Review of bbc’s participation in YouView


Download 129.92 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
Sana17.05.2017
Hajmi129.92 Kb.
TuriReview

 

 

 

Response of British Sky Broadcasting Limited (‘Sky’) to the BBC Trust 

review of BBC’s participation in YouView 



 

1.

 

Introduction 

1.1


 

Sky welcomes the opportunity to input into the BBC Trust (‘the Trust’) review of the BBC’s 

participation in YouView (formerly Project Canvas).  This review comes at a key time in the 

venture’s  existence:  three  years  after  the  Trust  approved  the  creation  of  YouView;  12 

months  after  launch;  and  shortly  before  re-negotiation  of  the  joint  venture  shareholder 

agreement (which we understand needs to be in place by March 2014).

1

   


1.2

 

In contrast to the position when the Trust approved Project Canvas, we now know what 



YouView is and what it does, and have a better, if not  complete view on how it interacts 

with those outside the venture, like Sky.  Furthermore, the Trust is in a privileged position 

vis-à-vis the joint venture as it will have access to all the necessary information to enable it 

to  scrutinise  YouView’s  compliance  with  the  various  conditions  imposed  by  the  Trust  as 

part  of  its  approval  process  in  a  rigorous  and  robust  manner.    Due  to  an  overall  lack  of 

transparency,  non-shareholders  are  unable  to  verify  compliance  with  the  Trust’s 

conditions effectively.  

1.3


 

Sky’s interest in YouView is twofold.  On the one hand, YouView competes with Sky’s own 

television platform and services.  Secondly, as a content provider, Sky wishes to make its 

channels and programmes widely available, and has engaged with YouView to launch Sky’s 

internet  TV  service,  NOW  TV,  on  the  platform,  in  addition  to  supplying  its  channels  to 

distributors on the platform using IP-delivery.  Sky Store will also launch on the platform 

shortly. 

1.4


 

Sky’s  interest  as  a  competing  platform  operator  is  focussed  on  ensuring  that  the  BBC’s 

creation of and participation in YouView does not distort competition between television 

platforms  and  services  any  further  than  is  necessary  to  deliver  the BBC’s  public  interest 

objectives.   

1.5


 

As  a  content  provider,  Sky  has  invested  significantly  in  adapting  its  internet  TV  service, 

NOW  TV,  for  the  YouView  platform  and  intends  expanding  its  offering  to  include  linear 

channels and additional content so that the service on YouView matches that available on 

other platforms and devices.  Sky has also entered into arrangements, or is in negotiations, 

for the distribution of its content by BT and TalkTalk as part of their television services on 

the platform.    

1.6


 

Both interests rely heavily on the conditions set out in the Trust’s “Final Conclusions” of 25 

June 2010 (‘the Trust Conditions’) intended to create “a standards based open environment 

for  internet  connected  television  platforms  in  the  UK”

2

  including  a  new  ‘open  platform’  for 



                                                           

1

  



YouView  partners  agree  on  expansion

”,  ft.com  dated  28  July  2013,  and  “

YouView  shareholders 

weigh cash injection

”, ft.com dated 10 October 2013. 

2

  

See the BBC’s 2008 non-service application titled “Canvas: Proposition and Public Value Case”.  



Confidential 

 



2906346_1 

 

content  providers,  to  ensure  that  Sky  is  not  unduly  prejudiced  by  this  unprecedented 



intervention in the sector.   

1.7


 

Sky’s comments to the Trust are framed by these two complementary interests.   

1.8

 

As this response contains details of commercially sensitive discussions between Sky and 



the  joint  venture  and  its  shareholders,  we  ask  that  the  Trust  treat  the  response  as 

confidential.    Should  the  Trust  need  to  disclose  specific  information  contained  in  this 

submission to those parties, we would be happy to consider such disclosure on a case by 

case basis. 



2.

 

The nature and scope of the Trust’s review 

The Trust’s review should be comprehensive 

2.1


 

Absent  the  Trust’s  approval  of  Project  Canvas,  YouView  would  not  exist.    The  BBC’s 

participation  in  YouView,  and  therefore  the  Trust  approval,  are inextricably  linked  to  the 

operation of the joint venture, and the Trust owes a continuing duty to licence fee payers 

and the wider market to ensure that the Trust Conditions, imposed to protect the licence 

fee and public interest, are fulfilled by the BBC, and the joint venture. 

2.2

 

It is therefore difficult to understand why the Trust would limit its review to consideration 



only of the Trust Conditions relating to:   

a)

 



access and usability features; 

b)

 



the use of 'editorial signposting'; 

c)

 



whether the BBC's involvement in YouView has had an impact on other public service 

broadcasters’ content syndication strategies; and 

d)

 

the way in which YouView is promoted by its partners,  



and would  ignore  the  many  other  conditions

3

  of  equal,  if  not greater,  significance  to  the 



fulfilment  of  BBC’s  objectives,  and  the  criteria  against  which  the  Trust  assessed  the 

proposals, namely: public value, value for money, licence fee payer interests, market impact, 

risk and compliance with the law and BBC policies. 

2.3


 

Indeed,  the  Trust’s  duties  under  the  BBC  Charter  require  that  it  conduct  a  rigorous  and 

comprehensive review of its approval decision and compliance with the conditions that it 

set for the BBC Executive when approving the launch of YouView: 

a)

 

the  Trust  is  the  “guardian  of  the  licence  fee  revenue  and  the  public  interest”  with 



ultimate responsibility … for … the BBC’s  stewardship of the licence fee revenue and its 

other resources; upholding the public interest within the BBC, particularly the interests of 

licence fee payers”;   

b)

 



the Trust’s general duties require that it “represent the interests of licence fee payers; … 

exercise rigorous stewardship of public money; have regard to the competitive impact of 

the BBC’s activities on the wider market; and ensure that the BBC observes high standards 

of openness and transparency.”;

4

 and 



c)

 

more  specifically  in  the  context  of  the  current  review,  the  Trust  has  specific 



responsibility  for  “assessing  the  performance  of  the  Executive  Board  in  delivering  the 

BBC’s  services  and  activities  and  holding  the  Executive  Board  to  account  for  its 

performance”  and  for  “discharging  the  regulatory  functions  accorded  to  the  Trust  and 

                                                           

3

  

Annex 1 summarises the additional conditions not listed as a focus of the Trust’s review. 



4

  

Article 22 of the BBC Charter.   



Confidential 

 



2906346_1 

 

holding  the  Executive  Board  to  account  for  the  BBC’s  compliance  with  applicable 



regulatory requirements and the general law”.

5

 



2.4

 

The  Trust  therefore  has  a  clear  duty  to  ensure  that  the  Trust  Conditions  have  been 



implemented  correctly  and  complied  with  over  the  course  of  the  joint  venture,  and  will 

continue to be met on an on-going basis.   



Contractual arrangements are no substitute for appropriate supervision 

2.5


 

Sky  notes  that  many  of  the  conditions  listed  in  Annex  1  were  required  as  a  condition  of 

approval to be included in the joint venture’s ‘Objects’ and shareholders agreement.  This 

mechanism  does  not  remove  the  need  for  the  Trust  to  review  the  efficacy  of  those 

provisions in achieving the Trust’s objectives.  As neither licence fee payers nor commercial 

stakeholders,  such  as  Sky,  have  visibility  over  the  terms  of  those  documents  and  no 

standing to challenge their operation, the Trust is uniquely placed, and therefore uniquely 

obligated,  to  consider  such  matters  as  part  of  their  duty  to  hold  the  BBC  Executive  to 

account.   

2.6


 

Reliance  on  contractual  provisions  alone  cannot  therefore  be  appropriate  in  such 

circumstances: for example, the Trust Conditions may not be adequately reflected in the 

agreements;  they  may  be  incorrectly  interpreted  by  the  parties;  or  may  be  ineffective  in 

achieving their objectives.  These are all questions the Trust should be asking of the BBC 

and YouView, and on which they must take action should the arrangements be found to be 

inadequate.  The Trust cannot derogate its role as the “guardian of the licence fee and of 

the  public  interest”  to  contract,  or  to  the  BBC  Executive.      In  this  regard,  Sky  respectfully 

submits that it was therefore incorrect to state in the Final Conclusions that the Trust had 

no remit to police the conduct of the joint venture”.

6

  If the Trust finds itself able to police 



the narrow set of conditions set out in its review statement, it can do so in relation to the 

remaining conditions.  Indeed, the Trust must do so in order to fulfil its duties.  



A review of the Trust’s approval of Project Canvas is timely 

2.7


 

Furthermore, a more thorough review of this kind is timely as:  

a)

 

the Trust considered the proposals more than three years ago;  



b)

 

the  YouView  platform  is  materially  different  to  that  described  in  the  Executive’s 



original  proposals  in  2008  and  throughout  the  approval  process,  with  further 

developments away from the core proposition of “a standards based open environment 



for internet connected television platforms in the UK”  under consideration.

7

  It must be a 



serious  concern  of  the  Trust’s  as  to  how  the  BBC’s  vision  has  been  distorted  to  the 

point  where  only  one  manufacturer  is  making  YouView  set  top  boxes  for  the  open 

market  (as  well  as  for  BT),  and  only  one  other  manufacturer  is  supplying  devices  to 

TalkTalk.  Meanwhile the BBC’s Freeview and Freesat platforms, as well as the majority 

of  new  television  sets,  offer  internet  connectivity  and  access  to  content  and 

functionality in excess of that available on YouView; and 

c)

 

irrespective of the outcome of this review, the Trust will need to satisfy itself that its 



conditions  are  reflected  in  any  renewal  of  YouView’s  ‘Objects’  and  shareholder 

agreement when the current shareholder agreement expires in March 2013. 



Failure to enforce the Trust Conditions undermines the Trust 

                                                           

5

  

Article 24(2)(f) of the BBC Charter. 



6

  

See Paragraph 2.50 of the BBC Trust’s Final Conclusions. 



7

  

See footnote 1 above. 



Confidential 

 



2906346_1 

 

2.8



 

Finally,  failure  to  monitor  and  enforce  the  Trust  Conditions  calls  into  question  the 

regulatory  framework  by  which  the  Trust  approves  Executive  proposals.    Any  process  of 

conditional  approval  (such  as  that  carried  out  in  relation  to  Project  Canvas/YouView) 

becomes otiose if compliance with those conditions is not kept under review.  

2.9


 

Accordingly,  the  Trust  must  consider,  as  part  of  its  review,  all  the  Trust  Conditions,  and 

should  not  rule  out  further  public  consultation  and  additional  conditions  on  the  BBC’s 

continued participation in the venture if appropriate.  

2.10

 

Given the lack of transparency over the operation of the joint venture, Sky has limited its 



response to those matters of which it has knowledge and particular concerns.  This should 

not be taken as meaning that Sky does not, or would not have other concerns regarding 

compliance with the Trust Conditions.  Sky would expect the Trust to publish the outcome 

of  its review  and  Sky  reserves  the right  to  provide  further  comments in response  in  due 

course.   

2.11


 

Accordingly, Sky has set out below its concerns that: 

a)

 

YouView  is  in  breach  of  the  Trust  Condition  prohibiting  the  bundling  of  access  to 



YouView for content providers with technical content delivery services and wholesale 

television services; 

b)

 

YouView is in breach of the obligation to provide access to the YouView EPG and UI on 



fair,  reasonable  and  non-discriminatory  grounds  by  granting  S4C  undue  prominence 

outside of Wales and Channel 4 undue prominence in Wales;  

c)

 

the costs borne by non-shareholders for access to YouView are disproportionate and 



discriminatory; and 

d)

 



the  BBC  is  at  risk  of  exceeding  the  limits  placed  by  the  Trust  on  its  financial 

contribution to YouView, and that the  lack of transparency  with regard to YouView’s 

financial  operations  makes  it  impossible  for  non-shareholders  to  verify  compliance 

with the Trust’s conditions relating to the BBC’s contribution on costs and competition 

law. 

3.

 

Access to YouView is being bundled with other services  

3.1


 

At  launch  the  YouView  platform  was  unable  to  support  IP-delivered  linear  channels  as 

originally proposed to the Trust.  Sky was therefore forced to launch its internet TV service, 

NOW TV, on YouView without the linear channels that accompanied the on-demand movie 

content  on  all  other  platforms.

8

    On  other  platforms  NOW  TV  also  includes  live  and  on-



demand  sports  content  from  Sky  Sports,  available  on  a  daily  subscription.    Sky  will  add 

entertainment channels and on-demand programming shortly.   

3.2

 

Sky had been led to believe that such functionality would be available within 12 months of 



YouView’s  launch  and  obtained  contractual  dispensations  from  licensors  to  make  the 

content available on an on-demand basis only, without the accompanying linear channels. 

3.3

 

The ability to include Sky’s linear channels in its NOW TV service on YouView is essential for 



the  success  of  the  service,  and  is  therefore  key  to  Sky’s  ability  to  recoup  its  significant 

investment in the platform.  The limited service available on YouView has had a detrimental 

impact  on  the  success  of  NOW  TV  on  the  platform  and  makes  marketing  the  service 

difficult due to the need to highlight differences to the service via YouView. 

                                                           

8

  



Had Sky waited until linear IP-delivered channels were available then NOW TV would have been 

listed at a less prominent position in the YouView UI, or it would not have launched at all pending 

resolution of the issues around the delivery of IP channels discussed in this submission.   


Confidential 

 



2906346_1 

 

3.4



 

YouView  subsequently  informed  Sky  that  although  multicast  delivery

9

  of  linear  services 



would be available within 12 months of launch,

10

 unicast delivery,



11

 Sky’s preferred method 

of  delivery,  would  not  be  available  for  a  further  12  months,  necessitating  further 

dispensations  from  content  licensors  and  postponing  rollout  of  Sky  Sports  content  to 

NOW TV on YouView. 

3.5


 

Details  of  the  arrangements  currently  necessary  for  IP-distribution  of  linear  channels  to 

YouView  set  top  boxes  have  only  come  to  light  as  negotiations  with  the  parties  have 

developed.   YouView  requires  that  broadcasters  enter  into  a  Listing  Agreement  and 

Channel  Distribution  Agreement  in  order  for  the  channel  to  be  available  to  YouView  set 

top  boxes,  however,  these  agreements  are  not  sufficient  to  enable  YouView  users  to 

access  the  channels.    As  YouView  set  top  boxes  can  currently  only  support  multicast-

delivered  IP  channels,  broadcasters  must  also  enter  into  a  multicast  distribution 

agreement with the relevant multicast network operator for access to their network and 

therefore to those YouView users whose use that operator’s ISP access service.

12

   


3.6

 

The vast majority of YouView set top boxes, however, are connected to BT’s and TalkTalk’s 



multicast networks.   Sky therefore requires access to those networks in order to be able 

to offer its channels to those YouView users, and in order to do that Sky must enter into 

distribution arrangements with both TalkTalk and BT for technical delivery of the channels 

over each of their multicast networks.  To date BT has only been prepared to discuss such 

arrangements in respect of Sky channels which it has the right to retail as part of their own 

pay-TV  services  under  a  wholesale  distribution  agreement.      BT’s  terms  of  access  have 

been  wholly  unreasonable,  thereby  preventing  Sky  from  making  its  channels  available  to 

YouView users on its network. 

3.7

 

Furthermore, Sky has been informed by YouView that unicast delivery of linear channels to 



the YouView platform, scheduled to be available in Q2 2014, will also require the consent of 

BT  and  TalkTalk  to  access  connected  YouView  set  top  boxes  on  each  of  their  networks.  

Sky  is  extremely  concerned  that  BT  will  not  consent  to  delivery  of  Sky’s  channels  via 

unicast.    BT  claims  that  unicast  delivery  of  linear  channels  will  not meet  the  required TV 

Quality  Standard.    Sky  maintains  that,  based  on  experience  with  the  successful  Sky  Go 

service,


13

  multicast  delivery  is  not  necessary  to  deliver  services  that  meet  the  required 

standard.  Sky has asked YouView whether it or BT will determine whether a service meets 

the TV Quality Standard, and has not received a satisfactory response to date. 

                                                           

9

  



Multicast  delivery  is  a  particular  method  of  delivering  content,  including  video,  on  a  one  to  many 

basis over an internet protocol infrastructure in a network.   It effectively requires the creation of a 

separate network within the open internet with greater control over the capacity allocated to the 

particular content being transmitted.  This is similar to tuning into a station on a radio. Each client 

that listens to the multicast adds no additional overhead on the server. In fact, the server sends out 

only one stream per multicast station. The same load is experienced on the server whether only one 

client or 1,000 clients are listening

.

 



10

  

IP-delivered  linear  channels  launched  on  BT  Vision’s  YouView-based  pay  TV  service  on  2  August 



2013. 

11

  



Unicast delivery is more widely used method of delivering content, including video, over the internet, 

with  a  one  to  one  connection  between  source  and  user.      Each  unicast  user  that  connects  to  a 

server takes up additional bandwidth. For example, if you have 10 clients all playing 100-kilobits per 

second (Kbps) streams, those clients as a group are taking up 1,000 Kbps. If you have only one client 

playing the 100 Kbps stream, only 100 Kbps is being used. 

12  


The requirement to obtain the ISP shareholders’ consent to delivery of linear content to YouView is 

reflected in the contractual documentation received from YouView, although it has been clarified by 

subsequent discussions.     

13

  



Sky Go is Sky’s ‘over the top’ internet delivered service which provides access to live channels and 

on-demand content across a wide range of devices, including mobiles, tablets and PCs. 



Confidential 

 



2906346_1 

 

3.8



 

These  additional  conditions  of  access  to  the  YouView  platform  imposed  by  the  ISP 

shareholders directly contravene the Trust Condition prohibiting bundling of access  with 

other products or services. 

3.9

 

It  would  also  be  of  grave  concern  were  ISP  shareholders  to  be  given  the  power  to 



determine  whether  a  service  meets  the  relevant  quality  standard,  rather  than  YouView, 

putting the those ISP shareholders in the position of gatekeepers over the platform.  

3.10

 

The  bundling  of  access  to  YouView  with  these  additional  services  reinforces  the  overall 



position  that  YouView  operates  as  a  closed  platform  for  the  benefit  of  its  ISP 

shareholders,  and  not  as  “a  standards  based  open  environment  for  internet  connected 



television  platforms  in  the  UK”.    This  is  the  case  because  each  ISP  is  able  to  control  the 

content delivered to YouView set top boxes on their network.   

3.11

 

Furthermore, it should be of concern to the Trust because it denies licence fee payers the 



full  public  value  of  the  BBC’s  intervention  by  restricting  their  access  to  a  wide  range  of 

content.    Further,  the  Trust’s  public  value  assessment  which  justified  the  venture  is 

substantially undermined by such an outcome. 

3.12


 

The bundling of access to the platform with wholesale services also distorts competition 

amongst  television  services.    For  example,  NOW  TV’s  ability  to  compete  with  BT  and 

TalkTalk’s  television  services  is  restricted  by  the  limited  nature  of  NOW  TV  on  YouView, 

including the lack of Sky’s sports content and linear movie channels in a way that the Trust 

Conditions  sought  to  avoid  in  order  to  comply  with  the  ‘Competitive  Impact  Principle’, 

which requires that the BBC  “must endeavour to minimise its negative competitive impacts 

on  the  wider  market”.      As  the  BBC’s  intervention  created  this  distortion  of  competition, 

there  is  a  significant  risk  that  the  continued  operation  of  YouView  as  a  closed  platform 

constitutes an illegal state aid.  

3.13


 

Accordingly the Trust must act immediately to prevent YouView continuing to operate as a 

closed  platform  for  the  ISP  shareholders  and  to  require  compliance  with  the  Trust 

Conditions by whatever means necessary, including changes to the joint venture’s Objects 

and shareholders agreement. 

4.

 

YouView is not providing access to its EPG and UI on an FRND basis 

4.1


 

Sky  has  agreed  to  make  its  Sky  Store  pay  per  view  service  available  on  YouView.    The 

service ought to occupy the last available slot on the front page of the On Demand menu, 

however,  YouView  has  now  informed  Sky  that  due  to  the  launch  of  S4C’s  on  demand 

service in a more prominent position due to its public service status, the Sky service will 

now appear on the second page of the menu.   

4.2

 

Under section 310 of the Communications Act 2003, S4C only has public service status in 



Wales.  Accordingly, outside of Wales, the service should not be given undue prominence.  

All  the  major platforms  deal  with  this  by  swapping  the  position of  Channel 4  and  S4C  in 

Wales,

14

 except YouView which intends retaining prominence for S4C outside of its public 



service territory.  This approach is contrary to both Ofcom's Code of practice for Electronic 

Programme  Guides  (‘the  EPG  Code’)  and  YouView’s  published  UI  and  EPG  policy  which 

seeks to comply with Ofcom’s code. 

4.3


 

Such  an  approach  cannot  be  fair,  reasonable  and  non-discriminatory,  and  should  be 

addressed by the Trust as an infringement of the Trust Conditions. 

 

                                                           



14

  

In Wales, S4C is available on Freeview 4, Sky 104, Virgin TV 166 and Freesat 104. In England, Scotland 



and Northern Ireland, S4C is available on Sky 134, Freesat 120 and Virgin TV 166. 

Confidential 

 



2906346_1 

 

5.



 

The cost of access to YouView are disproportionate and discriminatory  

5.1


 

The costs associated with a listing on YouView are very significant to the point of being 

exclusionary,  and  are  disproportionate  to  the  benefit  gained.    Sky,  more  than  most, 

however,  understands  the  costs  involved  in  creating  a  new  platform,  and  welcomed  the 

Trust’s condition that charges for access should be set on a cost recovery basis only.  Such 

an  approach  would  clearly  be  discriminatory  if  shareholders,  including  the  BBC  were  not 

charged on the same basis as non-shareholders, as this would result in non-shareholders 

bearing a disproportionate level of cost.  

5.2

 

The overall lack of transparency over charges hinders further comment on this issue.  Sky 



notes, however, that as a minimum, the Trust ought to require YouView publish details of 

its charges, and should confirm that non-shareholders are not being discriminated against.  

All  other  platforms  providing  access  to  content  providers  on  fair,  reasonable  and  non-

discriminatory basis publish rate cards.  YouView should do the same.  

5.3

 

The Trust must also consider the extent to which YouView discriminates unfairly against 



IP-delivered  channels  which  sit  alongside  DTT  delivered  channels  in  the  YouView  EPG.  

Broadcasters of IP-delivered channels are required to pay listing fees to gain access to the 

platform.    DTT  delivered  channels  pay  nothing  but  are  given  preferential  access  to  the 

platform  in  the  form  of  higher  EPG  positions.    This  places  IP-delivered  channels  at  a 

significant  disadvantage  vis-à-vis  DTT  delivered  channels.    The  principal  beneficiaries  of 

free access to the EPG are those broadcasters who also shareholders in YouView, however, 

other broadcasters also benefit, creating further distortions. 

5.4


 

The  Trust  Condition  requiring  fair,  reasonable  and  non-discriminatory  access  to  the 

YouView EPG must be applied to all services provided access to the platform. 

6.

 

The Trust must ensure the BBC’s contribution does not exceed the financial 

limits set by the Trust 

6.1


 

In  its  role  as  guardian  of  the  licence  fee  and  public  interest,  the  Trust  has  a  duty  to 

exercise  rigorous  oversight  of  how  the  licence  fee  is  spent,  including  the  BBC’s  financial 

contribution to YouView.  This is necessary not only to ensure that the costs of developing 

Project Canvas have been repaid in accordance with the Trust’s instructions to avoid any 

breach of state aid rules, but also to ensure compliance with the condition relating to the 

overall limit on the BBC’s financial contribution to the venture. 

6.2


 

The  Trust  approved  the  BBC’s  involvement  on  the  condition  that  “the  annual  cost  of  the 



BBC's involvement in Canvas shall not exceed the estimated cost of £24.7 million over a 5 year 

period by more than 20 per cent in any one year.”   The Trust allowed a 20% allowance, rather 

than  its  usual  10%  threshold,  to  take  account  of  the  uncertainties  inherent  in  such  a 

technologically complex project.    

6.3


 

If  the  BBC’s  contribution  exceeds  the  set  levels,  the  Executive  must  seek  further  Trust 

approval.    Sky  would  expect  the  Trust  to  publish  the  outcome  of  any  such  requests  for 

additional  funding, in particular  given  the  direct  link  between  such  costs  and the  Trust’s 

assessment of public value assessment and market impact.  Similarly, the Trust ought to 

publish a statement of compliance with the costs plan.     

6.4

 

Sky  notes  in  this  regard  that  reports  on  YouView’s  published  accounts  have  raised 



concerns as to the costs of the project which significantly exceeded the projected costs 

before  launch  as  compared  to  those  published  in  2009.

15

    There  have  also  been  recent 



                                                           

15

  



See  for  example, 

http://www.theguardian.com/media/2012/jan/10/youview-spent-20m

  and 

http://www.theguardian.com/media/2013/jan/07/lord-sugar-paid-500000-chair-youview



 

Confidential 

 



2906346_1 

 

reports  of  further  investment  by  the  shareholders  being  required.



16

    The  BBC  may 

therefore  be at risk of exceeding the thresholds set by the Trust in approving the BBC’s 

participation in the enterprise.  



7.

 

Conclusions 

7.1


 

Sky’s  experience  in  dealing  with  YouView  demonstrates  that  what  may  have  begun  as  a 

public  service  spirited  idea  to  develop  a  unified  open  standard  platform  has  singularly 

failed  to  deliver  on  that  promise.    Instead,  as  one  commentator  has  put  it,  “the  main 



beneficiaries  have  been  the  broadband  service provider  partners,  BT  and  TalkTalk,  who  have 

gained an enhanced platform and personal video recorder design at comparatively low cost, 

with the positive support of the BBC and other public service broadcasters

”.

17



 

7.2


 

There is a clear duty on the Trust to hold the joint venture to the Trust Conditions.  Failure 

to do so would be an abrogation of the Trust’s duties to act as guardian of the licence fee 

and public interest such as to render the conditions, and the process by which they came 

about irrelevant. 

7.3


 

It  is  also  evident  that  the  Trust  Conditions  are  not  being  complied  with  in  relation  to 

access  to  the  platform  for  content  providers  and  that  there  is  a  risk  that  certain 

shareholders are acting on incentives to discriminate in favour of their own retail services 

to  the  detriment of others.    The  Trust  must  use  all means  necessary  to  bring  about  the 

necessary  changes  to  the  operation  of  the  YouView  venture  to  prevent  further  harm  to 

the interests of licence fee payers and the wider market. 

7.4


 

Any further changes to the YouView proposition, including extending the venture online, 

should  first  be  considered  by  the  Trust  and  subject  to  the  same  approval  process  as 

Project Canvas in order to ensure that the proposals are of public value and to do not have 

a significant negative impact on the market.   Any further assessment of public value and 

market  impact  can  only  take  place  once  the  Trust  has  reviewed  the  original  approval 

process to understand how it could have better avoided the current position.  The Trust 

should review its previous forward-looking decision in the light of actual events in order to 

assess whether YouView is likely to deliver the hoped for public value and its impact on the 

wider market, or  whether alternative  strategies,  such  as  adopting  the HbbTV standard,

18

 

would  have  delivered  comparable  or  greater  public  value  with  less  negative  market 



impacts.  Only through such retrospective analysis will the Trust improve the quality of its 

decision-making processes and therefore better hold the BBC to account in the interests 

of licence fee payers.

19

     



 

 

Sky  



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                           October 2013 

 

 

 

                                                           

16

  

See “



YouView shareholders weigh cash injection

”, ft.com dated 10 October 2013. 

17

  

See 



http://informitv.com/news/2013/08/04/trustreviewsbbc/.

 

18



  

See, for example, 

http://www.dtg.org.uk/dtg/press_release.php?id=31

19



  

Sky  notes  the  recent  article  by  Nigel  Walley  of  Decipher  “

Tony  Hall’s  Vision  For  The  BBC  Re-

Interpreted

”  which  also  considers  the  BBC’s  investment  in  YouView  in  the  context  of  the  latest 

proposals for the BBC iPlayer. 



Confidential 

 



2906346_1 

 

Annex 1 



Additional Trust Conditions of the approval of YouView 

 

1.

 



The technical specification be developed with industry engagement;  

2.

 



The BBC’s share of the joint venture’s costs should not exceed the £24.7m estimated cost over 

five years; 

3.

 

The ‘free to air’ principle be complied with; 



4.

 

Operational costs be charged on a “cost recovery” basis only; 



5.

 

Entry controls imposed by YouView in terms of technical and content standards be minimal



6.

 

Access to the platform for content providers not be bundled with other products or services;  



7.

 

Listing on the electronic programme guide (‘EPG’) and user interface (‘UI’) be awarded in a fair, 



reasonable and non-discriminatory manner; 

8.

 



The  core  technical  specification  be  made  available  to  third  parties  on  a  fair, reasonable  and 

non-discriminatory basis;  

9.

 

The YouView trade mark be made available to those third parties eligible to license it on a cost 



recovery basis; 

10.


 

Safeguards  are  put  in  place  as  soon  as  reasonably  possible  after  approval  to  prevent  any 

sharing of strategy on syndication and other commercially sensitive information between the 

competing members of the joint venture. 

11.

 

Quality standards for ISPs delivering YouView be set at a minimum level; and applied in a fair, 



reasonable and non-discriminatory manner; and 

12.


 

Compliance  with  all  applicable  laws,  including  competition  and  state  aid  law  (including, 

subsequently,  repayment  by  YouView  to  the  BBC  the  costs  of  developing  the  technical 

standard). 



 


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling