park Design can Prevent Crime. National  



Recreation and Park Association.  

 

Pomona Police Crime Watch. Retrieved on June 1, 2011 from  



 

http://gis.ci.pomona.ca.us/crimewatch/default.aspx

 

 

UCR report rates 



 

(2009). Pomona Profile. Retrieved on April 18, 2011, from 

http://www.idcide.com/citydata/ca/pomona/htm 

 

 




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling